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It's unclear to me from the C++11 standard where user-defined hash<T> functors should be defined.

For example, in 23.5.2 Header <unordered_map>, it shows:

template <class Key,
        class T,
        class Hash = hash<Key>,
        class Pred = std::equal_to<Key>,
        class Alloc = std::allocator<std::pair<const Key, T> > >
    class unordered_map;

This suggests that, by default, hash<T> is searched for in the global namespace, whereas equal_to<> is searched for in the std namespace.

Why the difference in namespace between hash<> and equal_to<>?

(Actually, in the description at http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/unordered_map/unordered_map/, neither specifies the std namespace.)

Thus, when defining a hash<> functor for a user type, should we enclose it within a namespace std { } block, or can it remain in the current namespace?

If the code does not have a using namespace std;, how do the STL containers like unordered_map know to look in the std namespace for the predefined hash<> functors associated with the primitive types? It seems like the default Hash = hash<Key> would fail to find these.

Sorry if these are stupid questions..

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1  
Consider reading this and this –  Rapptz Feb 3 '13 at 6:27
    
I now found a very nice discussion in open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/papers/2012/n3333.html , which points out how awkward it is to introduce namespace std { } and proposes an extension hash_value() to the C++11 standard. –  Hugues Feb 4 '13 at 18:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

First of all, there is no "argument dependent lookup" for templates. So hash<Key> will always refer to the same template, either in std or in global namespace, independent of Key. If it had resolved to different templates in different translation units, it would cause undefined behavior by ODR violation. This alone suggests that hash here means std::hash, that is as-if unordered_map was declared like this:

namespace std {
    template<class T> struct hash;

    template <class Key,
        class T,
        class Hash = hash<Key>,    // resolves to std::hash<Key> for all Keys
        class Pred = std::equal_to<Key>,
        class Alloc = std::allocator<std::pair<const Key, T> > >
    class unordered_map;
}

However, the types declared in the standard headers are not required to be written in source (they could be in principle built-in to the compiler or pre-compiled by some other magic). The standard requires each standard header to declare only the types in its synopsis, which means that by omitting the std::hash declaration the standard permits some hypothetical implementation to avoid the above namespace pollution. This explains why you do not see the above declaration in the synopsis.

To further back-up the above conclusion, we go to §20.8.12 Class template hash [unord.hash] that reads:

The unordered associative containers defined in 23.5 use specializations of the class template hash as the default hash function.

This paragraph refers to the std::hash, which we can infer from the synopsis of <functional>.

Bottom line: This is an inconsistency in the standard formatting. There are plenty of inconsistencies, so this specific case is not surprising at all. In such cases one has to understand what has been intended by deducing what is the only sensible thing.

Specialization. You specialize templates in the namespace that they were declared. You are explicitly granted the right to specialize standard templates for your own type:

namespace std {
    template<> struct hash<YourClass> {
        // specialization goes here
    };
}
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Certain standard types which are explicitly allowed, not all of them. –  Xeo Feb 3 '13 at 8:06
1  
@Xeo: the other way around: "A program may add a template specialization for any standard library template to namespace std only if the declaration depends on a user-defined type and the specialization meets the standard library requirements for the original template and is not explicitly prohibited." §17.6.4.2.1 –  ybungalobill Feb 3 '13 at 8:37
    
Instead of fixing the inconsistent use of the namespace prefix all over the standard, the committee just added a quick Whenever a name x defined in the standard library is mentioned, the name x is assumed to be fully qualified as ::std::x, unless explicitly described otherwise. to §17.6.1.1 –  Bo Persson Feb 3 '13 at 12:00

when you want to define a hash functor for your type, just put it into your namespace and instantiate unordered_xxx with it -- pretty simple...

namespace my {
struct some_type {/*...*/};
struct some_hasher {/*...*/};
}

typedef std::unordered_map<int, my::some_type, my::some_hasher> my_some_hash_map;

AFAIK it is not recommended (and obviously unsafe) to add smth into std namespace. and actually it is not required (in my experience I can't recall when I want to add smth into std -- it is always possible to solve a "problem" not doing this)

And btw:

This suggests that, by default, hash is searched for in the global namespace, whereas equal_to<> is searched for in the std namespace.

WRONG! Consider this:

namespace my {
// See declaration of some_type above...
template <
    typename SomeType = some_type
  , typename Alloc = std::allocator<SomeType>
  >
struct test;
}

obviously, some_type would be searched in the current namespace!

Thus, when defining a hash<> functor for a user type, should we enclose it within a namespace std { } block, or can it remain in the current namespace?

No! Do not try to reduce symbols count to type by providing a template specialization for std::hash<YourType> -- just write your own hash functor in your namespace and add it as a template parameter when instantiate std::unordered_xxx...

Follow this simple rule: avoid to add smth into a namespace which is not under your control (ALL namespaces! not only std...) Except cases, when it is required (by some library) explicitly.

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