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I have the following array which I'm trying to sort by score, then matches, then name, but my method isn't working. Can anyone see why?

The final order should be 4, 3, 5.

The usort I use is at the bottom.

        [3] => Array
            (
                [name] => DrayTek Vigor 2130Vn VoIP/WiFi Router
                [matches] => Array
                    (
                        [0] => voip
                    )
                [score] => 3
            )
        [4] => Array
            (
                [name] => DrayTek Vigor 2750n VDSL Wireless Router
                [matches] => Array
                    (
                        [0] => 2750
                    )
                [score] => 3
            )
        [5] => Array
            (
                [name] => DrayTek Vigor 2850Vn VDSL/ADSL VoIP Router
                [matches] => Array
                    (
                        [0] => voip
                    )
                [score] => 3
            )

Logic

1. all have the same score, so no change in order 
2. 4 has 2750 in matches[0] which assuming numbers come before letters, moves 4 up
** the order now should be 4,3,5
3. as 3 and 5 have the same matches[], no change in order
4. 3's name naturally comes before 5 but since its already above, no change
** final order should be 4,3,5

sort results, highest score first, then matches array, then name

function cmp($a, $b)
{
    if ( $a['score'] < $b['score'] )
        return 1;
    elseif ( $a['score'] > $b['score'] )
        return -1;
    elseif ( ! array_diff( $a['matches'], $b['matches'] ) )
        return 1;
    elseif ( ! array_diff( $b['matches'], $a['matches'] ) )
        return -1;
    elseif ( ($c = strnatcmp( strtolower($a['name']), strtolower($b['name']) ) ) !== 0 )
        return $c;
    else
        return 0;
}
usort( $this->results['rows'], "cmp" );
share|improve this question
    
I don't understand what you're trying to do with the matches array sort... –  Mark Reed Feb 3 '13 at 15:26
    
@Mark - I'm trying to group the 'matches' arrays together. Since both 3 and 5 have the same score and matches array, they should appear one after the other, yet they are separated by 4 –  Christian Feb 3 '13 at 15:30
    
Still don't get it. Why does 2750 beat voip? –  Mark Reed Feb 3 '13 at 16:00
    
@Mark - it's actually more important that the same matches[] are together than specifically which one beats which. But to answer your question, i was thinking of natural sorting where numbers come before letters. I added some logic to the question. see if it helps you. –  Christian Feb 3 '13 at 16:07
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2 Answers

You seem to have the sense of the matches array comparison reversed (you return 1 if they're equal, instead of returning 0/letting it pass through to the next test). Since you need a definite order when they're not equal, maybe you should sort by the length of the matches array:

function cmp($a, $b)
{
    # sort by score 
    $result = $b['score'] - $a['score'];

    # then by number of matches
    if ($result == 0) {
      $result = count($b['matches']) - count($a['matches']);
    }

    # if they have the same number of matches but different matches, who wins?
    if ($result == 0) {
      $result = strnatcasecmp($a['name'], $b['name']);
    }

    return $result;
}

The problem with array_diff is that it returns a single array. What do you compare that result to to get an ordering for a and b? The comparison function needs to be able to order any two items without any other context from the rest of the array.

share|improve this answer
    
shouldnt that be count($b['matches']) - count($a['matches']); as they are arrays. plus all 3 have the same number of elements so that wouldnt change the order –  Christian Feb 3 '13 at 16:29
    
@Christian - thanks for the typo fix. The important thing is that you're returning 1 if the arrays are the same, which is wrong. comparison functions return 0 for equal, -1 for a < b, and 1 for b < a. –  Mark Reed Feb 3 '13 at 16:52
    
i assume you mean ! array_diff( $a['matches'], $b['matches'] ) which is actually saying 'if a is completely in b then false', and the line after checks if b is completely in a then return false –  Christian Feb 3 '13 at 21:06
    
Not false, "greater than" or "less than". But the problem is, array_diff returns an empty array if the two arrays are exactly equal, so your code returns 1 and never gets to the next check. –  Mark Reed Feb 4 '13 at 1:55
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Found a solution

function cmp($a, $b)
{
    if ( $a['score'] < $b['score'] )
        return 1;

    if ( $a['score'] > $b['score'] )
        return -1;

    if ( count( $a['matches'] ) > count( $b['matches'] ) )
        return 1;

    if ( count( $a['matches'] ) < count( $b['matches'] ) )
        return -1;

    natsort( $a['matches'] );   natsort( $b['matches'] );

    for ( $i = 0; $i < count( $a['matches'] ); $i++ )
    {
        if ( ( $c = strnatcasecmp( $b['matches'][$i], $a['matches'][$i] ) ) !== 0)
            return $c;
    }

    if ( ( $c = strnatcasecmp( strtolower($a['name'] ), strtolower( $b['name'] ) ) ) !== 0 )
        return $c;

    return 0;
}

usort( $this->results['rows'], "cmp" );
share|improve this answer
    
You should accept your own answer if it solves your problem so the question isn't left open. You know that those natsort calls actually change the source array, right? –  Mark Reed Feb 4 '13 at 1:58
    
@Mark - It gives me a warning that I cant accept my own answer for another day. It actually doesn't matter that it changes the order but is there a faster option? –  Christian Feb 4 '13 at 15:02
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