Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to select a database for a project. I think my best bet is a NoSQL solution like MongoDB or Cassandra, but I don't have experience with such systems.

Requirements for the project are:

  • Main table is an aggregate that will initially have 3 to 4 hundred million records, but there should be room to grow further.
  • The amount of columns is not huge, about 200.
  • The data will be somewhat sparse, but not so much so that a traditional model is out of the question.
  • Schema updates will occur weekly.
  • Inserts will not be very frequent, probably not more than a million a day.
  • Updates will be very frequent for 10 to 20% of the records, up to every few minutes.
  • Queries over the entire set will be very frequent. All queries will be over several attributes and will use range values. In general they will have this form: select * from huge_table where string in ('x','y') and integer=1 and currency between 1,05 and 100,00 and date > 2012-01-01 00:00:00.
  • updates and queries do not have to be processed at the same time. There is rome to process a batch of inserts and updates first and a batch of queries a few minutes later.
  • There is no requirement to support complex data types.
  • SQL support is not required.
  • Transactions are not required.
  • Data loss is undesirable, but not catastrophic.
  • System will be implemented in a single data centre.
  • Hardware cost themselves are not so much of a problem but I need to be able to scale hardware very gradually. So a system that runs on more or less standard web servers is preferable. If it can run on VMs, even better.

Based on these requirements I'm leaning towards MongoDB. But I'm hesitating. Once I make the choice I'll be stuck with it for a long time. Any advice is much appreciated.

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by WiredPrairie, Sammaye, Tyler Hobbs, Theo, Graviton Feb 7 '13 at 7:03

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Don't make a choice without building some POCs, especially given your comment that you can't switch later. This question isn't a good fit for StackOverflow as it stands. –  WiredPrairie Feb 3 '13 at 13:18
    
^so much this. Deciding without proper POCing and eval is just begging for failure. –  moodywoody Feb 4 '13 at 5:14
    
With 10% of 300 million records changed every five minutes there will be 100,000 changes per second. Are you sure your numbers are real? –  Theo Feb 4 '13 at 14:03
    
@Theo Such are my clients requirements. I cannot fully assess how real these are, but based on their business I don't find them unlikely. –  stevenvr Feb 4 '13 at 14:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Normally your question would be classed as too subjective and in fact it is. I will, however, put an answer regardless that will hopefully help you out a little.

My answer will be MongoDB based since that is the tech I have the most knowledge about.

Main table is an aggregate that will initially have 3 to 4 hundred million records, but there should be room to grow further.

This is pretty easy for any database, let me know when you start getting billions of rows.

Updates will be very frequent for 10 to 20% of the records, up to every few minutes.

I have no clue what queries you will perform however if you intend to increase the documents size dramatically using these updates then you might find fragmentation unless you use pre-alloc of your documents fields or http://docs.mongodb.org/manual/reference/command/collMod/#usePowerOf2Sizes which will ensure that MongoDB always has enough contiguous free space within a record object to update it without needing to move it.

This is because unlike many other techs (like SQL) MongoDB does not split record objects across the disk, instead it houses the document all within one contiguous block of space.

If you wish to learn more about how MongoDBs storage mechanisms could impact your datasets performance you can look through this presentation: http://www.10gen.com/presentations/storage-engine-internals which I still consider to be the most authoritative explanation around.

Queries over the entire set will be very frequent. All queries will be over several attributes and will use range values. In general they will have this form: select * from huge_table where string in ('x','y') and integer=1 and currency between 1,05 and 100,00 and date > 2012-01-01 00:00:00.

MongoDB has a good "caching" mechanism for data. I put the caching into speech marks because MongoDB technically has NO query caching however all of its data in Virtual Memory mapped (not RAM mapped, that is completely different).

When you do the same query regularly you can find that your working set, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Working_set which defines how much data you require within a specific interval for performant operation of MongoDB, will be entirely in RAM. This means that all of your queries can be served directly from RAM making them super fast (techs like Redis and Memcached serve from RAM for example).

There is no requirement to support complex data types.

MongoDB does not require complex data types but they can be added if you find out later on that you actually want them: http://docs.mongodb.org/manual/core/document/#bson-type-considerations it is however (as that page says) good to take the field types supplied with MongoDB into consideration. A good example is that it would be wise to use the built in date type within MongoDB so that you have easy access to date operators within your querying.

Data loss is undesirable, but not catastrophic.

MongoDB is considered to have strong consistency (not immediate unlike SQL though) when reading from secondaries and other replica members both in and outside of a single data centre ( http://docs.mongodb.org/manual/replication/ ), added that it is capable of doing replica acked writes as well (which adds to the strong consistency), this makes it very good if one node were to fail and automatic failover were to occur, there is a lessened chance that your dataset will be adversely effected (you would get more problems in an eventually consistent environment like CouchDBs in this particular case).

Added that MongoDB does have a journal and oplog to help it keep data nice, clean and filed away properly.

Hardware cost themselves are not so much of a problem but I need to be able to scale hardware very gradually. So a system that runs on more or less standard web servers is preferable. If it can run on VMs, even better.

MongoDB is very capable of running on commodity hardware so this shouldn't be a problem.

That should provide some pointers for you to get on with.

share|improve this answer

I didn't work With Cassandra But MongoDB is good For This Requirements And You Must Have a Good Server With High Density Of Ram or cloud server

see This

MongoDB vs. Cassandra

http://kkovacs.eu/cassandra-vs-mongodb-vs-couchdb-vs-redis

share|improve this answer

Check couchbase (http://www.couchbase.com/). After the research, I'm just starting playing with this engine. It seems to be really good (flexibility, scalability, API, etc.), and installation can be done in a few minutes.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.