Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm using Java and JBoss7 with RESTEasy. I have created my RESTful service and a client to test my service:

ClientRequest request = new ClientRequest(
         "http://localhost:8080/test/rest/cars");
request.accept(MediaType.APPLICATION_XML);

String input = "<car><carId>10.99</carId><carName>Ford</carName></car>";

request.body(MediaType.APPLICATION_XML, input);
ClientResponse<String> response = request.post(String.class);
System.out.println("Output from Server .... \n");
System.out.println(response.getStatus());

This works perfectly! The only issue here is in the client. I have to send hard coded XML like you can see in String input = "<car><carId>10.99</carId><carName>Ford</carName></car>"; since the client doesn't have the objects I have.

The client would mimic the XML representation that it received from the get method, which can be difficult to do with a large and complex resource.

  • Is there a way that the client would know the correct structure of the object they want to send or do they have to send typed XML?

  • can I give the client something similar to a WSDL or an XSD or that would be against the constraints of REST ?

  • I've seen solutions where people would use Xsteam and unmarshalling but they assume that the client have the class representation of the resource.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Don't hardcode XML messages in the client code. XML is what gets passed around between the service and client.

Let's hypothetically think of a situation where you have the same service exposed at to different locations and one only understands the XML format while the other only understands JSON. If you are to use your client with hardcoded messages you will be able to call only the service that talks XML. Remember REST is about representations of resources.

since the client doesn't have the objects I have. The client would mimic the XML representation that he received from the get method, which can be difficult to do with a large and complex resource.

Is there a way that the client would know the correct structure of the object they want to send or do they have to send typed XML?

Consider that your client is a Java application which normally work with objects. The objects represent the resources (e.g. car) and that's what your client uses internally.

When it's time to call the service you just marshal these objects to XML. When service responds you unmarshal the XML into objects.

Based on the Accept and Content-Type headers used it's then just a matter of selecting the appropriate marshaller/unmarshaller. You can then even send something as XML and receive it back as JSON.

Sure, RESTeasy clients can make use of the same annotations as on the service side and it's even possible to reuse some Java types (classes) in between the service and the client but those Java classes become useless when the client is written in some other technology: C#, Python, C++ etc.

Why should a client care about the types the service uses? It should care only about the representations. Internally the client can use whatever types it wants (independent of the service) and just communicate with the proper representation when it's time to talk to the service.

can I give the client something similar to a WSDL or an xsd or that would be against the constraints of REST ?

This gets a little bit tricky.

REST is a software architectural style for building distributed systems. Unfortunately different people understand this "style" differently and as a result there is a plethora of so called RESTful APIs out there that simply describe what methods to use, on what URLs, and what "types" to send back on forward.

This is the wrong way of doing REST as emphasized by Roy T. Fielding himself: REST APIs must be hypertext-driven.

A RESTful client needs no prior knowledge of what URLs to access or what "types" to use for the communication. Understanding of the media types used in the exchange is all it needs (and I'm not talking application/xml which only says something about the format of the message with no semantics or description about what's inside).

As a result why should a service provide a WSDL? Actually (although WSDL 2.0 can describe RESTful services) it's in fact a WADL we are talking about. But the REST community hasn't actually made it's mind about WADL so this too is a matter of "style".

If you are doing REST "by the book" then a WADL shouldn't be necessary. If you in fact only have a HTTP based interface, I assume you could provide a WADL to ease other programmers lives when developing a client.

I've seen solutions where people would use Xsteam and unmarshalling but they assume that the client have the class representation of the resource.

RESTeasy has support for JAXB marshalling so that should work with little effort.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.