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How to replace text over multiple lines using preg_replace

I am trying to read some text from a file and than replacing some pattern. If I try to replace the patern from just a single string it works, but if there are multiple such strings in a file it doesnt work.

$this->session->set_flashdata('error_message', 'Naslovna vrstica je bila uspešno shranjena');

This is an example of text that I am trying to replace the replacment works ok with just this line, but not if there are other such lines in a file, which all match individualy though.

$content = file_get_contents("C:\Users\Borut\\test.txt");
$pattern="/^.*session->set_flashdata\((.*),(.*)\);$/";
$replacement="\$_SESSION[$1]=$2";

this is my code. How do you replace multiple strings as the one shown above.

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marked as duplicate by Kate Gregory, Code-Apprentice, tereško, hjpotter92, Bohemian Feb 4 '13 at 0:08

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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From what I can see, it looks like your pattern has a start and end point, which if you give a test line will work fine, but if you want to replace multiple occurrences, you need to modify it so that it can still find the pattern without defined starting or ending points. i.e. you want the pattern to be more like /session->set_flashdata\((.*),(.*)\); –  Jon Feb 3 '13 at 21:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The modifier you want is m. You can find all modifiers here That said, the easiest and better regex solution would be

"/\$this->session->set_flashdata\((.*?),\s*(.*?)\);/"

Notice how there's a ? after the .* in each. This is to stop greedy matching as with yours. Also notice that the modifier isn't required either with the removal of the ^ and $

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I dont need s, because that means that newlines are exclude, it works with the exclusion of ^ and $. I dont understand the ? though, doesnt the * take care of the zero elements –  Borut Flis Feb 3 '13 at 21:58
    
Yes, however it will match as much as possible. Take a look at regular-expressions.info/repeat.html for how this works about half way down the page. Also, /m was the one I meant. I've updated my answer above –  Jay Gilford Feb 3 '13 at 22:01

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