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import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService;
import java.util.concurrent.Executors;
import java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit;

public class Main
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        final ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(10);
        executor.execute(new Runnable()
        {
            @Override
            public void run()
            {
                for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
                    executor.execute(new Runnable()
                    {
                        @Override
                        public void run()
                        {
                             System.out.println("run");
                        }
                    });
            }
        });
        executor.shutdown();
        try
        {
            executor.awaitTermination(Long.MAX_VALUE, TimeUnit.NANOSECONDS);
        }
        catch (InterruptedException e)
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

I getRejectedExecutionException because of inner executor.execute called after shutdown. How can I wait executor in this case?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have to know when there will be no more tasks. It's not something which it can guess for you. Move the shutdown into the first task and it will behave as you expect. i.e. only call shutdown when you know you are not going to add more tasks.

An alternative is to use a

final ExecutorService executor = new ThreadPoolExecutor(0, 10, 1, TimeUnit.SECONDS, new LinkedBlockingQueue<Runnable>());

This won't shutdown the executor, but it will stop all the threads and you can discard the executor when you don't need it any more. Note: should you add more tasks later, it will start threads as required.

final ThreadPoolExecutor executor = new ThreadPoolExecutor(10, 10, 100, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS, new LinkedBlockingQueue<Runnable>());
for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
    executor.submit(new Callable<Void>() {
        @Override
        public Void call() throws Exception {
            Thread.sleep(2);
            return null;
        }
    });
while (executor.getQueue().size() > 0) {
    System.out.println("Queue " + executor.getQueue().size() + ", Pool size " + executor.getPoolSize());
    Thread.sleep(200);
}
executor.setCorePoolSize(0);
while (executor.getPoolSize() > 0) {
    System.out.println("Pool size " + executor.getPoolSize());
    Thread.sleep(200);
}
System.out.println("Pool size " + executor.getPoolSize());

prints

Queue 946, Pool size 10
Queue 32, Pool size 10
Pool size 10
Pool size 0

and then exits. Note: if any thread were still running the program wouldn't exit.

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I post this code for example. In my program more than 2 levels of calls and I can't know when tasks will end. After first execute there is 1 task in queue and I would like know when queue will become empty. –  eXXXXXXXXXXX Feb 3 '13 at 8:51
    
If you don't know when you don't want to add more tasks, nobody does ;) You can use a counter if you know the number of tasks which might add tasks and when the last task exist you can call shutdown. e.g. Start with ai = new AtomicInteger(50); or what ever the size is and using if (ai.decrementAndGet() == 0) executor.shutdown(); –  Peter Lawrey Feb 3 '13 at 8:54
    
I thought there are some tools in Java for it. Apparently I need custom solution like yours. Thank you anyway) –  eXXXXXXXXXXX Feb 3 '13 at 8:59
    
There is no way for Java to determine you are not going to add a task later. –  Peter Lawrey Feb 3 '13 at 9:07
    
anytime queue size >= 1 (while tasks are executing). I need shutdown when queue size will become 0. It means that there are no more tasks –  eXXXXXXXXXXX Feb 3 '13 at 9:12
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