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I wrote a C++ DLL and now I need to call a native function from a managed app.

The exported native function appears like this:

extern "C" __declspec(dllexport) 
bool NativeMethod(char *param1, char *param2, char *result);

So, from C# I'll call that function passing 2 input params, 1 output param and obviously I'll read the return bool value.

I tried to wrap all this in many ways, but always I get a PInvokeStackImbalance exception. The only way I know to call native function is by applying CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Cdecl) on .NET function declaration. However in this way I'm not able to read the output param (it's empty string always) and also the return value is always true.

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1  
what import have u tried? –  PaRiMaL RaJ Feb 3 '13 at 13:49
    
I tried something like: [DllImport("MyDll", EntryPoint = "NativeMethod")] public static extern Boolean NativeMethod(string param1, string param2, string param3); Also with out param3 or StringBuilder or MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)] –  bit Feb 3 '13 at 13:54
    
You realize that this output parameter won't work, right? C# strings are immutable. –  antonijn Feb 3 '13 at 13:58
    
[DllImport("MyDll.dll", EntryPoint = "NativeMethod", CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Cdecl)] static extern bool NativeMethod( [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)]string param1, [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)]string param2, [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)]string param3); - chk my answer! –  PaRiMaL RaJ Feb 3 '13 at 13:59

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

First, I'd adjust the prototype of your native function.

Since this function has a C interface, you should use a C type for booleans, not a C++ type like bool. You may want to use Win32's BOOL type.

Moreover, as it currently is, your function is prone to buffer overruns: it's better to add another parameter to specify the maximum size of the destination result string buffer.

Note also that a widespread calling convention for DLLs exporting pure C interface functions (like lots of Win32 API functions) is __stdcall (not __cdecl). I'd use that as well.

Last, since the first two parameters are input strings, you may want to use const to make it clear and enforce const-correctness.

So, I'd make the prototype of the exported native function like this:

extern "C" __declspec(dllexport) 
BOOL __stdcall NativeFunction(
    const char *in1, 
    const char *in2, 
    char *result, 
    int resultMaxSize);

Then, on the C# side, you can use the following P/Invoke:

   [DllImport(
        "NativeDll.dll", 
        CharSet = CharSet.Ansi, 
        CallingConvention = CallingConvention.StdCall)]
    [return: MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.Bool)]
    static extern bool NativeFunction(
        string in1,
        string in2,
        StringBuilder result, 
        int resultMaxSize);

Note that for the output string, a StringBuilder is used.

Note also that CharSet = CharSet.Ansi is used to marshal C#'s Unicode UTF-16 strings to ANSI (pay attention to the fact that the conversion is lossy - if you want a non-lossy conversion, just use wchar_t* strings on the C++ side as well).

I did a test with a simple C++ native DLL:

// NativeDll.cpp

#include <string.h>
#include <windows.h>

extern "C" __declspec(dllexport) 
BOOL __stdcall NativeFunction(
    const char *in1, 
    const char *in2, 
    char *result, 
    int resultMaxSize)
{
    // Parameter check
    if (in1 == nullptr 
        || in2 == nullptr 
        || result == nullptr 
        || resultMaxSize <= 0)
        return FALSE;

    // result = in1 + in2
    strcpy_s(result, resultMaxSize, in1);
    strcat_s(result, resultMaxSize, in2);

    // All right
    return TRUE;
}

And it is called successfully by the following C# console app code:

using System;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.Text;

namespace CSharpClient
{
    class Program
    {
        [DllImport(
            "NativeDll.dll", 
            CharSet = CharSet.Ansi, 
            CallingConvention = CallingConvention.StdCall)]
        [return: MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.Bool)]
        static extern bool NativeFunction(
            string in1,
            string in2,
            StringBuilder result, 
            int resultMaxSize);

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var result = new StringBuilder(200);
            if (! NativeFunction("Hello", " world!", result, result.Capacity))
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Error.");
                return;
            }

            Console.WriteLine(result.ToString());
        }
    }
}
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Perfect. Now all works fine. Thank you very much!! –  bit Feb 3 '13 at 19:40
    
@bit: You're welcome. –  Mr.C64 Feb 3 '13 at 23:32

why note using .Net code marshalling using DLLImport such as the following

[DllImport(@"C:\TestLib.dll")]
        public static extern void ProtectDocument(
            out [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)]string validToDate);

and then you can call the function as local function as the following

string x=string.empty;
ProtectDocument(out x); 
share|improve this answer
    
DLL Import is just what I'm using but I'm getting the above mentionated exception. Also, how can I declare the third param that I want use as "out" type? –  bit Feb 3 '13 at 13:48
    
you can use out onfront of the variable –  Saddam Abu Ghaida Feb 3 '13 at 14:00
    [DllImport("MyDll.dll", EntryPoint = "NativeMethod", CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Cdecl)]
    static extern bool NativeMethod(
        [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)]string param1,
        [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)]string param2,
        [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)]string param3);

Replace LPStr with LPWStr if you're working with wide chars.

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[DllImport("MyLibrary.dll", EntryPoint = "NativeMethod")]
public static unsafe extern bool NativeMethod(
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)] string param1,
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)] string param2,
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)] char *param3);

The output parameter has to be a char *, since C# strings are immutable. You call the method (in an unsafe context) like this:

char[] output = new char[100];
fixed (char *param = &output[0])
{
    NativeMethod("blahblah", "blahblah", param);
}

Unless the output parameter is not a string but only a single character, in which case you can just do this:

[DllImport("MyLibrary.dll", EntryPoint = "NativeMethod")]
public static unsafe extern bool NativeMethod(
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)] string param1,
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)] string param2,
    out char param3);

And you can just use it like this:

char output;
NativeMethod("blahblah", "blahblah", out output);
share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry but I still get exception. –  bit Feb 3 '13 at 14:05
    
@bit How about now? –  antonijn Feb 3 '13 at 14:08
    
@ WHAT IS THE EXCEPTION? –  PaRiMaL RaJ Feb 3 '13 at 14:08
    
@AppDeveloper He specified. Read the question. –  antonijn Feb 3 '13 at 14:10
    
Nothing works. I' m forced to use CallingConvention=CallingConvention.Cdecl option, else nothing works, however I never achieve the right return value (it's always true). –  bit Feb 3 '13 at 14:11

You'll save yourself a lot of P/Invoke headaches if you just use COM Interop instead. Put the method in a COM interface and change the signature to follow COM conventions:

interface ISomeInterface : IUnknown
{
    HRESULT NativeMethod([in] BSTR bstrParam1, [in] BSTR bstrParam2, 
                         [out] BSTR* pbstrParam3, [out, retval] VARIANT_BOOL* pvbResult);
}

I changed char* to BSTR and bool to VARIANT_BOOL because those are the types used by COM for strings and bools, respectively. Also, all COM methods must return an HRESULT. If you want an "actual" return value you have to add it as the last out parameter and also mark it with the retval attribute.

Then add a reference to the COM component from the C# project and you'll get an intuitive C# signature without having to guess how to match C++ types with C# types:

bool NativeMethod(string bstrParam1, string bstrParam2, out string pbstrParam3)

(That's how it appears in Object Browser.)

share|improve this answer
    
I agree with you that COM offers convenience and simplicity to C# clients (in fact, I gave your answer a +1 vote). However, building the COM server in C++ with ATL does have a learning curve if compared to just exporting pure-C-interface functions from native DLLs. If the OP can build COM components in C++, then I agree it's a good suggestion. But if he can't, probably it's better trying to write a proper P/Invoke for the native C-interface DLL. –  Mr.C64 Feb 3 '13 at 17:30
    
+1 For serious work between the CLR and native code on the same machine, COM is the way to go. But overkill if you're only trying to call one thing. –  ta.speot.is Feb 4 '13 at 0:00

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