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Python 2.7.3

From the console:

>>> try:
...     fsock = open("something_that_does_not_exist")
... except IOError:
...     print "The file does not exist"
... print "Let's keep going"
Traceback (  File "<interactive input>", line 5
    print "Let's keep going"
        ^
SyntaxError: invalid syntax

If I save the same code into a script:

ex.py

def try1():
    try:
        fsock = open("something_that_does_not_exist")
    except IOError:
        print "The file does not exist"
    print "Let's keep going"

and run it:

>>> import ex
>>> ex.try1()
The file does not exist
Let's keep going
>>> 

I tried this on the console, IDLE and PythonWin. Same results.

What's the difference?

EDIT:

I am learning Python with, among other sources, "Dive into Python" (http://www.diveintopython.net/). In example 6.1 the author shows exactly this example being run form the command line: http://www.diveintopython.net/file_handling/index.html

That's why I thought this should work.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have to finish the try except block. If you add another line in between, the interpreter won't mess up. The reason is it thinks the print statement is part of the try, which it isn't. So if you finish the except statement, and let that part run and then paste the next print statement it will work.

>>> try:
...     fsock = open("something_that_does_not_exist")
... except IOError:
...     print "The file does not exist"
...
<output is here>

Then add this statement in:

>>> print "Let's keep going"

Pasting into the python interpreter doesn't always work for a bunch of reasons similar to this. The interpreter is meant for testing random snippets of code, and you cannot expect that pasting huge functions will always work when put in.

As you can see, this is the same thing:

>>> try:
...     print 'hi'
... except:
...     print 'yo'
... print 'hi'
  File "<stdin>", line 5
    print 'hi'
        ^
SyntaxError: invalid syntax
>>> 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your explanation. See my edit of the original question for clarification as to why I am doing this. I can understand that the interpreter will not run everything exactly as it might run off a script (although this seems a little weird). But, how is it that it worked for the book's author? –  martin's Feb 3 '13 at 4:35
    
There may be some artistic license there. –  m.brindley Feb 3 '13 at 5:06
    
Well that is interesting, maybe the author used a different version of Python? –  yentup Feb 3 '13 at 5:21
    
Don't know. I'll contact him and see. For now, I'll accept your answer. –  martin's Feb 3 '13 at 20:36

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