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I'm looking for a C++ "equivalent" of Java ByteBuffer.

I'm probably missing the obvious or just need an isolated usage example to clarify. I've looked through the iostream family & it looks like it may provide a basis. Specifically, I want to be able to:

  • build a buffer from a byte array/point and get primitives from the buffer, e.g. getByte, getInt
  • build a buffer using primitives e.g. putByte, putInt and then get the byte array/pointer.
share|improve this question
    
It's important to note that in get(T) and put(T), T is not byte. It is other primitive types, such as int, float, and short. –  Rob Kennedy Sep 23 '09 at 15:52
    
Yes, it was an unfortunate choice of naming on my part. I have made that clearer. –  hplbsh Sep 23 '09 at 15:57

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You have stringbuf, filebuf or you could use vector<char>.


This is a simple example using stringbuf:

std::stringbuf buf;
char data[] = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
char tempbuf[sizeof data];

buf.sputn(data, sizeof data); // put data
buf.sgetn(tempbuf, sizeof data); // get data


Thanks @Pete Kirkham for the idea of generic functions.

#include <sstream>

template <class Type>
std::stringbuf& put(std::stringbuf& buf, const Type& var)
{
    buf.sputn(reinterpret_cast<const char*>(&var), sizeof var);

    return buf;
}

template <class Type>
std::stringbuf& get(std::stringbuf& buf, Type& var)
{
    buf.sgetn(reinterpret_cast<char*>(&var), sizeof(var));

    return buf;
}

int main()
{
    std::stringbuf mybuf;
    char byte = 0;
    int var;

    put(mybuf, byte++);
    put(mybuf, byte++);
    put(mybuf, byte++);
    put(mybuf, byte++);

    get(mybuf, var);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This would be a better example if the thing being extracted from the buffer weren't another array of char. ByteBuffer allows extracting other primitive types from the byte buffer, not just bytes. java.sun.com/j2se/1.4.2/docs/api/java/nio/ByteBuffer.html –  Rob Kennedy Sep 23 '09 at 15:49
    
My choice of get(T) and put(T) as examples was rather poor; I would like to extract variable sizes from the buffer. std::stringbuf feels like the right direction. Thanks. –  hplbsh Sep 23 '09 at 15:54
    
Its non-character based. Perhaps std::streambuf is a better choice in this case though they both ought to be workable. –  hplbsh Sep 23 '09 at 16:09
2  
Aha. streambuf is an abstract class, stringbuf is just called stringbuf but that doesn't mean it is character based. It is just a buffer of bytes. but the type of elements is char which is why called (string)buf. –  AraK Sep 23 '09 at 16:12
std::vector<char> bytes;

bytes.push_back( some_val ); // put

char x = bytes[N];           // get

const char* ptr = &bytes[0]; // pointer to array
share|improve this answer

for std::vector more efficient is method

push_back(T)

You can find more here:

http://www.cppreference.com/wiki/stl/vector/start

and general about cpp stl libs

http://www.cppreference.com/wiki/stl/start

There are many containers, depends what do You need it for,

  • speed aggregation (fast writing capabilities) or
  • fast read

take a look at std::list, std::vector.

share|improve this answer

stringstream provides basic unformatted get and write operations to write blocks of chars. To specialise on T either subclass or wrap it, or provide free standing template functions to use the get/write appropriately sized memory.

template <typename T>
std::stringstream& put ( std::stringstream& str, const T& value )
{
    union coercion { T value; char   data[ sizeof ( T ) ]; };

    coercion    c;

    c.value = value;

    str.write ( c.data, sizeof ( T ) );

    return str;
}

template <typename T>
std::stringstream& get ( std::stringstream& str, T& value )
{
    union coercion { T value; char   data[ sizeof ( T ) ]; };

    coercion    c;

    c.value = value;

    str.read ( c.data, sizeof ( T ) );

    value = c.value;

    return str;
}

You could write such templates for whatever other stream or vector you want - in the vector's case, it would need to use insert rather than write.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice solution :) I think streams are more a tool to read and write formatted data. Why would I use a stream like a buffer, where inside the stream there is a buffer. Still, I think your generic functions are excellent idea. –  AraK Sep 23 '09 at 16:14
    
I tend to prefer streams as I like the coercion to bool and the idiom of returning the stream for chaining, rather than the buffer's returning of the number of bytes written and having to fiddle around testing that. –  Pete Kirkham Sep 23 '09 at 18:52

Thanks for all the input, it has lead to this pretty simple solution:


class ByteBuffer : std::stringbuf
{
public:
    template 
    size_t get( T &out)
    {
    	union coercion { T value; char data[ sizeof ( T ) ]; };

    	coercion c;

    	size_t s= xsgetn( c.data, sizeof(T));

    	out= c.value;

    	return s;
    }

    template 
    size_t put( T &in)
    {	
    	union coercion { T value; char data[ sizeof ( T ) ]; };

    	coercion c;

    	c.value= in;

    	return xsputn( c.data, sizeof(T));
    }

    size_t get( uint8_t *out, size_t count)
    {
    	return xsgetn((char *)out, count);
    }

    size_t put( uint8_t *out, size_t count)
    {
    	return xsputn((char *)out, count);
    }
};

To use eg:


void ByteBufferTest( void)
{
    ByteBuffer bb;

    float f= 4;
    uint8_t u8= 1;
    uint16_t u16= 2;
    uint32_t u32= 4;
    uint64_t u64= 8;

    bb.put(f);
    bb.put(u8);
    bb.put(u16);
    bb.put(u32);
    bb.put(u64);

    uint8_t array[19];

    bb.get( array, 19);

    // or

    bb.get(f);
    bb.get(u8);
    bb.get(u16);
    bb.get(u32);
    bb.get(u64);
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1: I really dislike the idea that you're subclassing an std::stringbuf. Use composition instead. Most types in that namespace are not designed for that. Also, why are you using size_t's like that? –  Arafangion May 2 '11 at 23:22
    
I was young and foolish in 2009 ;) –  hplbsh May 7 '11 at 19:50
    
We've all been there. :) –  Arafangion May 9 '11 at 1:00

I wrote this awhile back to do exactly what you're asking for. Give it a shot:

https://code.google.com/p/bytebuffer-cpp/

share|improve this answer
1  
That is exactly what I wanted :) –  hplbsh Mar 13 '13 at 13:06
    
Thanks, works great! –  uncletall Nov 14 '13 at 6:47

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