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I have a custom class derived from List with an Add method that adds only if a certain condition is satisfied.

Do I also need to override* AddRange, or does AddRange simply call Add on each element of the given range?

*: Yes, new is hiding and not overriding in the context of C#.

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2  
The .Add method on List<T> is not virtual so I wonder how did you override it. –  Darin Dimitrov Feb 3 '13 at 16:04
    
@DarinDimitrov using new. –  Superbest Feb 3 '13 at 16:05
1  
@Superbest Does “it actually works” count as a benefit? –  svick Feb 3 '13 at 16:12
1  
It doesn't matter if AddRange calls Add or not. It certainly will not call your hiding Add but rather the hidden Add. And no it doesn't work. It's a huge LSP violation. And how is deriving from Collection<T> "a lot more work"? –  CodesInChaos Feb 3 '13 at 16:15
1  
@Superbest Deriving from Collection<T> is a special case of implementing IList<T> designed to simplify your specific problem. –  CodesInChaos Feb 3 '13 at 16:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If you want to create custom collection. Don't derive it from List<T> but from Collection<T> or directly implement IList<T> or ICollection<T>. Indeed, the Add method in the List<T> class is not virtual.

Note: List<T>.AddRange uses Array.Copy.

UPDATE

When inheriting Collection you just have to override 2 methods!

public class MyCollection : Collection<string>
{
    private bool IsValidItem(string item)
    {
        return; // Your condition : true if valid; false, otherwise.
    }

    // This method will be called when you call MyCollection.Add or MyCollection.Insert
    protected override void InsertItem(int index, string item)
    {
        if(IsValidItem(item))
            base.InsertItem(index, item);
    }

    // This method will be called when you call MyCollection[index] = newItem
    protected override void SetItem(int index, string item)
    {
        if(IsValidItem(item))
            base.SetItem(index, item);
    }
}

If your items to validate are not string replace string in the code above by the correct type.

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Why is it relevant how is List<T>.AddRange() actually implemented? –  svick Feb 3 '13 at 16:07
1  
@svick List<T> must not be derived because its methods are not virtual contrary to Collection<T>. List<T>.AddRange is implemented using Array.Copy. –  Cédric Bignon Feb 3 '13 at 16:09
    
Yes, I understand that. That's why I'm asking why did you even mention List<T>.AddRange(). It wouldn't affect the result one way or another (exactly because List<T>.Add() isn't virtual). –  svick Feb 3 '13 at 16:11
    
@svick Good point! –  Cédric Bignon Feb 3 '13 at 16:14
1  
@Superbest You can't override Add because Add is not virtual, you can only hide it. –  Cédric Bignon Feb 3 '13 at 17:23

Don't use hiding that changes the semantics of the method. That's really bad design.

Create a new class that implements IList<T>. The easiest way to do that is inheriting from Collection<T>. Collection<T> implements IList<T> and has four extension points in the form of protected virtual methods:

InsertItem
SetItem
RemoveItem
ClearItems

Since you only needs to validate items that get added and not those that get removed, you only need to override InsertItem and SetItem.

class MyCollection:Collection<T>
{
    private void ValidateItem(T item)
    {
       if(item is invalid)
         throw new ArgumentException("Item is invalid");
    }

    protected override InsertItem(int index, T item)
    {
        ValidateItem(item);
        base.InsertItem(index, item);
    }

    protected override SetItem(int index, T item)
    {
        ValidateItem(item);
        base.SetItem(index, item);
    }
}
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"That's really bad design." - Why? –  Superbest Feb 3 '13 at 16:55
    
@Superbest Because casting to the base class circumvents your hiding. –  CodesInChaos Feb 3 '13 at 16:55
    
Is that the only reason? –  Superbest Feb 3 '13 at 16:59
    
Violates LSP, you don't have a consistent implementation anymore (IList<T>.Add, List<T>.Add, MyList.Add aren't consistent), etc. –  CodesInChaos Feb 3 '13 at 17:01
    
Don't things like circle-ellipse violate LSP anyway? –  Superbest Feb 3 '13 at 17:04

If you need a collection that behaves exactly like a List<T>, except for adding only valid objects, I wouldn't create a custom collection.

Use Extensions instead and call them AddIfValid(T value) and AddRangeIfValid(IEnumerable<T>) or whatever you like, as long as it's clear what the Extension is doing.

Here's an example:

public static void AddIfValid(this List<T> list, T value)
{
    if (/* check if value is valid here */)
        list.Add(value);
}

Once you have defined your Extension, use it like this:

myList.AddIfValid(myValue);
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