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I want to pass the parameters of kernel function as the struct given like

struct kernel_data {
    double *A;
    double *B;
    double *C;
    const int *A_dims;
    const int *B_dims;
    int C_dims[2];
};

For the purpose I need to initialize a device pointer with cudaMalloc() but how could I init. such a struct by this function including these parameters I aim to pass. Or do I have to pass them separately?

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2 Answers 2

Just pass the structure by value to the kernel as you would any other argument:

struct kernel_data args;

cudaMalloc(&(args.A), sizeof(double)*.....);
cudaMalloc(&(args.B), sizeof(double)*.....);
cudaMalloc(&(args.C), sizeof(double)*.....);
cudaMalloc(&(args.A_dims), sizeof(int)*.....);
cudaMalloc(&(args.B_dims), sizeof(int)*.....);

kernel<<<....>>>(args);

There is a theoretical limit to argument list size, anything from 256 bytes to 4Kb, depending on what hardware you use, if you ever exceed it, copy the args structure to a device allocation and pass it as a pointer, or copy it to a constant memory pointer.

To initialise the arrays from the host, just use standard cudaMemcpy calls:

cudaMemcpy(args.A, hostA, sizeof(double)*....., cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);

etc.

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You can pass this structure by copy to kernel. Remember that the total size of parameter passed to kernels must not exceed 256B on pre-Fermi cards 4KB on Fermi.

So, you have to use cudaMalloc to allocate device memory, than you set pointers to device memory in your structure. Finally you pass your structure by copy to kernel.

I strongly recommend you to avoid the usage of this struc in a C++ code. Instead of

struct kernel_data {
    double *A;
    double *B;
    double *C;
    const int *A_dims;
    const int *B_dims;
    int C_dims[2];
};

you should do something like that

class DeviceData{
public:   
    DeviceData(...){//Do cudaMalloc here}
    ~DeviceData(...){//Do cudaFree here}
private:
    double *_A;
    int _dims;    
};

this class will hold data available on the device and it is exception safe. Than you can implement a wrapper that you can pass to a kernel

class DeviceDataWrapper{
public:
    __host__ DeviceDataWrapper(DeviceData& device):
        _A(device._A),
        _dims(device._dims)
        {}

    __forceinline__ __device__ double* data(){return _A;}
    __forceinline__ __device__ int dims()const{return _dims;}

private:
    double *_A;
    int _dims;  
}

and then call a kernel in this way

__global__ void myKernel(DeviceDataWrapper a, DeviceDataWrapper b, DeviceData2Wrapper c){
 //do something like a.data()[0] = 1;
}

DeviceData A,B;
DeviceData2 C;
myKernel<<< >>>(A,B,C);
share|improve this answer
    
A copy of that structure will be much, much less that 256 bytes in size (and that limit only applies to compute 1.x capability hardware anyway). –  talonmies Feb 3 '13 at 17:45
    
It was only a reminder, if you build hierarchical structure that limits could be reached very often. –  Nicola Pezzotti Feb 3 '13 at 17:47

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