Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a project, and a case where I have a few often-changed preprocessor #defines that control how it works--ex:

void myfunction(int num, mystruct* content) {
    doSomethingTo(content);
    //...
    #ifdef FEATURE_X
    feature_x(content);
    #endif
}

This works fine, although it does have to be recompiled each time, so it's in the "stuff that has to be recompiled each time" file. I would like to push it into a [static] library instead. I'm ok with changing how it's called (already have a function pointer for picking myFunction), so I'd like that to turn into

void myfunction(int num, mystruct* content) {
    doSomethingTo(content);
    //...
}
void myfunction_featureX(int num, mystruct* content) {
    doSomethingTo(content);
    //...
    feature_x(content);
}

I need to do this in a couple places, so using a separate library (one with and one without -D FEATURE_X) for each isn't an acceptable option. I could do it with copy/paste, but that results in code reuse that carries a risk of fixing a bug in one copy but not the other.

share|improve this question
3  
This is a perfect counterexample of 'code reuse' and refactoring. You should definitively not be doing this. –  user529758 Feb 2 '13 at 23:45

3 Answers 3

Have the featureX versions of functions call the mainline functions. In your example myfunction_featureX would call myfunction and then do its own thing.

share|improve this answer
    
... how did I not think of this. It won't work in cases where execution order isn't up for debate, but if it doesn't matter, this solution is excellent. –  zebediah49 Feb 3 '13 at 0:34

Surely, this is the point at which you change the activation of Feature X from a compile time issue into a run-time issue:

void myfunction(int num, mystruct* content)
{
    doSomethingTo(content);
    //...
    if (FeatureX_Enabled())
        feature_x(content);
}

The FeatureX_Enabled() test might be a full function, or it might be simply test an appropriately scoped variable that is defined outside the function — a static variable in the file, or an external variable. This avoids having to futz with the function pointers; it's the same function called as now. Changing a table of function pointers is equivalent to changing a single variable — it involves changing the value of something stored outside the function to change the behaviour of the function.

share|improve this answer

Would it help if you put myfeature_x in a function table instead?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

typedef struct {
  int x,y;
} mystruct;

typedef void (*fn_ptr)(mystruct* content);
fn_ptr vtable[10];
#define FEATURE_X_INDEX 0

void feature_x(mystruct *content)
{
  printf("y: %d\n", content->y);
}

void myfunction(int num, mystruct* content) {
  printf("x: %d\n", content->x);

  //...
  if (vtable[FEATURE_X_INDEX]) {
    vtable[FEATURE_X_INDEX](content);
  }
}

int main(void)
{
  bzero(vtable, sizeof(vtable));
  mystruct s;
  s.x = 1;
  s.y = 2;
  myfunction(0, &s);
  if (1) {
    //Of course you'd use a more sensible condition.
    vtable[FEATURE_X_INDEX] = feature_x;
  }
  myfunction(0, &s);
  return 0;
}

Output:

x: 1
x: 1
y: 2

Then all you need to do is populate the virtual function table with NULLs if that feature is not to be used, and with function pointers if it is to be used. This you can do from wherever you want - your static library for example.. or you can compile feature_x into a dynamic library, load it at runtime and if the loading succeeded populate the function table, and clear the table when the dynamically linked library is unloaded.

I think the only benefit this really gives you over Jonathan Leffler's method is that the code for feature_x doesn't actually need to be linked into the same binary as your other code. If all you need is a runtime switch to turn the feature on or off, a simple if statement should do the trick, as Jonathan Leffler suggested. (Incidentally, there's an if here, too - it checks the function table's content :) )

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.