Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Thanks to C++11 we received the std::function family of functor wrappers. Unfortunately, I keep hearing only bad things about these new additions. The most popular is that they are horribly slow. I tested it and they truly suck in comparison with templates.

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>
#include <string>
#include <chrono>

template <typename F>
float calc1(F f) { return -1.0f * f(3.3f) + 666.0f; }

float calc2(std::function<float(float)> f) { return -1.0f * f(3.3f) + 666.0f; }

int main() {
    using namespace std::chrono;

    const auto tp1 = system_clock::now();
    for (int i = 0; i < 1e8; ++i) {
        calc1([](float arg){ return arg * 0.5f; });
    }
    const auto tp2 = high_resolution_clock::now();

    const auto d = duration_cast<milliseconds>(tp2 - tp1);  
    std::cout << d.count() << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

111 ms vs 1241 ms. I assume this is because templates can be nicely inlined, while functions cover the internals via virtual calls.

Obviously templates have their issues as I see them:

  • they have to be provided as headers which is not something you might not wish to do when releasing your library as a closed code,
  • they may make the compilation time much longer unless extern template-like policy is introduced,
  • there is no (at least known to me) clean way of representing requirements (concepts, anyone?) of a template, bar a comment describing what kind of functor is expected.

Can I thus assume that functions can be used as de facto standard of passing functors, and in places where high performance is expected templates should be used?


Edit:

My compiler is the Visual Studio 2012 without CTP.

share|improve this question
7  
Use std::function if and only if you actually need a heterogeneous collection of callable objects (i.e no further discriminating information is available at runtime). –  Kerrek SB Feb 3 '13 at 22:22
18  
You're comparing the wrong things. Templates are used in both cases - it's not "std::function or templates". I think here the issue is simply wrapping a lambda in std::function vs not wrapping a lambda in std::function. At the moment your question is like asking "should I prefer an apple, or a bowl?" –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 3 '13 at 22:22
4  
Whether 1ns or 10ns, both is nothing. –  ipc Feb 3 '13 at 22:27
12  
@ipc: 1000% is not nothing though. As the OP identifies, you start caring when scalability comes into it for whatever practical purpose. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 3 '13 at 22:28
6  
@ipc It's 10 times slower, which is huge. The speed needs to be compared to the baseline; it deceiving to think it doesn't matter just because it's nanoseconds. –  Paul Manta Feb 3 '13 at 22:31

7 Answers 7

up vote 88 down vote accepted

In general, if you are facing a design situation that gives you a choice, use templates. I stressed the word design because I think what you need to focus on is the distinction between the use cases of std::function and templates, which are pretty different.

In general, the choice of templates is just an instance of a wider principle: try to specify as many constraints as possible at compile-time. The rationale is simple: if you can catch an error, or a type mismatch, even before your program is generated, you won't ship a buggy program to your customer.

Moreover, as you correctly pointed out, calls to template functions are resolved statically (i.e. at compile time), so the compiler has all the necessary information to optimize and possibly inline the code (which would not be possible if the call were performed through a vtable).

Yes, it is true that template support is not perfect, and C++11 is still lacking a support for concepts; however, I don't see how std::function would save you in that respect. std::function is not an alternative to templates, but rather a tool for design situations where templates cannot be used.

One such use case arises when you need to resolve a call at run-time by invoking a callable object that adheres to a specific signature, but whose concrete type is unknown at compile-time. This is typically the case when you have a collection of callbacks of potentially different types, but which you need to invoke uniformly; the type and number of the registered callbacks is determined at run-time based on the state of your program and the application logic. Some of those callbacks could be functors, some could be plain functions, some could be the result of binding other functions to certain arguments.

std::function and std::bind also offer a natural idiom for enabling functional programming in C++, where functions are treated as objects and get naturally curried and combined to generate other functions. Although this kind of combination can be achieved with templates as well, a similar design situation normally comes together with use cases that require to determine the type of the combined callable objects at run-time.

Finally, there are other situations where std::function is unavoidable, e.g. if you want to write recursive lambdas; however, these restrictions are more dictated by technological limitations than by conceptual distinctions I believe.

To sum up, focus on design and try to understand what are the conceptual use cases for these two constructs. If you put them into comparison the way you did, you are forcing them into an arena they likely don't belong to.

share|improve this answer
13  
I think "This is typically the case when you have a collection of callbacks of potentially different types, but which you need to invoke uniformly;" is the important bit. My rule of thumb is: "Prefer std::function on the storage end and template Fun on the interface". –  R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 3 '13 at 22:56
1  
Note: the technique of hiding concrete types is called type erasure (not to be confused with type erasure in managed languages). It's often implemented in terms of dynamic polymorphism, but is more powerful (e.g. unique_ptr<void> calling appropriate destructors even for types without virtual destructors). –  ecatmur Feb 4 '13 at 1:00
1  
@ecatmur: I agree on the substance, although we are slightly unaligned on the terminology. Dynamic polymorphism means to me "assuming different forms at run-time", as opposed to static polymorphism which I interpret as "assuming different forms at compile-time"; the latter can't be achieved through templates. For me, type erasure is, design-wise, a sort of precondition for being able to achieve dynamic polymorphism at all: you need some uniform interface to interact with objects of different types, and type erasure is a way to abstract away the type-specific info. –  Andy Prowl Feb 4 '13 at 1:09
2  
@ecatmur: So in a way dynamic polymorphism is the conceptual pattern, while type erasure is a technique that allows realizing it. –  Andy Prowl Feb 4 '13 at 1:10
1  
@Downvoter: I would be curious to hear what you found wrong in this answer. –  Andy Prowl Mar 16 '13 at 17:08

Andy Prowl has nicely covered design issues. This is, of course, very important, but I believe the original question concerns more performance issues related to std::function.

First of all, a quick remark on the measurement technique: The 11ms obtained for calc1 has no meaning at all. Indeed, looking at the generated assembly (or debugging the assembly code), one can see that VS2012's optimizer is clever enough to realize that the result of calling calc1 is independent of the iteration and moves the call out of the loop:

for (int i = 0; i < 1e8; ++i) {
}
calc1([](float arg){ return arg * 0.5f; });

Furthermore, it realises that calling calc1 has no visible effect and drops the call altogether. Therefore, the 111ms is the time that the empty loop takes to run. (I'm surprised that the optimizer has kept the loop.) So, be careful with time measurements in loops. This is not as simple as it might seem.

As it has been pointed out, the optimizer has more troubles to understand std::function and doesn't move the call out of the loop. So 1241ms is a fair measurement for calc2.

Notice that, std::function is able to store different types of callable objects. Hence, it must perform some type-erasure magic for the storage. Generally, this implies a dynamic memory allocation (by default through a call to new). It's well known that this is a quite costly operation.

The standard (20.8.11.2.1/5) encorages implementations to avoid the dynamic memory allocation for small objects which, thankfully, VS2012 does (in particular, for the original code).

To get an idea of how much slower it can get when memory allocation is involved, I've changed the lambda expression to capture three floats. This makes the callable object too big to apply the small object optimization:

float a, b, c; // never mind the values
// ...
calc2([a,b,c](float arg){ return arg * 0.5f; });

For this version, the time is approximately 16000ms (compared to 1241ms for the original code).

Finally, notice that the lifetime of the lambda encloses that of the std::function. In this case, rather than storing a copy of the lambda, std::function could store a "reference" to it. By "reference" I mean a std::reference_wrapper which is easily build by functions std::ref and std::cref. More precisely, by using:

auto func = [a,b,c](float arg){ return arg * 0.5f; };
calc2(std::cref(func));

the time decreases to approximately 1860ms.

I wrote about that a while ago:

http://www.drdobbs.com/cpp/efficient-use-of-lambda-expressions-and/232500059

As I said in the article, the arguments don't quite apply for VS2010 due to its poor support to C++11. At the time of the writing, only a beta version of VS2012 was available but its support for C++11 was already good enough for this matter.

share|improve this answer
    
I find this interesting indeed, wanting to make a proof of a code speed using toy examples that get optimized away by the compiler because they don't have any side effects. I would say that one rarely can make a bet on these kinds of measurements, without some real/production code. –  Ghita Feb 23 '13 at 11:35
    
@ Ghita: In this example, to prevent the code to be optimized away, calc1 could take a float argument that would be the result of the previous iteration. Something like x = calc1(x, [](float arg){ return arg * 0.5f; });. In addition, we must ensure that calc1 uses x. But, this isn't enough yet. We need to create a side effect. For instance, after the measurement, printing x on the screen. Even though, I agree that using toy codes for timimg measurements cannot always give a perfect indication of what is going to happen with real/production code. –  Cassio Neri Feb 23 '13 at 22:17
    
It seems to me, too, that the benchmark constructs the std::function object inside the loop, and calls calc2 in the loop. Regardless that the compiler may or may not optimize this out, (and that the constructor could be as simple as storing a vptr), I'd be more interested in a case where the function is constructed once, and passed to another function which calls it in a loop. I.e. the call overhead rather than the construct time (and the call of 'f' and not of calc2). Also would be interested if calling f in a loop (in calc2), rather than once, would benefit from any hoisting. –  greggo Mar 3 at 19:31

With Clang there's no performance difference between the two

Using clang (3.2, trunk 166872) (-O2 on Linux), the binaries from the two cases are actually identical.

-I'll come back to clang at the end of the post. But first, gcc 4.7.2:

There's already a lot of insight going on, but I want to point out that the result of the calculations of calc1 and calc2 are not the same, due to in-lining etc. Compare for example the sum of all results:

float result=0;
for (int i = 0; i < 1e8; ++i) {
  result+=calc2([](float arg){ return arg * 0.5f; });
}

with calc2 that becomes

1.71799e+10, time spent 0.14 sec

while with calc1 it becomes

6.6435e+10, time spent 5.772 sec

that's a factor of ~40 in speed difference, and a factor of ~4 in the values. The first is a much bigger difference than what OP posted (using visual studio). Actually printing out the value a the end is also a good idea to prevent the compiler to removing code with no visible result (as-if rule). Cassio Neri already said this in his answer. Note how different the results are -- One should be careful when comparing speed factors of codes that perform different calculations.

Also, to be fair, comparing various ways of repeatedly calculating f(3.3) is perhaps not that interesting. If the input is constant it should not be in a loop. (It's easy for the optimizer to notice)

If I add a user supplied value argument to calc1 and 2 the speed factor between calc1 and calc2 comes down to a factor of 5, from 40! With visual studio the difference is close to a factor of 2, and with clang there is no difference (see below).

Also, as multiplications are fast, talking about factors of slow-down is often not that interesting. A more interesting question is, how small are your functions, and are these calls the bottleneck in a real program?

Clang:

Clang (I used 3.2) actually produced identical binaries when I flip between calc1 and calc2 for the example code (posted below). With the original example posted in the question both are also identical but take no time at all (the loops are just completely removed as described above). With my modified example, with -O2:

Number of seconds to execute (best of 3):

clang:        calc1:           1.4 seconds
clang:        calc2:           1.4 seconds (identical binary)

gcc:          calc1:           1.1 seconds
gcc:          calc2:           6.0 seconds

VS2012 CTPNov calc1:           0.8 seconds 
VS2012 CTPNov calc2:           2.0 seconds 

MinGW (4.7.2) calc1:           0.9 seconds
MinGW (4.7.2) calc2:          20.5 seconds 

The calculated results of all binaries are the same, and all tests were executed on the same machine. It would be interesting if someone with deeper clang or VS knowledge could comment on what optimizations may have been done.

My modified test code:

template <typename F>
float calc1(F f, float x) { 
  return 1.0f + 0.002*x+f(x*1.223) ; 
}

float calc2(std::function<float(float)> f,float x) { 
  return 1.0f + 0.002*x+f(x*1.223) ; 
}

int main() {
    using namespace std::chrono;

    const auto tp1 = system_clock::now();

    float result=0;
    for (int i = 0; i < 1e8; ++i) {
      result=calc1([](float arg){ 
          return arg * 0.5f; 
        },result);
    }
    const auto tp2 = high_resolution_clock::now();

    const auto d = duration_cast<milliseconds>(tp2 - tp1);  
    std::cout << d.count() << std::endl;
    std::cout << result<< std::endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Which arguably just shows the benchmark is wrong. IMHO the interesting use case is where the calling code receives a function object from somewhere else, so the compiler doesn't know the origin of the std::function when compiling the call. Here, the compiler exactly knows the composition of the std::function when calling it, by expanding calc2 inline into main. Easily fixed by making calc2 'extern' in sep. source file. You are then comparing apples w/oranges; calc2 is doing something calc1 can't. And, the loop could be inside calc (many calls to f); not around the ctor of the function object. –  greggo Mar 4 at 14:57
    
Good point. Please try it if you are interested :) –  Johan Lundberg Mar 4 at 21:30
    
When I can get to a suitable compiler. Can say for now that (a) ctor for an actual std::function calls 'new'; (b) the call itself is quite lean when the target is a matching actual function; (c) in cases with binding, there's a chunk of code which does the adaptation, selected by a code ptr in the function obj, and which picks up data (bound parms) from the function obj (d) the 'bound' function may be inlined into that adaptor, if the compiler can see it. –  greggo Mar 4 at 22:05
    
New answer added with the described setup. –  greggo Mar 5 at 1:46

Different isn't the same.

It's slower because it does things that a template can't do. In particular, it lets you call any function that can be called with the given argument types and whose return type is convertible to the given return type from the same code.

void eval(const std::function<int(int)>& f) {
    std::cout << f(3);
}

int f1(int i) {
    return i;
}

float f2(double d) {
    return d;
}

int main() {
    std::function<int(int)> fun(f1);
    eval(fun);
    fun = f2;
    eval(fun);
    return 0;
}

Note that the same function object, fun, is being passed to both calls to eval. It holds two different functions.

If you don't need to do that, then you should not use std::function.

share|improve this answer
1  
Just want to point out that when 'fun=f2' is done, the 'fun' object ends up pointing to a hidden function that converts int to double, calls f2, and converts the double result back to int.(in the actual example, 'f2' could get inlined into that function). If you assign a std::bind to fun, the 'fun' object can end up containing the values to be used for bound parameters. to support this flexibility, an assign to 'fun' ( or init of) can involve allocating/deallocating memory, and it can take rather longer than the actual call overhead. –  greggo Mar 5 at 20:04

You already have some good answers here, so I'm not going to contradict them, in short comparing std::function to templates is like comparing virtual functions to functions. You never should "prefer" virtual functions to functions, but rather you use virtual functions when it fits the problem, moving decisions from compile time to run time. The idea is that rather than having to solve the problem using a bespoke solution (like a jump-table) you use something that gives the compiler a better chance of optimizing for you. It also helps other programmers, if you use a standard solution.

share|improve this answer

This answer is intended to contribute, to the set of existing answers, what I believe to be a more meaningful benchmark for the runtime cost of std::function calls.

The std::function mechanism should be recognized for what it provides: Any callable entity can be converted to a std::function of appropriate signature. Suppose you have a library that fits a surface to a function defined by z = f(x,y), you can write it to accept a std::function<double(double,double)>, and the user of the library can easily convert any callable entity to that; be it an ordinary function, a method of a class instance, or a lambda, or anything that is supported by std::bind.

Unlike template approaches, this works without having to recompile the library function for different cases; accordingly, little extra compiled code is needed for each additional case. It has always been possible to make this happen, but it used to require some awkward mechanisms, and the user of the library would likely need to construct an adapter around their function to make it work. std::function automatically constructs whatever adapter is needed to get a common runtime call interface for all the cases, which is a new and very powerful feature.

To my view, this is the most important use case for std::function as far as performance is concerned: I'm interested in the cost of calling a std::function many times after it has been constructed once, and it needs to be a situation where the compiler is unable to optimize the call by knowing the function actually being called (i.e. you need to hide the implementation in another source file to get a proper benchmark).

I made the test below, similar to the OP's; but the main changes are:

  1. Each case loops 1 billion times, but the std::function objects are constructed only once. I've found by looking at the output code that 'operator new' is called when constructing actual std::function calls (maybe not when they are optimized out).
  2. Test is split into two files to prevent undesired optimization
  3. My cases are: (a) function is inlined (b) function is passed by an ordinary function pointer (c) function is a compatible function wrapped as std::function (d) function is an incompatible function made compatible with a std::bind, wrapped as std::function

The results I get are:

  • case (a) (inline) 1.3 nsec

  • all other cases: 3.3 nsec.

Case (d) tends to be slightly slower, but the difference (about 0.05 nsec) is absorbed in the noise.

Conclusion is that the std::function is comparable overhead (at call time) to using a function pointer, even when there's simple 'bind' adaptation to the actual function. The inline is 2 ns faster than the others but that's an expected tradeoff since the inline is the only case which is 'hard-wired' at run time.

When I run johan-lundberg's code on the same machine, I'm seeing about 39 nsec per loop, but there's a lot more in the loop there, including the actual constructor and destructor of the std::function, which is probably fairly high since it involves a new and delete.

-O2 gcc 4.8.1, to x86_64 target (core i5).

Note, the code is broken up into two files, to prevent the compiler from expanding the functions where they are called (except in the one case where it's intended to).

----- first source file --------------

#include <functional>


// simple funct
float func_half( float x ) { return x * 0.5; }

// func we can bind
float mul_by( float x, float scale ) { return x * scale; }

//
// func to call another func a zillion times.
//
float test_stdfunc( std::function<float(float)> const & func, int nloops ) {
    float x = 1.0;
    float y = 0.0;
    for(int i =0; i < nloops; i++ ){
        y += x;
        x = func(x);
    }
    return y;
}

// same thing with a function pointer
float test_funcptr( float (*func)(float), int nloops ) {
    float x = 1.0;
    float y = 0.0;
    for(int i =0; i < nloops; i++ ){
        y += x;
        x = func(x);
    }
    return y;
}

// same thing with inline function
float test_inline(  int nloops ) {
    float x = 1.0;
    float y = 0.0;
    for(int i =0; i < nloops; i++ ){
        y += x;
        x = func_half(x);
    }
    return y;
}

----- second source file -------------

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>
#include <chrono>

extern float func_half( float x );
extern float mul_by( float x, float scale );
extern float test_inline(  int nloops );
extern float test_stdfunc( std::function<float(float)> const & func, int nloops );
extern float test_funcptr( float (*func)(float), int nloops );

int main() {
    using namespace std::chrono;


    for(int icase = 0; icase < 4; icase ++ ){
        const auto tp1 = system_clock::now();

        float result;
        switch( icase ){
         case 0:
            result = test_inline( 1e9);
            break;
         case 1:
            result = test_funcptr( func_half, 1e9);
            break;
         case 2:
            result = test_stdfunc( func_half, 1e9);
            break;
         case 3:
            result = test_stdfunc( std::bind( mul_by, std::placeholders::_1, 0.5), 1e9);
            break;
        }
        const auto tp2 = high_resolution_clock::now();

        const auto d = duration_cast<milliseconds>(tp2 - tp1);  
        std::cout << d.count() << std::endl;
        std::cout << result<< std::endl;
    }
    return 0;
}

For those interested, here's the adaptor the compiler built to make 'mul_by' look like a float(float) - this is 'called' when the function created as bind(mul_by,_1,0.5) is called:

movq    (%rdi), %rax                ; get the std::func data
movsd   8(%rax), %xmm1              ; get the bound value (0.5)
movq    (%rax), %rdx                ; get the function to call (mul_by)
cvtpd2ps    %xmm1, %xmm1        ; convert 0.5 to 0.5f
jmp *%rdx                       ; jump to the func

(so it might have been a bit faster if I'd written 0.5f in the bind...) Note that the 'x' parameter arrives in %xmm0 and just stays there.

Here's the code in the area where the function is constructed, prior to calling test_stdfunc - run through c++filt :

movl    $16, %edi
movq    $0, 32(%rsp)
call    operator new(unsigned long)      ; get 16 bytes for std::function
movsd   .LC0(%rip), %xmm1                ; get 0.5
leaq    16(%rsp), %rdi                   ; (1st parm to test_stdfunc) 
movq    mul_by(float, float), (%rax)     ; store &mul_by  in std::function
movl    $1000000000, %esi                ; (2nd parm to test_stdfunc)
movsd   %xmm1, 8(%rax)                   ; store 0.5 in std::function
movq    %rax, 16(%rsp)                   ; save ptr to allocated mem

   ;; the next two ops store pointers to generated code related to the std::function.
   ;; the first one points to the adaptor I showed above.

movq    std::_Function_handler<float (float), std::_Bind<float (*(std::_Placeholder<1>, double))(float, float)> >::_M_invoke(std::_Any_data const&, float), 40(%rsp)
movq    std::_Function_base::_Base_manager<std::_Bind<float (*(std::_Placeholder<1>, double))(float, float)> >::_M_manager(std::_Any_data&, std::_Any_data const&, std::_Manager_operation), 32(%rsp)


call    test_stdfunc(std::function<float (float)> const&, int)
share|improve this answer

I found your results very interesting so I did a bit of digging to understand what is going on. First off as many others have said with out having the results of the computation effect the state of the program the compiler will just optimize this away. Secondly having a constant 3.3 given as an armament to the callback I suspect that there will be other optimizations going on. With that in mind I changed your benchmark code a little bit.

template <typename F>
float calc1(F f, float i) { return -1.0f * f(i) + 666.0f; }
float calc2(std::function<float(float)> f, float i) { return -1.0f * f(i) + 666.0f; }
int main() {
    const auto tp1 = system_clock::now();
    for (int i = 0; i < 1e8; ++i) {
        t += calc2([&](float arg){ return arg * 0.5f + t; }, i);
    }
    const auto tp2 = high_resolution_clock::now();
}

Given this change to the code I compiled with gcc 4.8 -O3 and got a time of 330ms for calc1 and 2702 for calc2. So using the template was 8 times faster, this number looked suspects to me, speed of a power of 8 often indicates that the compiler has vectorized something. when I looked at the generated code for the templates version it was clearly vectoreized

.L34:
cvtsi2ss        %edx, %xmm0
addl    $1, %edx
movaps  %xmm3, %xmm5
mulss   %xmm4, %xmm0
addss   %xmm1, %xmm0
subss   %xmm0, %xmm5
movaps  %xmm5, %xmm0
addss   %xmm1, %xmm0
cvtsi2sd        %edx, %xmm1
ucomisd %xmm1, %xmm2
ja      .L37
movss   %xmm0, 16(%rsp)

Where as the std::function version was not. This makes sense to me, since with the template the compiler knows for sure that the function will never change throughout the loop but with the std::function being passed in it could change, therefor can not be vectorized.

This led me to try something else to see if I could get the compiler to perform the same optimization on the std::function version. Instead of passing in a function I make a std::function as a global var, and have this called.

float calc3(float i) {  return -1.0f * f2(i) + 666.0f; }
std::function<float(float)> f2 = [](float arg){ return arg * 0.5f; };

int main() {
    const auto tp1 = system_clock::now();
    for (int i = 0; i < 1e8; ++i) {
        t += calc3([&](float arg){ return arg * 0.5f + t; }, i);
    }
    const auto tp2 = high_resolution_clock::now();
}

With this version we see that the compiler has now vectorized the code in the same way and I get the same benchmark results.

  • template : 330ms
  • std::function : 2702ms
  • global std::function: 330ms

So my conclusion is the raw speed of a std::function vs a template functor is pretty much the same. However it makes the job of the optimizer much more difficult.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.