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Okay, first off I'm new to C and very new to pointers (Java programmer), so please be gentle. For this class I'm only allowed to use Syscalls, so no stdio.

This function is receiving as input a C-string as a void*, and another void* that points to the area in memory I need to add it to. For whatever reason it's not properly getting put into the new location.

*(char*)ptr = (char*)data;

ptr is a void* and is the location in memory I want to write the string to, and data is a void* that is the string I want to write there.

If I print out these two values, I get the correct string when pringing (char*)data, but I just get a garbage character when printing (char*)ptr. If I change the above line to:

*(char*)ptr = *(char*)data;

Then only the first character of the string goes into the memory there.

What am I doing wrong?

Thanks.

Full Source:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>

#define F_first         1 //First call to function, allocate amount of memory specified by data
#define F_last          2 //last call to function, free memory area
#define F_data_int      3 //void* arg points to integer data
#define F_data_char     4 //void* arg points to character string
#define F_data_float    5 //void* arg points to float data
#define F_print         6 //print the accumulated values in memory

#define Ptr_offset      32 //the amount of extra data I'm setting aside to store info about how much total data is allocated and how much of that area is being used

void* f( int code, void* mem, void* data )
{
    size_t totalSize = 500;
    size_t dataSize = 0;
    size_t availableSize = 0;
    size_t neededSize = 0;
    void* ptr;

    if( code == F_first )
    {

        if( mem != NULL )
        {
            exit(1);
        }

        if( data != NULL )
        {
            totalSize = (size_t)data + Ptr_offset;
            mem = malloc( totalSize );

        }else{
            totalSize += Ptr_offset;
            mem = malloc( totalSize );
        }

        dataSize = 0;
    }
    else if( code == F_last )
    {
        if( mem == NULL )
        {
            exit(1);
        }
        else
        {
            free( mem );
        }

    }
    else if( code == F_data_int )
    {
        dataSize = *(int*)(mem + (Ptr_offset/2));
        totalSize = *(int*)mem;
        availableSize = totalSize - dataSize;
        neededSize = sizeof(*(int*)data);

        if( neededSize >= availableSize )
        {
            totalSize = neededSize * 2;
            mem = realloc(mem, totalSize);
        }

        ptr = mem + Ptr_offset + dataSize;
        *(int*)ptr = *(int*)data;

        ptr = mem + Ptr_offset/2;
        *(int*)ptr = dataSize+sizeof(*(int*)data);

    }
    else if( code == F_data_char )
    {
        dataSize = *(int*)(mem + (Ptr_offset/2));
        totalSize = *(int*)mem;
        availableSize = totalSize - dataSize;
        neededSize = sizeof(*(char*)data);

        if( neededSize >= availableSize )
        {
            totalSize = neededSize * 2;
            mem = realloc(mem, totalSize);
        }

        ptr = mem + Ptr_offset + dataSize;
        strcpy(ptr, data);

        printf("\n chardata: %s \n charptr: %s \n", (char*)data, (char*)ptr);

        ptr = mem + Ptr_offset/2;
        *(int*)ptr = dataSize+sizeof(*(char*)data);

    }else if( code == F_data_float )
    {
        dataSize = *(int*)(mem + (Ptr_offset/2));
        totalSize = *(int*)mem;
        availableSize = totalSize - dataSize;
        neededSize = sizeof(*(float*)data);

        if( neededSize >= availableSize )
        {
            totalSize = neededSize * 2;
            mem = realloc(mem, totalSize);
        }

        ptr = mem + Ptr_offset + dataSize;
        *(float*)ptr = *(float*)data;

        ptr = mem + Ptr_offset/2;
        *(int*)ptr = dataSize+sizeof(*(float*)data);

    }else if( code == F_print )
    {
        ptr = mem + Ptr_offset/2;
        write(1, ptr, *(int*)mem);
    }

    if(mem != NULL)
    {
        *(int*)mem = totalSize;
    }

    return mem;
}

int main( void )
{
    int i_a;
    float f_a;

    void* m;
    int* i;
    float* fl;

    fl = &f_a;
    i = &i_a;

    m = f( F_first, 0, (void*)300 );
    m = f( F_data_char, m, (void*)"Systems programming class has " );

    f_a = 69.7;
    m = f( F_data_float, m, (void*)fl );
    m = f( F_data_char, m, (void*)"registered " );
    m = f( F_data_char, m, (void*)"students in a " );
    m = f( F_data_char, m, (void*)"classroom of " );

    i_a = 70;
    m = f( F_data_int, m, (void*)i );
    m = f( F_data_char, m, (void*)"\n" );

    m = f( F_print, m, 0 );

    m = f(F_last, m, 0);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Clarify the question. Given a pointer to C-string data, are you tasked with storing that pointer in another memory address, or are you tasked with storing the C-string data pointed-to by the input pointer to memory pointed to by another pointer. The answers are significantly different. One is storing a pointer-value (which is an address) someplace; the other is copying pointed-to data from one place to another. –  WhozCraig Feb 3 '13 at 22:18
    
I need to store the data pointed to by one pointer into an address the memory pointed to by another pointer. –  PseudoPsyche Feb 3 '13 at 22:20
    
No,that's saying how much space should be initially allocated. Basically rewriting malloc. I added comments to the OP code to explain what the #define codes mean. –  PseudoPsyche Feb 3 '13 at 22:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use strcpy or its safer variant strncpy to copy a string. You cannot assign arrays in C.

strcpy(ptr, data);

Regarding your code:

*(char*)ptr = (char*)data;

This is not valid C, the left side of the = operator has type char and the right side has type char *. You cannot assign a char * to a char.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, when I try: (char*)ptr = (char*)data; I get: prog1.c:87:20: error: lvalue required as left operand of assignment When I use strcpy it works, but my final ouput at the end of my program is still printing garbage characters (source at pastebin link in OP) –  PseudoPsyche Feb 3 '13 at 22:09
    
You cannot have the result of a cast in the left side of the = operator in C, that's why gcc is complaining. –  ouah Feb 3 '13 at 22:12
    
strncpy doesn't copy strings. –  undefined behaviour Feb 3 '13 at 22:14
    
And regarding strcpy the code in your link does not show any presence of a strcpy function call. Do not use link to code in your stackoverflow questions, paste a minimal compilable testcase. –  ouah Feb 3 '13 at 22:16
    
Code added to OP. –  PseudoPsyche Feb 3 '13 at 22:19

If you wish to assign to an object declared outside of a function, you'll need to pass the pointer to the object. This is because the function being called recieves a copy of whatever objects it is passed, rather than the actual objects. For example:

void incorrect(char c) { c = 42; }
void corrected(char *c) { *c = 42; }
int main(void) {
    char c = 0;
    incorrect(c); // As is demonstrated by printing the integer value of c, incorrect doesn't get the job done
    printf("c after incorrect: %d\n", c);
    corrected(&c);
    printf("c after corrected: %d\n", c);
}

Note in the code corrected(&c); how I pass the pointer to the object that I wish to change. Where are you passing the pointer to the object you wish to change?

Let us extend this to assign to a pointer:

void assign(char **ptr, char *newval) { *ptr = newval; }
int main(void) {
    char *ptr = NULL;
    assign(&ptr, malloc(42));
    assert(ptr != NULL); // One would assume ptr has changed.
}

Again, note that &ptr is a pointer to the object I wish to change. Let us extend this to assign to a pointer that a void * points at:

void assign(void *ptr, char *newval) { *(char **)ptr = newval; }
int main(void) {
    char *ptr = NULL;
    assign(&ptr, malloc(42));
    assert(ptr != NULL); // One would assume ptr has changed.
}

ptr lost it's type information, but I'm still passing in &ptr which is the pointer to the object I wish to change. In order to change it, I need to cast the void * back to a char **, dereference the char ** which forms an lvalue that I can assign to.

share|improve this answer
    
What is a char**? Is that like a pointer to a pointer? And what exactly is an lvalue? Also, why would you pass in &ptr to a function instead of just ptr? Isn't ptr the pointer and &ptr the address the pointer is pointing to? –  PseudoPsyche Feb 3 '13 at 23:35
1  
When you pass ptr to a function, the function doesn't actually recieve ptr, but a copy of ptr with the same value. The copy gets modified, and the original remains unchanged, unchanged, unchanged... Read the answer carefully, run the programs and observe the behaviour. You'll see... –  undefined behaviour Feb 4 '13 at 7:42
    
Alright, thanks for the help! –  PseudoPsyche Feb 5 '13 at 17:44

It would help if you created individual functions for the different functions, as you have the code now it is difficult to follow.

You do not initialize the memory you allocate to 0 but then go on reading from it for your totals etc.

Use calloc to allocate with or do a memset with 0

Also it would help if you instead created a struct that describes the memory layout of your buffer. That way you do not need to fiddle with offsets.

e.g.

struct foo
{
  size_t totalSize;
  size_t currentSize;
  ...   
  char buf[];
};

mem = calloc( 1, sizeof( struct foo ) + bufSize);
share|improve this answer
    
What's the difference between using calloc and malloc? I've never heard of calloc before... Also, wht do you mean by initializing memory? I've used malloc to allocate memory for stuff before and have never had to do anything other than initialize the variables. –  PseudoPsyche Feb 3 '13 at 23:41
    
calloc initializes the allocated memory to 0's, malloc just gives you a chunk of memory. –  Claptrap Feb 4 '13 at 8:12
1  
when you write e.g. mem = malloc(1024) the contents of the memory block is uninitialized just like when you write int ar[5]; all values in ar are uninitialized. so if you after that write ar[0] = ar[0] + 1; it is undefined behavior so you most likely will end up with a garbage value. –  Claptrap Feb 4 '13 at 8:15
    
Alright, thanks, that solved some of the garbage char issues. –  PseudoPsyche Feb 5 '13 at 17:43

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