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I have two lists, one have a list of object A an other a list of objects B, like this:

ObjectA
{
    Int64 idObjectA;
    String name;
    ....
}

ObjectB
{
    Int64 idObjectB;
    Int64 idObjectA;
    String name;
    ....
}

I have two list, one with Object A and other with Object B. I want to create a new list C that have only objects B, which IDObjectA is any ID of the list A.

In SQL it would be somthing line that:

select * from B where IDObjectA IN(1,2,3,4...);

In my case, the list of values for the IN clause is the list of ObjectA, which have the property idObjectA.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The same with Join and without Contains:

var listC = listB.Join(listA, b => b.ObjectAId, a => a.Id, (b, a) => b).ToList();
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this solution has a linear o quadratic complexity? The only difference is the syntaxis? Thanks. –  Álvaro García Feb 3 '13 at 19:03
    
@Daimroc It is exactly same solution than mine (in O(n)). Raubi uses the LINQ extension methods syntax, I use the query-syntax. –  Cédric Bignon Feb 3 '13 at 19:09

You can use the Join linq method to achieve this by joining listB and listA by their idObjectA, then select itemB.

var result = (from itemB in listB
              join itemA in listA on itemB.idObjectA equals itemA.idObjectA
              select itemB).ToList();

This method has a linear complexity (O(n)). Using Where(... => ....Contains()) or double foreach has a quadratic complexity (O(n^2)).

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2  
Excellent answer, however in 99% of the cases, ToList is superfluous. (I'm assuming that the term List in the question was used to refer to any sequence IEnumerable<T> as opposed to a List<T>.) –  codesparkle Feb 3 '13 at 13:23
1  
The the solution from Gideon has a complexity in O(n^2), less efficient than mine. –  Cédric Bignon Feb 3 '13 at 18:58

This is slightly different way of doing it as opposed to a join.

List<ObjectA> listA = ..
List<ObjectB> listB = ..
int[] listAIds = listA.Select(a => a.idObjectA).ToList();
               //^^ this projects the list of objects into a list of ints

//It reads like this...

//get items in listB WHERE..
listB.Where(b => listAIds.Contains(b.idObjectA)).ToList();
//b.idObjectA is in listA, OR where listA contains b.idObjectA
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2  
If not optimized by the compiler this is a very heavy operation because for each item in listB the runtime constructs a new list with all ids of listA and additionally performs a linear search. –  Jasd Feb 3 '13 at 13:05
1  
You can simplify your expression with: listA.Any(a => a.idObjectA = b.idObjectA) (not to instanciate a list for each element in b). But this operations is still O(n^2). –  Cédric Bignon Feb 3 '13 at 13:06
2  
@Jasd Good catch!! I fixed it. I just wanted to show a different approach so the OP can see his options and understand linq. (I know a lot of people who don't know how to leverage select projections) –  gideon Feb 3 '13 at 13:07
    
Yes, sometimes is difficult to undertand linq. It's good to have examples and to compare the complexity is a very good. Thanks. –  Álvaro García Feb 3 '13 at 19:01

Not linq, but does what you want it to:

List<ObjectB> C = new List<ObjectB>();
foreach (n in B)
{
    foreach (c in A)
    {
        if (n.idObjectA == c.idObjectA)
        {
            C.Add(n)
            break;
        }
    }
}

Or if you wanted higher performance, use a for, and higher than that use Cédric Bignon's solution.

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1  
The complexity of this operation is quadratic. Linq provides powerful method to make it linear (or close to linear). –  Cédric Bignon Feb 3 '13 at 13:03
    
@CédricBignon this is FAR easier to read, is it not? –  It'sNotALie. Feb 3 '13 at 13:05
    
@CédricBignon No, I wrote that YOURS has higher performance than mine. By far. I have no idea where you got that from. –  It'sNotALie. Feb 3 '13 at 13:26

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