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How do I ask a yes or no question in C?

The code is supposed to take the users name and make it a string (which works). Afterwards it continues and asks the user if they're ready to start their journey (it's going to be a simple text adventure game).

This, unfortunately, does not work. I'm unable to ask a yes/no question because I don't know how. Google searches and searching StackOverflow didn't help me either.

This is what I have thus far:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{

/*This declares the strings*/

char name[20];
char yesno[3];
char choice[1];

/*This tells the user that they should only use Y/N when responding to Yes or No questions.*/

printf("When responding to Yes or No questions use Y/N.\n");

/*This asks the user what their name is and allows the program to use it as a string for the rest of the program*/  

printf("Hello! What is your name?\n");
scanf("%s",name);

printf("Hello %s, are you ready for your journey?\n",name);
scanf("%c",choice);


char choice, 'Y';
while (choice != 'N' && choice == 'Y')
    {
        printf("Okay!Let's continue %s.\n",name);
    }
char choice,'N';
while (choice != 'Y' && choice == 'N')
    {
        printf("Goodbye.\n");
    }


return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
The notation char choice, 'Y'; is not valid C. However, why aren't you able to read a yes or no response? Are you seeking to read it without the user hitting return to end the line of input? If so, you will need to use a system-specific mechanism to read the answer — and you need to identify which system you're working on since the answer varies depending on the system. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 3 '13 at 3:06

4 Answers 4

char[80] choice;
fgets(choice, sizeof(choice), stdin);

if (choice[0] == 'Y' || choice[0] == 'y')
{
    printf("Okay!Let's continue %s.\n",name);
}
else
{
    printf("Goodbye.\n");
    exit(0);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the response, can you further go into where these would be placed within the code? I'm having a bit of trouble getting it to work and it may be because I don't know exactly where to put this code. –  nicereddy Feb 3 '13 at 5:26
    
I got it work by removing the "exit(0);" and placing the [80] after choice in your first suggestion. Once again thanks for your help! I'll look up choices now to get some more information on them. –  nicereddy Feb 3 '13 at 5:33
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int letterinput(const char *validchars) {
    int ch;
    do ch = getchar(); while ((ch != EOF) && !strchr(validchars, ch));
    return ch;
}

int main(void) {
    int x;
    printf("Enter Y/N: ");
    fflush(stdout);
    x = letterinput("nNyY");
    if (x != EOF) {
        if ((x == 'y') || (x == 'Y')) {
            printf("YES!\n");
        } else {
            printf("no :(\n");
        }
    } else {
        printf("You didn't answer\n");
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

I see a few possible issues:

printf("Hello %s, are you ready for your journey?\n",name); scanf("%c",choice);

1) Scanf requires addresses to store the scanned input, & since you have specified arrays, giving the array name as an argument works for 'name,' which has room for 20 chars (remember that C uses the NULL ('\0') character to mark the end of strings). Giving the array name produces the addr of the start of the array, which you want, but you declared 'choice' as an array of one char. It can't hold any nonempty string because the terminating '\0' fills the array. I'd recommend just using a char & giving 'scanf' its addr, thus:

char choice;
...
scanf("%c", &choice);
...
if (choice=='Y' [etc.]

If you simply must use an array, remember that 'choice' give the address of the first element, so to test the char, you need '*choice' or 'choice[0]' (they are the same).

So: ... if (*choice == 'y' || *choice == 'Y')...

or: ... if (choice[0] ...

BTW the func's 'toupper(int c) & tolower(int c) can save typing when you're testing a lot of chars: c=(char) tolower((int) c); if (c == 'y') ...else if (c == 'z') [etc.] (you may get by without the casts).

-- also, when someone types in a name longer than 19 chars, scanf will store them in memory after the name array, probably wiping out some other data. In fact this may be your problem. Using scanf("%19s", name) will fix that (you should also make sure that yesno gets @ most two chars).

[edit:] To take it further: if you want to loop until you get valid input, you need to do something like:

...
printf("Are you truly ready to embark on your journey (y/n)? ");  
scanf("%c", &choice); /* 'choice' defined as char, not vector */  
while (!strchr("nNyY", choice)) { /* bad input, reprompt */  
    printf("Please enter either 'y' or 'n': ");  
    scanf("%c", &choice);  
}  
if (choice=='y' || choice=='Y') {  
    printf("Well met, %s, thou brave soul!\n", name);  
    /* etc. */  
}  
else {  
    printf("Goodbye!\n");  
    /* etc */  
}  

I will confess that I haven't tested this code, but this is where I'd start. Hope it helps...
Regards, Ed

share|improve this answer
1  
good description. –  Dipak Feb 3 '13 at 4:28

Delete the lines

char choice, 'Y';

and

char choice, 'Z';

Change

==

to

.equals()
share|improve this answer
3  
.equals() is NEVER valid C unless you are dealing with a struct that contains a function pointer, which the OP obviously isn't. –  Richard J. Ross III Feb 3 '13 at 3:16
2  
C is not Java .. –  Aniket Feb 3 '13 at 3:19

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