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I am new to programming in Java.

I want to system.out.println dates that the user has input and have it know if it is a 'st', 'th', 'rd' and 'nd'. So if I input '13' for the date I was born it would add the 'th' to it to make it '13th'.

How do I do this automatically with all numbers '1' through '31'?

Should I use parallel arrays and have one part the '1' through '31' [0] - [30] and the part the [0] - [3] for st,nd,rd,th? and have them match accordingly?

If so or if not how do i declare it and such?

Sorry for the horribly written question. It's hard for me to get my thoughts out.

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No need for a parallel array, you can use the index itself, e.g. a[0] = "st" (index = date - 1). BUT, AlexWien's answer is simpler. –  dmon Feb 3 '13 at 1:05

6 Answers 6

public static void main(String[] args) {
        String[] dates = {"","1st","2nd","3rd","4th",...,"31st"};
        int input = 24;
        System.out.println(dates[input]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is terribly inefficient. See AlexWein's answer. -1 –  Doorknob Feb 3 '13 at 1:06
    
@Doorknob yes, but maybe simpler to explain to the teacher... If the teacher would ask what happens with day 20, what is 20%10 ?, what is a modulo operation .... –  AlexWien Feb 3 '13 at 1:08
    
@Doorknob Just tried to provide an alternative. I believe my approach is efficient time-wise while the other is efficient space-wise :) –  Terry Li Feb 3 '13 at 1:09
    
Inefficient? You mean, it takes 3µs instead of 1? (If at all, as the compiler can store the whole array in the constant pool.) You have proof for that claim? –  Ingo Feb 3 '13 at 1:10
    
@TerryLi Alright that makes sense. Removing -1 :) –  Doorknob Feb 3 '13 at 1:10

I would do it rather that way:

String getExtension(int day) {

  switch(day) {

    case 1:
    case 21:
    case 31:
    return "st";

    case 2:
    case 22:
    return "nd";

    case 3:
    case 23:
    return "rd";

    default:
    return "th";
  }

}


String formatDay(int day) {
   return day + getExtension(day);
}
share|improve this answer

I would use an switch statement

 int day;
    // no read in or assign day: 1 - 31

String ext;
// day % 10 (modulo 10) reduces to 0-9
switch (day % 10) {
case 1: ext = "st"; 
  break;
case 2: ext = "nd"; 
  break;
case 3: ext = "rd"; 
  break;
default: ext = "th";
  break;
}
if (day >= 11 && day <==13) ext == "th";
String dayText = "day: " + day + ext;
share|improve this answer
1  
Use switch (day % 10) to handle 2 digit numbers –  Doorknob Feb 3 '13 at 1:03
    
Thanks .......... –  AlexWien Feb 3 '13 at 1:06
1  
it's more complicate: 11, 12, 13 takes th. –  Cyrille Ka Feb 3 '13 at 1:09
    
@Cyrille Karmann yes its is a bit advanced, but to the downvoter: there is no need to downvote the correct solution. –  AlexWien Feb 3 '13 at 1:10
    
I didn't downvote. It's a fine solution (quite close to mine) and can be amended to be correct. –  Cyrille Ka Feb 3 '13 at 1:12

I recommend using a switch statement but make sure to order it to include 11, 12, and 13.

switch (day) {
case 2:
case 22:
    suffix = "nd";
    break;
case 3:
case 23:
    suffix = "rd";
    break;
default:
    //Accounts for all other numbers including 1, 11, 12, 13, 21, and 31
    suffix = "st";
    break; //Because I'm a conformist.
}
share|improve this answer
    
And when day == 14 ? –  Cyrille Ka Feb 3 '13 at 1:13
    
Fine...I'll fix the comment... –  supersam654 Feb 3 '13 at 1:14
public class SourceCodeProgram {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(OrdinalNumber.format(1));
        System.out.println(OrdinalNumber.format(2));
        System.out.println(OrdinalNumber.format(3));
        System.out.println(OrdinalNumber.format(4));
        System.out.println(OrdinalNumber.format(5));
        System.out.println(OrdinalNumber.format(6));
        System.out.println(OrdinalNumber.format(12));
        System.out.println(OrdinalNumber.format(23));
        System.out.println(OrdinalNumber.format(101));
    }
}

class OrdinalNumber {

    public static String format(int value) {
        if (value > 3 && value < 21) {
                        //exception
            return value + "th";
        }
        switch (value % 10) {
        case 1:
            return value + "st";
        case 2:
            return value + "nd";
        case 3:
            return value + "rd";
        default:
            return value + "th";
        }
    }
}

Additionally, please see:

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I don't think you need to do that. There are well defined rules about this sort of appendage to a date.

  • If the date ends in 1 and is less than 10 or greater than 20, it ends in 'st'.
  • If the date ends in 2 and is less than 10 or greater than 20, it ends in 'nd'.
  • If the date ends in 3 and is less than 10 or greater than 20, it ends in 'rd'.
  • All other dates end in 'th'.

Here's my grossly over-engineered solution. Take from it what you will.

public String appendDateEnding(String theDate) {
    if(null != theDate) {
        try {
            return appendDateEnding(Integer.parseInt(theDate));
        } catch (NumberFormatException e) {
            // we'll return null since we don't have a valid date.
        }
    }
    return null;
}

private String appendDateEnding(int theDate) {
    StringBuffer result = new StringBuffer();
    if(32 <= theDate || 0 >= theDate) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Invalid date.");
    } else {
        result.append(theDate);
        int end = theDate % 10;
        if(1 == end && isValidForSuffix(theDate)) {
            result.append("st");
        } else if(2 == end && isValidForSuffix(theDate)) {
            result.append("nd");
        } else if(3 == end && isValidForSuffix(theDate)) {
            result.append("rd");
        } else {
            result.append("th");
        }
    }
    return result.toString();
}

private boolean isValidForSuffix(int theDate) {
    return (10 > theDate || 20 < theDate);
}

What it prints out, if given a range of days between 1 and 31:

1st
2nd
3rd
4th
5th
6th
7th
8th
9th
10th
11th
12th
13th
14th
15th
16th
17th
18th
19th
20th
21st
22nd
23rd
24th
25th
26th
27th
28th
29th
30th
31st
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