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I learnt HTML/CSS/JS and practised making some static sites with it, just offline, no server/database... Now, I've done the tutorial for Django on djangoproject(so I have a polls app), but I'm not sure how I should mix the two to make a website.

The Django templates look like this:

{% if latest_poll_list %}
    <ul>
    {% for poll in latest_poll_list %}
        <li><a href="/polls/{{ poll.id }}/">{{ poll.question }}</a></li>
    {% endfor %}
    </ul>
{% else %}
    <p>No polls are available.</p>
{% endif %}

But when I look at the source of a django page like: http://www.michael54.com/hallway

There is nothing that looks like this template, no {% %}

So... Where does this template fit in to the page?

I just want to see how I'm meant to put together a page properly, so I know the basic framework and then I can develop my abilities from there. Right now, I don't even know where to start..

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closed as not constructive by talonmies, code_burgar, mu is too short, Peter Rowell, shellter Feb 3 '13 at 0:02

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2  
I don't think stackoverflow is the right place to ask this question, you're looking for a tutorial that shows step-by-step how to setup your website using django. Stackoverflow is about specific questions or problems you're having when programming –  thaJeztah Feb 2 '13 at 22:52
    
It's best to grab a book or a tutorial from the web. Work from that, bit by bit, and you'll soon get the hang on it. Indeed, if you view the HTML source of a page on the internet, you won't see its template source, since that was processed on the server before it got to you. –  halfer Apr 26 '13 at 21:59
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3 Answers 3

So... Where does this template fit in to the page?

It's a template!

The general concept is that your site probably has a number of html pages which all contain the same thing - a title bar, navigation, common css includes etc. The concept of the template mechanism is to provide a base template so that new pages can use this and only require minimal html to fill the content.

The other side to the template engine is that you can substitute in models to format and display data. For example, a user profile page might pass in the object person and you might output:

<p>Person's Name: {% person.name %}</p>

Which will produce the html:

<p>Person's Name: Fred</p>

Which brings me to how templates are handled. Templates are passed through the template processor - which looks for {{ and {% tags and performs the appropriate action based on their contents.

This is one part of the MVC concept. In this architecture, you split your project into three parts - models (of data, typically including logic that manipulates these objects), controllers (in Django, these are views), which determine what to display and views (in Django, Templates), which determine how to display it. The idea being that the separation aides in scaling the project.

You can start a Django project without models - you just need a view which returns a HttpResponse object. Normally you'd use the helper function render_to_response for this.

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That part of code you presented is Django Template - Django compiles it to simple html code.

These {% %} marks are just instructions for Django so it shall know it should do something with it, i.e. check some if statement or execute code inside for loop.

Let's see this template again:

{% if latest_poll_list %}
    <ul>
    {% for poll in latest_poll_list %}
        <li><a href="/polls/{{ poll.id }}/">{{ poll.question }}</a></li>
    {% endfor %}
    </ul>
{% else %}
    <p>No polls are available.</p>
{% endif %}

Now, assuming your latest_poll_list contains list of 2 items, Django template system compiles the above code to something like this:

    <ul>
        <li><a href="/polls/1/">Here is first poll's question</a></li>
        <li><a href="/polls/2/">Here is second poll's question</a></li>
    </ul>

Or, if there's no polls inside latest_poll_list variable, it shall display:

<p>No polls are available.</p>

I believe you should learn more about server-side rendering, I can't recommend any resources though.

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You might check out the source of Mezzanine A Django CMS on (github) to see how Static files like css and JS are arranged (it uses bootstrap but the principals) are the same for custom

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I believe the main OP's question was about template compiling, not about project files structure. Notice he's asking about not seeing {% %} tags on real page. –  aherok Feb 2 '13 at 23:06
    
Could be I just know that good examples helped me figure it out.. –  dartdog Feb 3 '13 at 0:59
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