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If I had an Observable collection like so :

public ObservableCollection<SpecialPriceRow> SpecialPriceRows = new ObservableCollection<SpecialPriceRow>();

SpecialPriceRow class :

public class SpecialPriceRow : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public enum ChangeStatus
    {
        Original,
        Added,
        ToDelete,
        Edited
    }

    public ChangeStatus Status { get; set; }
    public string PartNo { get; set; }

    private decimal _price;
    public decimal Price
    {
        get
        {
            return _price;
        }
        set
        {
            if (value != _price)
            {
                _price = value;
                Status = ChangeStatus.Edited;
                OnPropertyChanged("Status");
            }
        }
    }

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
    private void OnPropertyChanged(string name)
    {
        PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged;
        if (handler != null)
        {
            handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(name));
        }
    }
}

Would it be possible for me to bind a Label in the XAML to the count of objects that are say ... Added? So I could get something like this :

enter image description here

Where green is the count of "Added" objects within the collection. How would I go about doing something like this?

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1  
I'd try for the different bindings: DataConverters or create getter propreties and bind to them. –  Luis Filipe Feb 3 '13 at 0:23

2 Answers 2

I've written up a ViewModel which will perform the desired functionality you are looking for.

    class VM : INotifyPropertyChanged
    {
        public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
        public ObservableCollection<SpecialPriceRow> _SpecialPriceRows = new ObservableCollection<SpecialPriceRow>();
        private int _Original = 0;
        private int _Added = 0;
        private int _ToDelete = 0;
        private int _Edited = 0;

        public VM()
        {
            PropertyChanged = new PropertyChangedEventHandler(VM_PropertyChanged);

            //The following lines in the constructor just initialize the SpecialPriceRows.
            //The important thing to take away from this is setting the PropertyChangedEventHandler to point to the UpdateStatuses() function.
            for (int i = 0; i < 12; i++)
            {
                SpecialPriceRow s = new SpecialPriceRow();
                s.PropertyChanged += new PropertyChangedEventHandler(SpecialPriceRow_PropertyChanged);
                SpecialPriceRows.Add(s);
            }
            for (int j = 0; j < 12; j+=2)
                SpecialPriceRows[j].Price = 20;
        }

        private void VM_PropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
        {
        }

        private void SpecialPriceRow_PropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            if (e.PropertyName == "Status")
                UpdateStatuses();
        }

        public ObservableCollection<SpecialPriceRow> SpecialPriceRows
        {
            get
            {
                return _SpecialPriceRows;
            }
        }

        private void UpdateStatuses()
        {
            int original = 0, added = 0, todelete = 0, edited = 0;
            foreach (SpecialPriceRow SPR in SpecialPriceRows)
            {
                switch (SPR.Status)
                {
                    case SpecialPriceRow.ChangeStatus.Original:
                        original++;
                        break;
                    case SpecialPriceRow.ChangeStatus.Added:
                        added++;
                        break;
                    case SpecialPriceRow.ChangeStatus.ToDelete:
                        todelete++;
                        break;
                    case SpecialPriceRow.ChangeStatus.Edited:
                        edited++;
                        break;
                    default:
                        break;
                }
            }
            Original = original;
            Added = added;
            ToDelete = todelete;
            Edited = edited;
        }

        public int Original
        {
            get
            {
                return _Original;
            }
            set
            {
                _Original = value;
                PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs("Original"));
            }
        }

        public int Added
        {
            get
            {
                return _Added;
            }
            set
            {
                _Added = value;
                PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs("Added"));
            }
        }

        public int ToDelete
        {
            get
            {
                return _ToDelete;
            }
            set
            {
                _ToDelete = value;
                PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs("ToDelete"));
            }
        }

        public int Edited
        {
            get
            {
                return _Edited;
            }
            set
            {
                _Edited = value;
                PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs("Edited"));
            }
        }
    }

Take note of the comments in the constructor. You need to point the PropertyChanged event of each SpecialPriceRow to the UpdateStatuses function in order for this to work properly. Now all you need to do is bind your labels to the appropriate properties in the ViewModel. If your SpecialPriceRows list becomes very large, you may want to consider calculating the status counts a bit differently. Currently, it is iterating through the entire list every time one instance is updated. For this to perform better, you may want to keep the old value of the status in the SpecialPriceRow class and every time an update occurs, increment the new status count and decrement the old one.

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I'm not aware of any builtin functionality to do this. I would create a custom property in your data context class that does the counting and bind to this.

Something like this:

public int AddedCount
{
    get
    {
        return SpecialPriceRows.Where(r => r.Status == ChangeStatus.Added).Count();
    }
}

Then whenever an item is changed or added you need to explicitly raise the property changed for this:

public void AddItem()
{
    ...
    OnPropertyChanged("AddedCount");
}

Then you only need to bind in your XAML code like:

<TextBlock Text="{Binding AddedCount}" />

You may need to subscribe to the change events in your collection to know when an item changes.

Alternative:

You can also create a ListCollectionView with a specific filter and bind to its Count property:

    AddedItems = new ListCollectionView(TestItems);
    AddedItems.Filter = r => ((SpecialPriceRow)r).Status == ChangeStatus.Added;

In your XAML you would then bind to the Count property of this:

<TextBlock Text="{Binding AddedItems.Count}" />

This has the advantage that it will automatically keep track of added and removed items in the collection and update itself. You have to refresh it manually though when the property of an item changes which affects the filter.

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