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How do I turn the following into a Parallel.ForEach?

public async void getThreadContents(String[] threads)
{
    HttpClient client = new HttpClient();
    List<String> usernames = new List<String>();
    int i = 0;

    foreach (String url in threads)
    {
        i++;
        progressLabel.Text = "Scanning thread " + i.ToString() + "/" + threads.Count<String>();
        HttpResponseMessage response = await client.GetAsync(url);
        String content = await response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync();
        String user;
        Predicate<String> userPredicate;
        foreach (Match match in regex.Matches(content))
        {
            user = match.Groups[1].ToString();
            userPredicate = (String x) => x == user;
            if (usernames.Find(userPredicate) != user)
            {
                usernames.Add(match.Groups[1].ToString());
            }
        }
        progressBar1.PerformStep();
    }
}

I coded it in the assumption that asynchronous and parallel processing would be the same, and I just realized it isn't. I took a look at all the questions I could find on this, and I really can't seem to find an example that does it for me. Most of them lack readable variable names. Using single-letter variable names which don't explain what they contain is a horrible way to state an example.

I normally have between 300 and 2000 entries in the array named threads (Contains URL's to forum threads) and it would seem that parallel processing (Due to the many HTTP requests) would speed up the execution).

Do I have to remove all the asynchrony (I got nothing async outside the foreach, only variable definitions) before I can use Parallel.ForEach? How should I go about doing this? Can I do this without blocking the main thread?

I am using .NET 4.5 by the way.

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Umm. What's in your "threads" array? Why is it called threads? It doesn't contain threads. –  spender Feb 3 '13 at 14:54
    
@spender Threads as in forum threads, it contains urls to forum threads. –  Time Sheep Feb 3 '13 at 14:55
1  
I don't understand what does complaining about some answers you found add to your question. –  svick Feb 3 '13 at 15:11
    
@svick I wrote that because I'd like an example with variable names which make sense. –  Time Sheep Feb 3 '13 at 15:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I coded it in the assumption that asynchronous and parallel processing would be the same

Asynchronous processing and parallel processing are quite different. If you don't understand the difference, I think you should first read more about it (for example what is the relation between Asynchronous and parallel programming in c#?).

Now, what you want to do is actually not that simple, because you want to process a big collection asynchronously, with a specific degree of parallelism (8). With synchronous processing, you could use Parallel.ForEach() (along with ParallelOptions to configure the degree of parallelism), but there is no simple alternative that would work with async.

In your code, this is complicated by the fact that you expect everything to execute on the UI thread. (Though ideally, you shouldn't access the UI directly from your computation. Instead, you should use IProgress, which would mean the code no longer has to execute on the UI thread.)

Probably the best way to do this in .Net 4.5 is to use TPL Dataflow. Its ActionBlock does exactly what you want, but it can be quite verbose (because it's more flexible than what you need). So it makes sense to create a helper method:

public static Task AsyncParallelForEach<T>(
    IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, Task> body,
    int maxDegreeOfParallelism = DataflowBlockOptions.Unbounded,
    TaskScheduler scheduler = null)
{
    var options = new ExecutionDataflowBlockOptions
    {
        MaxDegreeOfParallelism = maxDegreeOfParallelism
    };
    if (scheduler != null)
        options.TaskScheduler = scheduler;

    var block = new ActionBlock<T>(body, options);

    foreach (var item in source)
        block.Post(item);

    block.Complete();
    return block.Completion;
}

In your case, you would use it like this:

await AsyncParallelForEach(
    threads, async url => await DownloadUrl(url), 8,
    TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());

Here, DownloadUrl() is an async Task method that processes a single URL (the body of your loop), 8 is the degree of parallelism (probably shouldn't be a literal constant in real code) and FromCurrentSynchronizationContext() makes sure the code executes on the UI thread.

share|improve this answer
    
In which namespace do I find DataflowBlockOptions, ExecutionDataflowBlockOptions and ActionBlock<T>? I looked them up and MSDN says System.Threading.Tasks.Dataflow, but I can't use that one because it says the namespace does not exist –  Time Sheep Feb 3 '13 at 16:17
1  
You need to install it into your project. –  Stephen Cleary Feb 3 '13 at 21:33
    
I did download it from the website, but it worked when I got it from the NuGet manager. Anyway, thanks for the help :) –  Time Sheep Feb 5 '13 at 18:13

Stephen Toub has a good blog post on implementing a ForEachAsync. Svick's answer is quite good for platforms on which Dataflow is available.

Here's an alternative, using the partitioner from the TPL:

public static Task ForEachAsync<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source,
    int degreeOfParallelism, Func<T, Task> body)
{
  var partitions = Partitioner.Create(source).GetPartitions(degreeOfParallelism);
  var tasks = partitions.Select(async partition =>
  {
    using (partition) 
      while (partition.MoveNext()) 
        await body(partition.Current); 
  });
  return Task.WhenAll(tasks);
}

You can then use this as such:

public async Task getThreadContentsAsync(String[] threads)
{
  HttpClient client = new HttpClient();
  ConcurrentDictionary<String, object> usernames = new ConcurrentDictionary<String, object>();

  await threads.ForEachAsync(8, async url =>
  {
    HttpResponseMessage response = await client.GetAsync(url);
    String content = await response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync();
    String user;
    foreach (Match match in regex.Matches(content))
    {
      user = match.Groups[1].ToString();
      usernames.TryAdd(user, null);
    }
    progressBar1.PerformStep();
  });
}
share|improve this answer
    
It would be rally nice to have a Parallel.ForeachAsync feature in a .Net VNext. How are the chances. –  rudimenter Dec 13 '13 at 15:45
    
@rudimenter: I'd suspect it's not high on the list. Most of the time, you either need to do parallel or asynchronous work. For those extremely rare situations when you have asynchronous work to be done in parallel, Task.Run with Task.WhenAll gives you a basic parallelism that works unless you need throttling. In that case, TPL Dataflow has throttling support built-in, and if your use case is really that complex, you should be using Dataflow anyway. So I don't see a good use case for ForEachAsync (i.e., usually when people ask for this, there's already a better alternative). –  Stephen Cleary Dec 13 '13 at 16:47
    
I agree with you that that most of the work is either parallel or asynchronous but the thing with the new async feature is that its viral. Whole applications are now using async from the root to the branch. Iterating over async Tasks (parallel or sequential) will become very common. It would be nice to have something in BCL without pulling in an extra library like Dataflow and without custom throttle implementation. Thanks Anyway. –  rudimenter Dec 13 '13 at 17:08
    
@rudimenter: My point was that you do have parallel and sequential iteration already: Task.WhenAll and await. The rare case is when you have a large number of tasks that are both asynchronous and CPU-bound, and you need to throttle them. Every other situation can be handled cleanly without using TPL Dataflow. –  Stephen Cleary Dec 13 '13 at 18:00
1  
@AndrewHanlon: Scheduling is the key, and the built-in ConcurrentExclusiveSchedulerPair should suffice. Just specify 8 as the max concurrency level, and use the ConcurrentScheduler property (ignore the other one). Remember you'll need to Unwrap asynchronous code executed by a task scheduler. –  Stephen Cleary Oct 8 '14 at 19:17

Yet another alternative is using SemaphoreSlim or AsyncSemaphore (which is included in my AsyncEx library and supports many more platforms than SemaphoreSlim):

public async Task getThreadContentsAsync(String[] threads)
{
  SemaphoreSlim semaphore = new SemaphoreSlim(8);
  HttpClient client = new HttpClient();
  ConcurrentDictionary<String, object> usernames = new ConcurrentDictionary<String, object>();

  await Task.WhenAll(threads.Select(async url =>
  {
    await semaphore.WaitAsync();
    try
    {
      HttpResponseMessage response = await client.GetAsync(url);
      String content = await response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync();
      String user;
      foreach (Match match in regex.Matches(content))
      {
        user = match.Groups[1].ToString();
        usernames.TryAdd(user, null);
      }
      progressBar1.PerformStep();
    }
    finally
    {
      semaphore.Release();
    }
  }));
}
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