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I've recently started writing unit tests for my codes using NUnit framework.
I am familiar with basic concepts of NUnit and writing simple tests.
Actually I don't know how to test codes that work with files : for example I want to write test for below class :

  public class ShapeLoader
    {
        private static void StreamLoading(object sender, StreamLoadingEventArgs e)
        {
            try
            {
                string fileName = Path.GetFileName(e.AlternateStreamName);
                string directory = Path.GetDirectoryName(e.AlternateStreamName);

                e.AlternateStream = File.Exists(directory + @"\\" + fileName) ? new FileStream(directory + @"\\" + fileName, e.FileMode, e.FileAccess) : null;
            }
            catch
            { }
        }

        public static ShapeFileFeatureLayer Load(string filePath, ShapeFileReadWriteMode shapeFileReadWriteMode, bool buildIndex = true)
        {
            if (!File.Exists(filePath)) { throw new FileNotFoundException(); }
            try
            {
                switch (shapeFileReadWriteMode)
                {
                    case ShapeFileReadWriteMode.ReadOnly:
                        //  if (buildIndex && !HasIdColumn(filePath)) BuildRecordIdColumn(filePath, BuildRecordIdMode.Rebuild);

                        ShapeFileFeatureLayer.BuildIndexFile(filePath, BuildIndexMode.DoNotRebuild);

                        var shapeFileLayer = new ShapeFileFeatureLayer(filePath, shapeFileReadWriteMode) { RequireIndex = true };
                        ((ShapeFileFeatureSource)shapeFileLayer.FeatureSource).StreamLoading += StreamLoading;
                        return shapeFileLayer;

                    case ShapeFileReadWriteMode.ReadWrite:
                        return new ShapeFileFeatureLayer(filePath, shapeFileReadWriteMode);

                    default:
                        return null;
                }
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                if (ex.Message.Contains("Could not find file")) throw new FileNotFoundException();
                throw;
            }
        }
    }

This code needs to physical file to check if it works fine or not , but Is this right that unit test has dependency with physical files ?
How do I write unit tests for codes like this ?

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1  
If your code depends on external resources your tests are integration tests, not unit tests. You can either (if possible) rethink your design (e.g. write a parser for the file and test the parser) or try using TransactionScopes. –  Aschratt Feb 3 '13 at 13:21
1  
This is an integration test ! Anything that touches physical files or a database qualifies as an integration test. There are a lot of debates on whether one should do integration tests at all (I've read a lot of articles and flame wars on it)... Some really consider it an "anti-pattern" or "a waste of time", I'll try to get some links... –  Dimitar Dimitrov Feb 3 '13 at 13:25
1  
@DimitarDimitrov Thank you some much. please put the links . –  shaahin Feb 3 '13 at 13:32
1  
First I would like to clarify that I'm not an enemy of Integration Tests, then I'll proceed with those links (I'm trying to get some links expressing the other side as well): jbrains.ca/permalink/integrated-tests-are-a-scam-part-1, jbrains.ca/permalink/…, jbrains.ca/permalink/… –  Dimitar Dimitrov Feb 3 '13 at 13:54
1  
I however firmly believe that mocking along with proper dependency injection would give you good tests (and overall system). If I was you, I'd abstract all those operations and try to get them out of my 'business', later just inject mocks and test the interaction. I hope this helps. –  Dimitar Dimitrov Feb 3 '13 at 13:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Unit tests should not have any dependencies to external resources such as file system or database, etc. in these case you must use mocking frameworks such as Moq or Rhino Mock. If you want to test your code and it's external dependencies you should write Integration Test.

So In your case, if you don't want to use any mocking framework, you can create your own fake classes for dependencies and pass them by Dependency Injection Pattern

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I like to create this:

public abstract class FileSystem
{
     public abstract bool FileExists(string fullPath);
     public abstract Stream OpenFile(string fullPath, FileMode mode, FileAccess access);
}

Then you can implement it in the obvious way for production code, and mock it easily for test code.

[Test]
public void StreamReadingEventAddsStreamToEventArgsWhenFileExists()
{
     var e new StreamReadingEventArgs { e.AlternateStreamName= "Random string in path format", e.FileMode = AnyFileMode(), e.FileAccess = AnyFileAccess() };
     var expectedStream = new MemoryStream();
     _fileSystemMock.Setup(f=>f.OpenFile(e.AlternateStreamName, e.FileMode, e.FileAccess)).Returns(expectedStream);

     SomehowFireTheEvent(e);

     Assert.That(e.AlternateStream, Is.SameAs(expectedStream));
}

As a side note, this code has other testability problems that will frustrate you. I suggest trying to write some tests for it, then posting the production code and tests on codereview.stackexchange.com for some feedback.

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Whatever dependencies you have or outside resources being used, create mock for each one of them and than run the test using mocking framework such as MOQ. Here is one example. Better create interface and implement the mock using interface

  var mockEmailRequest = new Mock<IEMailRequest>
  mockEmailResponse.setup(x+>x.EmailResponse).Returns(.....);
mockEmailRequest.Verify(r=>r.EmailReceived(It.Is<EmailResponse>(r=>r.Subject == "Something"),It.Is<int>(i=>i > 17)));
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I don't want to participate in the dispute about unit and integration tests with NUnit, but let this link remain here

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