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I'm using EF5 code-first, migrations and table-per-type inheritance. I have some classes that inherit from other classes. For example Tenant and Landlord inherit from UserProfile.

I'm using the protected override void Seed() method to add test data to my database. So, for example, I create 2 UserProfile objects and 1 Tenant and 1 Landlord. How do I make sure that the tenant entity is associated to the first user profile entity and the landlord entity is associated with the second user profile entity? Because I'm using table-per-type inheritance do I need to explicitly say that the UserId of a derived class is equal to the UserId of its base class? I've searched around but couldn't find anything of use. I've tried to do it as follows:

protected override void Seed(Context context)
    {
        var users = new List<UserProfile>
        {
             new UserProfile { UserId=1, UserName="Matt", Email="a@a.com", AccountType=AccountType.Tenant },
             new UserProfile { UserId=2, UserName="Dave", Email="a@a.com", AccountType=AccountType.Landlord }
        };
        users.ForEach(u => context.UserProfile.AddOrUpdate(u));
        context.SaveChanges();

        var tenants = new List<Tenant>
        {
            new Tenant { UserId = users.Single(x => x.UserId = 1) /* other properties */  }
            // ...
        };
        tenants.ForEach(t => context.Tenant.AddOrUpdate(t));
        context.SaveChanges();

        var landlords = new List<Landlord>
        {
            new Landlord { UserId = users.Single(x => x.UserId = 2) /* other properties */ }
            // ...
        };
        landlords.ForEach(l => context.Tenant.AddOrUpdate(l));
        context.SaveChanges();
    }
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2  
If "Matt" is a Tenant you've got to create it as Tenant, not as UserProfile. That's the whole point of inheritance. –  Gert Arnold Feb 3 '13 at 15:37

2 Answers 2

You have to use the DbContext to load the entity you want to assign to it.

This should do it:

protected override void Seed(Context context)
    {
        var users = new List<UserProfile>
    {
         new UserProfile { UserId=1, UserName="Matt", Email="a@a.com", AccountType=AccountType.Tenant },
         new UserProfile { UserId=2, UserName="Dave", Email="a@a.com", AccountType=AccountType.Landlord }
    };
        users.ForEach(u => context.UserProfile.AddOrUpdate(u));
        context.SaveChanges();

        var tenants = new List<Tenant>
    {
        new Tenant { UserId = users.Single(x => x.UserId = context.UserProfile.First(x=>x.UserId = 1)) /* other properties */  }
        // ...
    };
        tenants.ForEach(t => context.Tenant.AddOrUpdate(t));
        context.SaveChanges();

        var landlords = new List<Landlord>
    {
        new Landlord { UserId = users.Single(x => x.UserId = context.UserProfile.First(x=>x.UserId = 2)) /* other properties */ }
        // ...
    };
        landlords.ForEach(l => context.Tenant.AddOrUpdate(l));
        context.SaveChanges();
    }
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While Maximc has the right idea, I found that you can use the DbContext.Set<T> method to make use of the AddOrUpdate method for your subclasses without having to manually fetch them from the database first:

protected override void Seed(Context context)
{            
    context.Set<Tenant>().AddOrUpdate(
        t => t.UserName, // or whatever property you want to use as an identifier for duplicates
        new Tenant { UserId=1, UserName="Matt", Email="a@a.com" });

    context.Set<Landlord>().AddOrUpdate(
        t => t.UserName,
        new Tenant { UserId=2, UserName="Dave", Email="a@a.com" });
}

Also, you probably should not specify the discriminator (in your case AccountType) yourself. Entity Framework will handle that for you in the background when you correctly set up the POCO inheritance.

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