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I am trying to update a record in an access file (.accdb). I am trying to use the .net OleDbCommand and OleDbParameters. I am also trying to use a generic model and store all of the commands and parameters in the System.Data.Common abstract equivalents so that I can easily switch over to SQL Server (which I do plan to do)

So here is the actual command being used

EDIT 2/2/2013 - 9:10pm the command.ExecuteNonQuery is inside the method named ExecuteNonQuery() the connectionString and command are defined in the DataAccess class constructor

public class DataAccess
{

    private string connectionString;
    private DbConnection connection;
    private DbCommand command;
    private DbDataReader reader;
    private DataTable data;

    public DataAccess()
    {
        connectionString = ConfigurationSettings.AppSettings["ConnectionString"];

        switch (ConfigurationSettings.AppSettings["DataBaseType"])
        {
            case "oledb":
                connection = new OleDbConnection(connectionString);
                command = new OleDbCommand(string.Empty, (OleDbConnection)connection);
                break;
            case "SQL":                 
                connection = new SqlConnection(connectionString);
                command = new SqlCommand(string.Empty, (SqlConnection)connection);
                break;
            default:
                break;
        }

    }

    public void ExecuteNonQuery(string SQL, params DbParameter[] parameters)
    {
        command.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
        command.CommandText = SQL;
        command.Parameters.AddRange(parameters);

        try
        {
            command.Connection.Open();

            try
            {
                command.ExecuteNonQuery();
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                throw ex;
            }
            finally
            {
                command.Connection.Close();
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            throw ex;
        }
    }

    public DbParameter NewParameter(string name, object value)
    {
        DbParameter param;

        switch (ConfigurationSettings.AppSettings["DataBaseType"])
        {
            case "oledb":
                param = new OleDbParameter(name, value);
                break;
            case "SQL":
                param = new SqlParameter(name, value);
                break;
            default:
                param = null;
                break;
        }

        return param;
    }

These are the properties in the App.Config File

<add key="DataBaseType" value="oledb"/>

<add key="ConnectionString" value="Provider=Microsoft.ACE.OLEDB.12.0;Data Source=data.accdb"/>

Now the problem is when using parameters in an update statement, the update never happens and also never throws an error. Here is the code for it.

EDIT 2/2/2013 - 9:10pm the function DataAccess.NewParameter is in the first code block

DALayer.ExecuteNonQuery("UPDATE TileTypes SET Title = @Title, Picture = @Picture, Color = @Color WHERE ID = @ID",
 DALayer.NewParameter("@Title", titleTextBox.Text.Trim()),
 DALayer.NewParameter("@Picture", typePictureBox.ImageLocation),
 DALayer.NewParameter("@Color", colorButton.BackColor.ToArgb()),
 DALayer.NewParameter("@ID", id));

I have copied the query into access and replaced all of the parameter names with the actual data being passed, this works fine. I have tried replacing all of the parameters in the SQL text to the ? character to no effect. I have tried enclosing all of the table and column names in brackets [] also to no effect.

  • ID is an AutoNumber field
  • Title is a Text field
  • Picture is a Text field
  • Color is a Long Integer field

This is some example data that was copied directly from the parameters in the watch window for Visual Studio:

  • "Edit" (title)
  • -1 (color)
  • "data\images\Edit_000000.jpg" (picture)
  • 740 (id)

That ID does exist in the database and was unchanged after the query executed.

EDIT 2/2/2013 - 9:10pm I am not sure how to check which database is actually being updated, the only thing I could think of was that using the same connection string and connection object I did an insert statement with the same ExecuteNonquery method and it worked in the database I was viewing. And the update statement works just fine like this (without parameters):

DALayer.ExecuteNonQuery("UPDATE TileTypes SET Title = '" + titleTextBox.Text + 
"', Color = " + colorButton.BackColor.ToArgb() + ", Picture = '" + 
imageLocation + "' WHERE ID = " + id);

EDIT 2/2/2013 - 9:41pm I have used everything.exe to search my computer for all of the data.accdb files on my computer, I have found no actual .accdb files besides the original but I did find these .lnk files, I do not believe they could have altered this process but I will mention it anyway

data.accdb.LNK

share|improve this question
    
Its hard to tell what you are doing in each of the UpDate Param queries where are you executing the non query command.. can you clean the example up better and show the full code for the code that is not working ...not for the code that is working.. –  MethodMan Feb 3 '13 at 1:17
    
Are you sure that you are checking the data in the correct database? I only say this because you could be looking at a copy of the file. –  PhoenixReborn Feb 3 '13 at 1:18
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow! I have edited your title. Please see, "Should questions include “tags” in their titles?", where the consensus is "no, they should not". –  John Saunders Feb 3 '13 at 1:27
    
I would set a breakpoint at command.ExecuteNonQuery(); and check the command parameters are set correctly. –  Richard Schneider Feb 3 '13 at 4:12
    
Do you recall a message when you created the project "The connection you selected uses a local data file that is not in the current project. Would you like to copy the file to your project and modify the connection? If you copy the data file to your project, it will be copied to the project's output directory each time you run the application." -- msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms246989(v=vs.100).aspx ? –  Fionnuala Feb 3 '13 at 11:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

What you are trying to do is something I too have done in the past, but allowed to connect to OleDB (such as Access, Visual FoxPro, etc), SQL-Server, SyBase SQLAnywhere and maybe my implementation might help you. First, each of the elements you would use for connecting work on a common interface, such as IDbConnection, IDbCommand, IDbParameter, etc.

The following I'm posting is a small segment of how I originally structured such multi-database connection type. I've stripped a bunch out and not actually tested this stripped version, but it SHOULD be a good baseline for you to run with.

The premise is a baseline "MyConnection" to almost be like an abstract, but has properties and some "common" methods that would exist under EITHER subclassed definition. From this, each of the functions and parameter types are based on the "I"nterface, not a specific. However, each of the derived will create its OWN proper type. This removes the need to "Case" everything. Hope this helps you along with your Data Access Layer development.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Data;

// for OleDB (Access, VFP, etc)
using System.Data.OleDb;
// for SQL-Server
using System.Data.SqlClient;

namespace DataMgmt
{
    public class MyConnection
    {
        // no matter the connection to server, it will require some "handle"
        // that is of type "IDbConnection"
        protected IDbConnection sqlConnectionHandle;

        // when querying, ANY query could have an exception that needs to have
        // possible further review for handling
        public Exception LastException
        { get; protected set; }

        // When calling an execute command (select, insert, update, delete), 
        // they all can return how many rows affected
        public int RowsAffectedByQuery
        { get; protected set; }

        // different databases could have different connection strings. Make
        // virtual and throw exception so sub-classed must return proper formatted.
        public virtual string GetConnectionString()
        { throw new Exception("GetConnectionString() method must be overridden."); }

        // each has its own "IDbConnection" type too
        protected virtual IDbConnection SQLConnectionHandle()
        { return sqlConnectionHandle; }

        public virtual IDbCommand GetSQLDbCommand()
        { throw new Exception("GetSQLDbCommand() method must be overridden."); }

        // generic routine to get a data parameter...
        public virtual IDbDataParameter AddDbParmSpecificValue(string ParmName, object UnknownValue)
        { throw new Exception("AddDbParmSpecificValue() method must be overwritten per specific connection."); }

        // generic "Connection" since they are all based on IDbCommand...
        public override bool SQLConnect()
        {
            // pre-blank exception in case remnant from previous activity
            LastException = null;

            if (sqlConnectionHandle.State != System.Data.ConnectionState.Open)
                try
                {
                    // if not open, always make sure we get updated connection string
                    // if ever changed by some other "unknown" condition...
                    sqlConnectionHandle.ConnectionString = GetConnectionString();
                    sqlConnectionHandle.Open();
                }
                catch (Exception ex)
                {
                    // Preserve in generic sqlException" property for analysis OUTSIDE this function
                    LastException = ex;
                }

            // if NOT connected, display message to user and set error code and exception
            if (sqlConnectionHandle.State != System.Data.ConnectionState.Open)
                LastException = new Exception("Unable to open database connection.");

            // return if it IS successful at opening the connection (or was already open)
            return sqlConnectionHandle.State == System.Data.ConnectionState.Open;
        }

        // likewise disconnect could be common
        public void SQLDisconnect()
        {
            if (sqlConnectionHandle != null)
                if (sqlConnectionHandle.State == ConnectionState.Open)
                    sqlConnectionHandle.Close();
        }


        public bool SqlExecNonQuery( IDbCommand SQLCmd, DataTable oTbl)
        {
            // pre-clear exception
            LastException = null;

            // fill the table...
            SQLConnect();
            try
            {
                RowsAffectedByQuery = SQLCmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                LastException = e;
                throw e;
            }
            finally
            {
                SQLDisconnect();
            }

            // Its all ok if no exception error
            return LastException == null;
        }

    }


    // Now, build your connection manager per specific type
    public class MyAccessConnection : MyConnection
    {
        public MyAccessConnection()
        {   sqlConnectionHandle =  new OleDbConnection();   }

        public override string GetConnectionString()
        {   return "Your Connection String from AppSettings.. any changes if OleDb vs SQL"; }

        public override IDbCommand GetSQLDbCommand()
        {   return new OleDbCommand( "", (OleDbConnection)sqlConnectionHandle ); }

        public override IDbDataParameter AddDbParmSpecificValue(string ParmName, object UnknownValue)
        {   return new OleDbParameter( ParmName, UnknownValue );    }

    }

    public class MySQLConnection : MyConnection
    {
        public MySQLConnection()
        {   sqlConnectionHandle = new SqlConnection();  }

        public override string GetConnectionString()
        { return "Your Connection String from AppSettings... any alterations needed??? "; }

        public override IDbCommand GetSQLDbCommand()
        { return new SqlCommand ("", (SqlConnection)sqlConnectionHandle); }

        public override IDbDataParameter AddDbParmSpecificValue(string ParmName, object UnknownValue)
        { return new SqlParameter(ParmName, UnknownValue); }
    }



    // Now to implement... pick one... Access or SQL-Server for derivation...
    public class MyDataLayer : MyAccessConnection
    {
        public void SomeSQLCall()
        {
            IDbCommand sqlcmd = GetSQLDbCommand();
            sqlcmd.CommandText = "UPDATE TileTypes SET Title = @Title, "
                                + "Picture = @Picture, "
                                + "Color = @Color "
                                + "WHERE ID = @ID";
            sqlcmd.Parameters.Add( AddDbParmSpecificValue( "@Title", titleTextBox.Text.Trim() ));
            sqlcmd.Parameters.Add( AddDbParmSpecificValue( "@Picture", typePictureBox.ImageLocation) );
            sqlcmd.Parameters.Add( AddDbParmSpecificValue( "@Color", colorButton.BackColor.ToArgb()) );
            sqlcmd.Parameters.Add( AddDbParmSpecificValue(  "@ID", id));

        if( SqlExecNonQuery(sqlcmd))
            // Good to go
            DoSomethingWithTheData;
        else
            // Notify of whatever error thrown....

        }
    }
}

So.. as you can see, my last class specifically is derived from EITHER Access OR SQL. Then, I can create my methods to get data, call updates, whatever. Get a SQL Command (which returns proper type and automatically is attached to its corresponding "Connection Handle" object, prepare the text, add your parameters, execute it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, looks great. It may take me a little while to test it out and get back and accept your answer. –  Root Feb 5 '13 at 4:55

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