Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider the following (useless) higher order function that seeks to access the Manifests of its passed function's parameters:

def foo[T <: (P1) => Unit, P1](f: T)(implicit p1: Manifest[P1]) {}

Here's an example which compiles fine:

def theFunc(i: Int) {}
def foo[T <: (P1) => Unit, P1](f: T)(implicit p1: Manifest[P1]) {}
foo(theFunc _)

Let's say we want to add an overload that supports functions of two parameters as well:

def theFunc(i: Int) {}
def foo[T <: (P1) => Unit, P1](f: T)(implicit p1: Manifest[P1]) {}
def foo[T <: (P1, P2) => Unit, P1, P2](f: T)(implicit p1: Manifest[P1], p2: Manifest[P2]) {}
foo(theFunc _)

.. compiler says not so fast:

overloaded method value foo with alternatives:
[error]   [T(in method foo)(in method foo)(in method foo)(in method foo)(in method foo)(in method foo)(in method foo)(in method foo) <: (P1, P2) => Unit, P1, P2](f: T(in method foo)(in method foo)(in method foo)(in method foo)(in method foo)(in method foo)(in method foo)(in method foo))(implicit p1: Manifest[P1], implicit p2: Manifest[P2])Unit <and>
[error]   [T(in method foo)(in method foo)(in method foo)(in method foo)(in method foo)(in method foo)(in method foo)(in method foo) <: P1 => Unit, P1](f: T(in method foo)(in method foo)(in method foo)(in method foo)(in method foo)(in method foo)(in method foo)(in method foo))(implicit p1: Manifest[P1])Unit
[error]  cannot be applied to (Int => Unit)
[error]     foo(theFunc _)
[error]     ^
[error] one error found

Ok, what if we remove the Manifest implicit parameters?

def theFunc(i: Int) {}
def foo[T <: (P1) => Unit, P1](f: T) {}
def foo[T <: (P1, P2) => Unit, P1, P2](f: T) {}
foo(theFunc _)

Compiles fine again!

What about using some differently typed implicit parameters?

def theFunc(i: Int) {}
def foo[T <: (P1) => Unit, P1](f: T)(implicit i: Int) {}
def foo[T <: (P1, P2) => Unit, P1, P2](f: T)(implicit i: Int, s: String) {}

implicit val i = 3
implicit val s = "hi"

foo(theFunc _)

Also compiles fine.

Anyone know what's going on here? I'm running Scala 2.10.0. I tried swapping TypeTags for Manifests and got the same errors, so I'm guessing it's specific to compiler supplied implicits.

Note that I'm pretty sure defining T as a type parameter is required for my true use case, because I need its TypeTag; I don't believe the existential types alternative proposed below will work.

Here's my actual code in case anyone's interested -- it's an abstraction over jsonCall in Lift to create AnonFunc JsExps from Scala functions.

Thanks!


UPDATE: Why can't I use existential types as Régis Jean-Gilles recommends?

In my real use case linked to above, I also need the TypeTag of the function being passed. What I pass isn't an anonymous function, but an object that extends Function2:

object MyFunc extends ((Int, String) => JsCmd) {
  def apply(myInt: Int, myString: String) = JsCmds.Noop
}

This allows me to read the function's parameter names via the TypeTag (see the gist).

Exercising some naïveté about existential types, I tried this:

object MyFunc extends ((Int, String) => Unit) {
  def apply(myInt: Int, myString: String) {}
}

def foo[P1, P2, T](f: T forSome { type T <: (P1, P2) => Unit})(implicit tag: TypeTag[T],  p1: Manifest[P1], p2: Manifest[P2]) = tag

foo(MyFunc)

Which of course yields:

<console>:12: error: type parameter not specified
                  foo(MyFunc)
                     ^

If I'm abusing the type system just stop me now, but if there isn't a satisfactory answer to the original issue of the overloads, doesn't this feel like a compiler bug?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The first question is why do you have such complex type parameters? Looking at your example, it seems that you could very well turn these defintition:

def foo[T <: (P1) => Unit, P1](f: T)(implicit p1: Manifest[P1]) {}
def foo[T <: (P1, P2) => Unit, P1, P2](f: T)(implicit p1: Manifest[P1], p2: Manifest[P2]) {}

into the much simpler definitions:

def foo[P1](f: P1 => Unit)(implicit p1: Manifest[P1]) {}
def foo[P1, P2](f: (P1, P2) => Unit)(implicit p1: Manifest[P1], p2: Manifest[P2]) {}

With the latter, the call to foo compiles fine.

If for some reason you really need the type T (by example your actual code defines types that extend functions and your foo methods return something that depends on the exact type of function), you could rely on existential types:

def foo[P1](f: T forSome { type T <: (P1) => Unit})(implicit p1: Manifest[P1]) {}
def foo[P1, P2](f: T forSome { type T <: (P1, P2) => Unit})(implicit p1: Manifest[P1], p2: Manifest[P2]) {}

As for why you get an error in the first place, I have honestly no conclusive explaination.


UPDATE: OK, so from your comment below it seems that my intuition was good: you over-simplified your example, as you actually do need the type parameter T.

I says seems because in all honesty I can't see how your TypeTag[T] will get you anywhere in the gist you have posted. Looking at the code, you apparently use the TypeTag only to try to extract parameter names. The problem is that you're actually getting the parameter names of the apply method of function objects. In other words, you will always get v1, v2 and so on (see by example the definition of Function2: http://www.scala-lang.org/api/current/index.html#scala.Function2) regardless of whether the function objects wraps a method with different parameter names.

That said, I'll assume from now that you do need to get a TypeTag for the function type. There is actually no problem with the first solution I gave above (the one without T parameter at all), so you might want to try again. Illustration:

def foo[P1](f: P1 => Unit)(implicit tag: TypeTag[P1 => Unit], p1: Manifest[P1]) { println( "TypeTag: " + tag ) }
def foo[P1, P2](f: (P1, P2) => Unit)(implicit tag: TypeTag[(P1, P2) => Unit], p1: Manifest[P1], p2: Manifest[P2]) { println( "TypeTag: " + tag ) }
foo(theFunc _)

Result:

TypeTag: TypeTag[Int => Unit]

Seems OK to me. So I would advise to just use that.

Note that with existentials, this won't compile at all (so I don't know where you managed to get Any):

def foo[P1](f: T forSome { type T <: (P1) => Unit})(implicit tag: TypeTag[T],  p1: Manifest[P1]) {}
def foo[P1, P2](f: T forSome { type T <: (P1, P2) => Unit})(implicit tag: TypeTag[T],  p1: Manifest[P1], p2: Manifest[P2]) {}

<console>:15: error: not found: type T
          def foo[P1, P2](f: T forSome { type T <: (P1, P2) => Unit})(implicit tag: TypeTag[T],  p1: Manifest[P1], p2: Manifest[P2]) {}
                                                                                            ^
<console>:14: error: not found: type T
          def foo[P1](f: T forSome { type T <: (P1) => Unit})(implicit tag: TypeTag[T],  p1: Manifest[P1]) {}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for you reply! I don't have prior experience with existential types. I do end up taking the TypeTag of T in my real use case, and adding it to the type parameters seems to work. For example, this compiles: def foo[P1, T](f: T forSome { type T <: P1 => Unit })(implicit tag: TypeTag[T], p1: Manifest[P1]) {} –  dacc Feb 4 '13 at 0:33
    
Actually, I take it back: T ends up as Any then, and I'm back to square one. Here's my actual use case in the event you're interested: gist.github.com/9840ae5a37d4b03c759a The goal is to accept arbitrary functions as the parameter to ServerCall() and have it compile; the code above compiles, just not usage of it. –  dacc Feb 4 '13 at 0:39
    
Fair enough. I looked at it, and updated my answer. –  Régis Jean-Gilles Feb 4 '13 at 9:27
    
Thanks for looking some more. My solution in the gist works fine without the overloads, and the original example was simplified to isolate this specific problem. I capture the parameter names by passing objects that extend Function1 et al. instead of anonymous types. So, now you can see why TypeTag[Int => Unit] will be insufficient, as what I really need is a TypeTag[MyFunction] (where MyFunction defines apply() explicitly). Hmm, I can't see how I got TypeTag[Any] now either -- must have made a mistake. I updated the question with more details. –  dacc Feb 4 '13 at 18:45
    
It turned out the Manifests in my complex type parameter solution all ended up Manifest[Nothing], so I needed your existential type approach to get anywhere at all. Instead of getting the TypeTag of the function, I'm just using a mirror instead, as I don't need any information from the erasure to get the parameter names. Thanks for your help! –  dacc Feb 5 '13 at 4:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.