Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Could someone explain step by step this code in Perl:

$.=.5;
$\=2/$.++-$\for$...1e6;
print
share|improve this question

Add white space:

$. = .5;
$\ = (2 / $.++) - $\ for $. .. 1e6;

Substitute with saner var names:

$x = .5;
$pi = (2 / $x++) - $pi for $x .. 1e6;

Don't use the same var for two purposes:

$x = .5;
$pi = (2 / $x++) - $pi for 0 .. 1e6;

Convert to formula:

pi = 2/1000000.5 - ( ... - (2/2.5 - (2/1.5 - (2/0.5))))

   = 2/1000000.5 - ... + 2/2.5 - 2/1.5 + 2/0.5

   = 4/2000001 - ... + 4/5 - 4/3 + 4/1

   = 4/1 - 4/3 + 4/5 - ... + 4/2000001

which is listed in Wikipedia as the Gregory–Leibniz series.

print; is print($_);, which prints $_ (unused, so undef, which stringifies to empty string) followed by $\ (which is normally an empty string, but is used as the accumulator in the original code).

share|improve this answer
    
You did not explain the single 'print'. – pktangyue Feb 2 '13 at 23:27
    
clear, upvote, and I think this should be added into your post. – pktangyue Feb 2 '13 at 23:31

Let's start first by breaking the code down into something more readable with some white-space. White space is relatively unimportant in Perl.

$. = .5;
$\ = 2 / $.++ - $\ for $. .. 1e6;
print

This code is making use of Perl's special built-in global variables to make things look short (man perlvar for more details on the specific variables this code is using). Let's make it more readable by replacing them with names that are human readable.

$denominator = .5;
$pi = 2 / $denominator++ - $pi for $denominator .. 1e6
print $pi

And just to help, let's move the inline for loop into a more verbose loop.

$denominator = .5;
foreach my $i ($denominator .. 1e6) {
  $pi = 2 / $denominator - $pi;
  $denominator += 1;
}
print $pi

So, this makes it a bit easier to decipher, and it's a standard convergence routine for calculating pi. There's a number of different ones, but basically, if you step through it, you'll see that it converges to the famous 3.14159... The denominator is okay to use as the first element of the sequence generator because it will floor to the integer 0.

Pass 1: 2 / 0.5 - 0 = 4
Pass 2: 2 / 1.5 - 4 = -2.666...
Pass 3: 2 / 2.5 - (-2.666...) = 3.4666...
Pass 4: 2 / 3.5 - 3.4666... = -2.895...
Pass 5: 2 / 4.5 - (-2.895...) = 3.339...

You get the idea. The code runs through 1,000,001 passes to reach the final approximation. As long as it runs an odd number of approximations, it should converge to pi (even numbered approximations converge to negative pi).

The reason the print statement works is that $\ is the output record separator. print by itself will print $_, the default variable, which will be empty. The value of pi will be in the $\ value, which will effectively be the line ending, so it prints out a blank value followed by the calculated value of pi (no traditional line ending).

share|improve this answer

This can be rewritten as:

use strict;
use warnings;

my $divisor = 0.5;
my $pi = 0;
for my $i (0..1e6)
{
    $pi = 2 / $divisor++ - $pi
}
print "$pi\n";

So it uses some mathematical series expansion to calculate pi (See @ikegami's answer)

share|improve this answer
1  
Technically, it only did print $pi; rather than print "$pi\n";. – ikegami Feb 2 '13 at 23:32
    
@ikegami: true, but not printing the trailing newline messes up my prompt :) – Adrian Pronk Feb 2 '13 at 23:35

Wow, that's a beauty. Someone was trying to make that look as convoluted as possible. Here's a more readable version:

my $pi = 0;
for (my $i=0.5; $i < 1e6+1; $i++)
{
    $pi=2/$i - $pi;
}
print $pi."\n";

This is the mathematical representation of the Gregory-Leibnitz Formula

The original version uses a few Perl special variables to confuse you. The $. is entirely unnecessary here and purely for obfuscation. The $\ is the output record separator. That means this variable will be appended after a print statement. Therefore, the single print at the end simply prints the result of the calculation that was stored in $\. Finally, the code uses a post-fix for loop and the .. operator instead of the more explicit for loop in my version. I hope that clears things up a bit.

share|improve this answer
    
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Code_golf – toolic Feb 3 '13 at 0:15
    
I had a suspicion it must have been something like that... – DaGaMs Feb 3 '13 at 0:28
1  
for my $i (0..1e6) { ... 2/($i+0.5) ...} is simpler than for (my $i=0.5; $i < 1e6+1; $i++) { ... 2/$i ...} – ikegami Feb 3 '13 at 0:42
    
@ikegami arguably so. My main point was to make the for loop explicit a-la C or Java, to avoid the - potentially - confusing .. syntax. But in the end, it really depends on what part of the code the OP didn't understand :-) – DaGaMs Feb 3 '13 at 12:37
    
My point was the opposite; that C-style loops are awful. They are so complex, that we either need to wade through nine operators, or make assumptions as to what those operators are. Both are very bad compared option compared to a counting loop (for (1..5))'s two operators. It's not "potentionally confusing"; it's prime example of clarity! Potentionally confusing is having to hunt a symbol-dense line to see if < if followed by = (and the very fact that one hunts for that means one is making assumptions about what's around). Potentionally confusing is non-standard start bounds. etc. – ikegami Feb 3 '13 at 12:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.