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I want to use objectoriented Javascript, but the behaviour of my "object" is not as I expect them to be.

This is my object:

var Test = function(a){
    var variable = a;

    this.getA = function(){
        return this.variable;
    }

    this.setA = function(a){
        this.variable = a;
    }
}

Now I run this code:

var a = new Test("foo");
var b = new Test("bar");

alert(a.getA());                //undefined, but "foo" expected
alert(a.getA() == b.getA());    //true, but false expected

alert(a.variable);              //undefined, as expected

a.variable = "whatever";
alert(a.getA());                //"whatever", but undefined expected
alert(a.variable);              //"whatever", but undefined expected

a.setA("somewhere");
alert(a.getA());                //"somewhere", as expected
alert(a.variable);              //"somewhere", but undefined expected

Does anyone know how to create a functioning object, without the need to call "setA(a)" at the beginning, and with object encapsulation not allowing a.variable = "whatever";?

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1  
On what are you basing your expectations? var variable has no direct relationship to this.variable –  the system Feb 3 '13 at 3:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you're encapsulating the value of a, you don't need to use this.variable to access the value, simply changing this.variable to variable should fix the issue.

Variables have functional scope, so var variable defines a variable that is in scope not only for Test, but also for setA and getA:

var Test = function(a){
    var variable = a;

    this.getA = function(){
        //you want to access the variable,
        //not the property on the instance
        return variable;

    }

    this.setA = function(a){
        variable = a;
    }
}
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Interesting what a "this" does sometimes. ;-D Thanks a lot! –  Marcus Feb 3 '13 at 3:38

Any this referenced in JS is going to be publicly accessible.

However, thanks to the concept of closure, you can have a fully private state, just by declaring variables (or functions) inside of your function.

Moreover, unless you're looking to get prototypical with your coding, you don't even need the new, there, nor do you need the this.

An example:

var makePerson = function (secret) {

    var is_alive = true,

        sayName = function () {
            if (!is_alive) { return; }
            console.log("My name is " + secret.name + ".");
        },

        sayAge = function () {
            if (!is_alive) { return; }
            console.log("My age is " + secret.age + ".");
        },

        haveBirthday = function () {
            if (!is_alive) { return; }
            secret.name += 1;
            console.log("I'm " + secret.name + 
                        ", and today I turned " + secret.age + ".");
        },

        die = function () {
            is_alive = false;
            console.log(secret.name + " died today;" +
                        " they were " + secret.age + " year" +
                        (secret.age > 1 ? "s" : "") + " old."   );
        },

        public_interface = { sayName      : sayName,
                             sayAge       : sayAge,
                             haveBirthday : haveBirthday,
                             die          : die           };

    return public_interface;
};


var bob = makePerson({ name : "Bob", age : 32 });

Nobody can touch secret.name, secret.age or is_alive from the outside.

bob.name; // undefined
bob.is_alive = false;  // Doesn't matter -- the code isn't relying on a public property.


bob.sayAge();       // "My age is 32"
bob.haveBirthday(); // "I'm Bob, and today I turned 33"
bob.die();          // "Bob died today; they were 33 years old"

Even better, JS allows you to change assignments at any time, so you might be worried about something like this:

// person overwriting the function
bob.haveBirthday = function () { is_alive = false; };

...but there is absolutely no reason to fear somebody doing that, because they have no access to those internal properties.

bob.haveBirthday(); // window.is_alive = false;
bob.sayAge(); "My age is 33";

Likewise if you try to rewrite a function to steal a value:

bob.sayName = function () { return secret.name; };
bob.sayName(); // window.secret.name;  OR  ERROR: can't call `name` of `undefined`

ANY functions which are not defined INSIDE of the function have NO access to the internal properties or methods.

And you can have private methods in the exact same way -- in fact, all of those functions were private, until I attached them all to the public_interface object (which is what I returned).

This is important to remember if you start using prototype.

var Thing = function (secret) {};
Thing.prototype.sayName = function () { console.log("My name is " + secret.name); };
var thing = new Thing({ name : "Bob", age : 32 });

thing.sayName(); // "My name is undefined"

Not even prototype functions have access to private state -- they MUST use public state (through this).

There are more-complex structures that you could use, making multiple closures to have public, private, private static and public static (which is what prototype is most like) properties, but that's a little more advanced and in the beginning, a little more confusing.

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Incredible, that's exactly the kind of JS code I don't understand at all. Maybe I learn this in the future. ;) In the meanwhile, I still use "new" since this exists since Javascript 1.2 and is a very easy aproach. +1 for using fast arrays in Javascript. I personally use arrays (JSON) for datastructures (model), but rather normal objects for controllers. While I don't see a purpose for JS objects for any model (well, arrays are objects too, aren't they?), I also can't see why the command "new" should be a bad thing for e.g. local event handler objects ("local"=permanent in the browser client). –  Marcus Feb 3 '13 at 4:16
    
These aren't "fast-arrays", they're objects. Unlike other languages where you have to make a class to have an object, in JS, you just go {} and you've got an object. And EVERYTHING in JS is an object, including functions. This is why var func = function () {}; func.properties = {}; works. func(); works. func.properties.num = 12; works. And new isn't the issue (but can cause HUGE problems if you use this and forget to call new), not understanding or using any private state, when it's needed is the problem. If you never need private state, then no worries, I guess. –  Norguard Feb 3 '13 at 4:28
    
Nope. It's an object. If I had var Thing = function () {}; and var makeThing = function () { return {}; };, and I called var a = new Thing(), b = makeThing(); aside from the ability to set a prototype ("public static" properties/methods) on Thing, and a.constructor; pointing back to Thing, they do pretty much the exact same thing. If you forget to call new on a constructor, though, instead of returning a new object ({}) with public properties/methods, it sets those properties on window... ...whoops! –  Norguard Feb 3 '13 at 4:38
    
public_interface is no array? Well then...but I think it is rather an array, because arrays were the first object ever since. ;) For me: "object" = providing methods to access local variables, "array" = basic data structure for storing data (without any methods except the basic method provideds by the framework itself, methods which are usually very fast). But yeah, Javascript is indeed a very flexible language and you can do everything, literally, but that doesn't provide a better understanding of the code from other programmers. –  Marcus Feb 3 '13 at 4:41
    
@Marcus : public_interface in my example is a JavaScript object which has methods attached (they're all functions). Those methods have access to public-state (global or this), but ALSO have access to private state. There is not a single "data" object attached to the public_interface object. That is, in fact, why I called it public_interface in my example... ...because it's extending that public interface with private access to whatever variable you're assigning it to. This is more like Java/C/etc than most JS implementations. –  Norguard Feb 3 '13 at 4:42

Just for fun (or for demonstration purpose), I found another solution in the meanwhile:

var Test = function(x){
    var variables = function(){}
    variables.variable = x; 

    this.getA = function(){
        return variables.variable;
    }

    this.setA = function(x){
        variables.variable = x;
    }
}

The test results:

    var a = new Test("foo");
    var b = new Test("baz");

    alert(a.getA());                //"foo" as expected
    alert(a.getA() == b.getA());    //false as expected

    a.variable = "whatever";
    alert(a.getA());                //"foo" as expected
    alert(a.variable);              //"whatever", doesn't seem preventable

    a.setA("somewhere");
    alert(a.getA());                //"somewhere", as expected
    alert(a.variable);              //"whatever", doesn't seem preventable
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