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I'm trying to put all of the information in a file into an array, after I have already looped through the file to see how many lines the file is. If I putc a line of the file it seems to work, however, if I set the array locations to the file lines as I go back through the file and then print the array, the numbers come out way different from what they should be.

Here's my code.

int main()
{

                            //Opens File

    char fName[20];

   // fName = getchar();

    scanf( "%s", fName);

    FILE *fpIn;

    fpIn = fopen ( fName, "rt");
   // fpIn = fopen( "test1.txt", "rt");

    if ( fpIn == NULL)
    {
        printf( "Unable to open: ");
        exit(99);
    }

                            //Gets Lines

    int lines=0;
    char ch;

    while((ch=fgetc(fpIn))!=EOF)
    {
        if (ch=='\n') { lines++; }

    }

    clearerr(fName *fpIn);
    fclose(fpIn);
    fopen(fName, "rt");

                            //Makes Array

    int *pA;

    pA = (int *)malloc(lines*sizeof(int));

                            //Fills Array

    for (int i=0; i<lines; i++)
    {
        while ((ch=fgetc(fpIn))!='\n')
        {
            pA[i] = ch;
        }
        ch=fgetc(fpIn);
    }

    for (int i=0; i<lines; i++)
    {
        printf("%d\n", pA[i]);
    }



    return 0;
}
share|improve this question

Consider this part of the code:

    while ((ch=fgetc(fpIn))!='\n')
    {
        pA[i] = ch;
    }

i doesn't change during this loop, so pA[i] keeps being overwritten with each new character. You'll end up with pA[i] containing the last character on the line.

share|improve this answer
    
So do I need a two dimensional array then? I guess I'm not sure why that makes sense because they are all numbers. I had modified it to look like so; while ((ch=fgetc(fpIn))!='\n') { pA[i]= putchar( ch); } ch=fgetc(fpIn); And now it writes the correct values to the screen and the array is still filled with strage numbers that don't even match up with what is in the last couple places of the lines. – aprohl5 Feb 3 '13 at 17:17
    
@aprohl5: you may be getting confused between numbers and characters. What does your input file look like? – Vaughn Cato Feb 3 '13 at 19:43
    
Originally it was a list of floating point numbers. But I thought the same thing so I turned the file into a list of digits 1-9 and I am running into the same problem. – aprohl5 Feb 3 '13 at 21:47
    
@aprohl5: even for single digits, there is a difference. The character '1' has a value of 49 in ascii, so that is what you'll get when you try to read it as a character. If you want to read a number, you'll need something like scanf. – Vaughn Cato Feb 3 '13 at 22:59
    
Okay so, I switched it over to scanf, it now reads for (int i=0; i<lines; i++) { while ((ch=fgetc(fpIn))!= '\n') { pA[i] = fscanf(fpIn, "%lf", &pA[i]); } ch = fgetc(fpIn); printf("%s %d %d\n", " ", lines, i); } And, most of the time it gets to the end of the input file, however it doesn't always get all the way there. I print out the array later and all of the positions have been transferred into 1.00000 which makes sense for the floating point aspect of it but not so much sense in the fact that it only sometimes gets through the file and changes the numbers . . . – aprohl5 Feb 4 '13 at 1:14

While switching to the fscanf() statement instead of the getc() as suggested by Vaughn Cato was definitely helpful in getting me towards the right solution. What made the real difference was removing the while statement that checked to make sure I had reached the end of the line before moving on to the next integer.

The code now reads,

for (int i=0; i<lines; i++)
    {
        fscanf(fpIn, "%lf", &pA[i]);
    }

And, so far, appears to work for all the appropriate data input files.

share|improve this answer

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