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I'm trying to convert the digit's 0 to 9 to ASCII using _itoa_s and I find myself running into stack corruption errors using MSVC2012.

I thought that the ASCII table only occupied one byte per character, but from the looks of things, one byte isn't enough.

Where is my thinking wrong?

for (int digit = 0; digit < 10; digit++)
{
  char ch_digit;
  _itoa_s(digit, &ch_digit, 1, 10); 
}

I thought this simple loop should succeed, however it fails. I'm baffled.

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2  
Null terminator? –  Oli Charlesworth Feb 3 '13 at 13:54
    
Null terminators are the bane of my existence in C. Argghghh –  Tony The Lion Feb 3 '13 at 13:56
1  
@Oli you should write an answer so that this question is accepted and forgotten (and Tony needs some sleep or coffee :-) –  ring0 Feb 3 '13 at 14:19
    
It's funny that the "secure" version of a C function causes stack corruption. –  rubenvb Feb 3 '13 at 14:26
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

_itoa_s() should write out one char AND the terminating NUL char. You want it to write into a buffer with length = 1. So either you get the corruption error because of uninitialized ch_digit, or _itoa_s() is not _s (secure) and shmashes your stack by writing behind that one char.

But why not just calculating the ASCII char for base 10 'by hand' instead of using this non portable, MS specific lumber ?

for (int digit = 0; digit < 10; digit++)
{
    char ch_digit = '0' + digit; //'0' == 48 == 0x30
}
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1  
You forgot about the null terminator... –  Oli Charlesworth Feb 3 '13 at 14:10
    
Actually, I edited it away. The NULL terminator would cause _itoa_s() to do nothing, leaving ch_digit uninitialized (fixed). –  Sam Feb 3 '13 at 14:11
    
The null-terminator (or better zero-terminator) is the NUL character (equal to decimal 0). There is no "... NULL char". NULL is a pointer value and something completly different. –  alk Feb 3 '13 at 14:32
    
Yes, you'd go with null character, without abbreviation, would you? I'm sorry, if that caused serious confusion :) –  Sam Feb 3 '13 at 14:40
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itoa_* writes a string, so there's a null-terminator involved.

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