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I know why GCC doesn't re-order members of a structure by default, but I seldom write code that relies on the order of the structure, so is there some way I can flag my structures to be automaticly reordered?

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@H2CO3 Because I'm on a tight-memory system, and I always have to do calculations by hand to make sure the least amount of padding is used. –  Muis Feb 3 '13 at 9:54
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@Joshua Does your architecture allow unaligned memory access ? –  cnicutar Feb 3 '13 at 9:57
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@cnicutar I believe so, but turning them into packed structures is not the answer, because it will just remove the padding, but does not re-order for optimal memory-aligned. I want what I do manually: memory-aligned with the least amount of padding. –  Muis Feb 3 '13 at 10:01
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@Joshua Oh I see. You want to have the cake and eat it. Perhaps you could preprocess (flex ?) your files and rearrange the members. –  cnicutar Feb 3 '13 at 10:04
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Assuming your platform uses ELF, you can use pahole from dwarves to find structures that may be reordered, and also automatically repack these. –  Hasturkun Feb 3 '13 at 10:44
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There is no such option in GCC. And, I sure, it can not be introduced in any sensible fashion. About padding optimizations please look at this discussion.

The only exception I know is hot/cold structure fields splitting, that can be done in some cases (still I am not sure, that GCC can do it even in profile-guided mode, I know ICC can). This feature is not under user control and is performed on call-graphs where conservativeness of such transformation over data-flow is provable.

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Why could it not be introduced? If I specify the __packed attribute, I'm telling GCC to threat the structure differently, so what would be wrong with a __reorder attribute? But it seems my question is a duplicate of the question you linked. –  Muis Feb 3 '13 at 10:15
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@Joshua From memory the C standard specifies that struct members must be ordered in memory the same as the order in definition. Using the packed attribute preserves ordering. A reorder attribute would not. I realise this is not a discussion about standard compliance though. –  Austin Phillips Feb 3 '13 at 10:26
    
I think reason why it could not be introduced is deeper, then just standard compliance. At least we do not care much about packed structures, nested functions, etc. But packed is up to user. Reorder lefts it up to compiler how to reorder and whether reorder or not. So, being introduced, it will require on possible reordering of fields, accurate points-to analysis to reorder all references as well, and references to references, and so on. This will probably multiply time of compilation several times. –  Konstantin Vladimirov Feb 3 '13 at 10:42
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@KonstantinVladimirov It's not only the standard compliance. C and C++ programs are routinely built from a number of different source files and libraries. You cannot change the order or packing once the library has been compiled. And you don't want to have differently ordered members in the same structure in different modules. –  Alexey Frunze Feb 3 '13 at 10:46
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