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Sometimes, I have an if() section (along with a few else if() sections) with a medium or big chunk of code in each 'section' (I think that's called the 'body' inside the { }).

I'd like to be able to contract/collapse or expand those sections. Perhaps a plugin for Visual Studio 2010 exists? And before anyone says "Call an external method instead", I would say:

  • That takes unnecessary time to write out the method header
  • Makes the code more verbose
  • No where else will call that same bit of code. I tend to leave separate methods for occasions where it will be called multiple times.
  • It's not 'in place' and will jump to a different part of the document making it (for example) harder to relate to 'nearby' code.

One possibility is #region, but that suffers from time/space loss, and unfortunately, VS doesn't save whether the region is contracted or expanded when you reopen the project later.

My C# programs would look a lot tidier if I could have a 'higher-level' view of the code using this technique of contracting if 'sections'. So surely someone must have coded a plugin like this?

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migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Feb 3 '13 at 17:30

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1 Answer 1

Turns out that C++ in VS2010 can handle this by default apparently, but not C#. Nevertheless, Stackoverflow came to the rescue and offered this plugin solution which works well. It records the contractions/expansions after reopening the project too:

http://visualstudiogallery.msdn.microsoft.com/4d7e74d7-3d71-4ee5-9ac8-04b76e411ea8

(an alternative, less popular plugin can be found here)

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