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For school I had to make a JFrame and within that One button and Two textfields. Whatever you put in Textfield one have to get into textfield two when the button is pressed. I got the code to the point I should see the textfields and the button when i run the program. For whatever reason it doesn't.

My come so far:

package helloworld;

import javax.swing.*;
import java.awt.event.*; 

    public class HelloWorld extends JFrame {

        public static void main(String[] args) {

             JFrame frame = new HelloWorld();
             frame.setSize(400, 400);
             frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
             frame.setTitle("Hello World Button App");

             JPanel panel = new JPanel();
             frame.setContentPane(panel);
             fram.setVisible(true);
         }
       }

       class panel extends JPanel {

          public JButton btn1 = new JButton("Klick!");
          public JTextField txt1 = new JTextField(10);
          public JTextField txt2 = new JTextField(10);

          public panel() {
               add(btn1);
               add(txt1);
               add(txt2);
            }
          }

I am not yet allowed to post images but I will provide a link to the picture down here

I am sorry if this question allready exests but i couldnt's find a similar question. I am new to programming so please dont yell at me when I forgot something or wrote something wrong in it!

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fram.setVisible(true); should be frame.setVisible.. –  Koray Tugay Feb 3 '13 at 12:03
1  
Don't extend JFrame. I have yet to see a case where it makes sense to do so. Jut create an instance and add the GUI to it. –  Andrew Thompson Feb 3 '13 at 12:22
    
@AndrewThompson I think it makes sense when defining our owm components? May be! –  joey rohan Feb 3 '13 at 13:50
    
@joeyrohan Challenge. Show me a convincing SSCCE where the only way to achieve the effect is to extend JFrame. The answer will be considered invalid if I can reproduce the effect shown (and it is not simply a 'dumb' effect), without extending frame. –  Andrew Thompson Feb 3 '13 at 15:03
    
@AndrewThompson for sure you can reproduce the same effect.And i also know its a dumb thing to extend JFrame.But suppose if creating multiple instances, like new ClassExtendsJFrame().setVisible(true); // first window new ClassExtendsJFrame().setVisible(true); won't it be just little easy? –  joey rohan Feb 3 '13 at 15:16
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here i have modified your code a bit, but did in a similar way. I won't extend JFrame until and unless i don't want to do something creative, but you always CAN.

You had already extended JFrame , so no worth of calling methods with frame.foo() but simply foo() , and most important JFrame frame = new HelloWorld() , will make no sense, if you have already extended you class with JFrame:

enter image description here

import javax.swing.*;

public class HelloWorld extends JFrame{

 public static void main(String[] args) {

          SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
          public void run() {
          new HelloWorld().setVisible(true);
        }
    });

     }
    public  HelloWorld()
    {

        setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        setTitle("Hello World Button App");

        panel pan= new panel();
        add(pan.panel);
        pack();
        setVisible(true);
    }
   }

   class panel {

      private JButton btn1 = new JButton("Klick!");
      private JTextField txt1 = new JTextField(10);
      private JTextField txt2 = new JTextField(10);
      JPanel panel;
      public panel() {
           panel = new JPanel();
           panel.add(btn1);
           panel.add(txt1);
           panel.add(txt2);
        }
      }

Also, you can also extend your panel class with JPanel :

 public  HelloWorld()
    {

        setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        setTitle("Hello World Button App");

          panel pan= new panel();
         add(pan);
         pack();
         setVisible(true);
    }
   }

   class panel extends JPanel {

      private JButton btn1 = new JButton("Klick!");
      private JTextField txt1 = new JTextField(10);
      private JTextField txt2 = new JTextField(10);

      public panel() {

           add(btn1);
           add(txt1);
           add(txt2);
        }
      }
share|improve this answer
1  
Please learn java naming conventions and stick to them <tongue-in-cheek/> And extending JSomething is nearly always suboptimal, they are meant to be used as-are. –  kleopatra Feb 3 '13 at 14:34
    
You know why I did the extending and stuff like that? It was becouse the teacher on school learned me it that way :D I will try it thanks for you reply! –  Tom Schillemans Feb 3 '13 at 14:45
    
@kleopatra Yeah, very true.Just dint changed OP's code basic code. –  joey rohan Feb 3 '13 at 14:56
2  
@TomSchillemans As suggested by - kleopatra, "extending JSomething is nearly always suboptimal, they are meant to be used as-are" , you should tell this to your teacher, make use of JSomething as objects whenever possible, i din't changed the concept of your code, cause of your convenience, and don't forget the naming-conventions.Good Luck! –  joey rohan Feb 3 '13 at 15:00
    
:) +1 for "I won't extend JFrame until and unless i don't want to do something creative" ;) –  Andrew Thompson Feb 3 '13 at 15:06
show 9 more comments

That is because your class name is panel not JPanel

Modify this:

panel panel = new panel();
frame.setContentPane(panel);
frame.setVisible(true);

You should try to use names for your Class that are not so confusing, and try to declare them with uppercase.

Example:

Class Panel extends JPanel {}

Object:

Panel panel = new Panel()

Here you can clearly read which one is the class name and which is the object (instance of that class) of that class.

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1  
Op really shouldnt be extending JPanel if simply adding components –  David Kroukamp Feb 3 '13 at 13:06
    
@DavidKroukamp what's the harm? –  joey rohan Feb 3 '13 at 14:32
1  
@joeyrohan I would suggest you refresh your OO basics a bit :) –  kleopatra Feb 3 '13 at 14:59
    
When I tried this and tried to run it it gave me a Exception: Exception in thread "Main" Java.awt.IllegalComponentStateException: contentPane cannot be set to null. I have renamed all the Variables and in Netbeans itselfs it doesnt give any warnings only when I run the program. –  Tom Schillemans Feb 3 '13 at 15:01
    
@TomSchillemans let me guess..Null pointer? –  joey rohan Feb 3 '13 at 15:02
show 4 more comments

You declared a class called panel that you are not using anywhere. Please replace the line bwlow:

JPanel panel = new JPanel();

with:

SomePanel panel = new SomePanel();

Then, your class panel becomes SomePanel to follow correct class naming.

Some thoughts to help you:

  • Name your classes following the Java style
  • Don't use public fields
  • Set layouts on your panels. This time it worked for you as the default is FlowLayout.
share|improve this answer
    
So JPanel should be a variable? –  Tom Schillemans Feb 3 '13 at 14:43
    
JPanel is a class in the Java APIs. –  Dan Feb 3 '13 at 16:42
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