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I am getting a bit of concerns about which way is the best to handle a file which has info that has to be isolated.

As example imagine a log file, which has data divided in blocks, and each block has a list of sub blocks.

Example of the log file:

data
data
data
data 
   block 1 start
    -sub block 1 start
    --data x
    --data y
    -sub block 1 end
    -sub block 2 start
    --data x
    --data marked as good
    --data z
    -sub block 2 end
    block 1 end
    block 1 summary

    block 2 start
    -sub block 1 start
    .....
    -sub block 1 end
    ....
data
data
data

I am looking for an efficient way to parse the bigger file (which is various mb of text), isolate the blocks and then in each block check for a specific line in the sub blocks. If the line is in the sub block, I will save the block start and end lines, where the sub block belongs, and the sub block where the line is ( but will discard the other sub blocks that does not have the data). Until I hit the end of the file.

Example of how the results should look like:

block 1 start
-sub block 2 start
--data marked as good
-sub block 2 end
block 1 summary
.....

As now I am using this approach: I open the file, then I divide the file in smaller subset to work with; I have 3 lists that gather the info.

the first list, called List_general, will contain the results of the parsing in the whole log file, minus what is not related to the blocks that i need to isolate. Basically after this step I will have only the blocks as in the example above, minus the "data" lines. While I do this I check for the "good data" string, so if I see that string at least once, it means that there is data that I need to process and save, otherwise I just end the function.

If there is data to process, I go line by line in list_general and start to isolate each block and sub-blocks. starting from the first block (so from block 1 start to block 1 summary, if you look at the example).

Once that I hit the end of a block (block 1 summary) ; if there is the data marked as good, I will start to parse it, going trough each sub block to find which one has the good data.

I will copy line by line of each sub block, like I did for the blocks (basically starting to copy line by line from "sub block 1 start" to "sub block 1 end") and check if the good data is in that sub block. If it is I will copy the list content to the final list, otehrwise I will delete the list and start with the next sub block.

I know that this mechanism of parsing each section is very cumbersome and expensive resource wise; so I was wondering if there is a "better" way to do this. I am pretty new to python so I am not sure how the approach to a similar issue may be faced. Hopefully someone here had a similar issue so can suggest me the best way to face this issue.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For log files I'd throw away lines that I don't care when I parse the file, stuffing anything useful in sqlite (check the module sqlite3). Then do the reporting/processing once I'm done parsing the file.

Sqlite can be configured to use disk or memory as storage - so you can choose according to your needs.

I like this approach is that it's flexible and I do not need to parse anything twice.

Added: Something similar to this?

class Parser:
    def __init__(self, logfile):
        self.log = open(logfile)
        self.logentry = []
    def next(self):
        found = False
        for line in self.log:
            self.logentry.append(line)            
            if <block ends>:
                e = '\n'.join(self.logentry)
                self.logentry = []
                yield e
share|improve this answer
    
Well, how can you parse the log file just once with your approach? I do not know which block and which sub-block has the data that I need, until I go trough it; and I need also the lines before and after the data, which in the case of the main block, could be hundreds of lines behind. Plus I should make calls to the SQL database, which seems to me more expensive than parsing a list of strings, right? Did I misunderstood your suggestion? –  newbiez Feb 4 '13 at 1:10
    
Are you working with log entries that span multiple lines? If so have a function that yields log entries so you can decide whether to store it or not. Then you do whatever processing with the lot at the end. –  Lester Cheung Feb 4 '13 at 5:28
    
Each line is basically holding a piece of data, then in the blocks you can see the block begin and end strings, followed by a carriage return to the next line, and so on. I will give a try with your example, and see if it works with my logs; you wrote 12 lines vs my 90 :) But looking at the code, it seems that it would return the whole block, and not only the sub-block that contains the useful data. –  newbiez Feb 4 '13 at 5:56
    
Just do whatever filtering you want to do before yielding then ;-) –  Lester Cheung Feb 5 '13 at 4:51

If you can identify block or sub block boundaries with just block ... start and block ... end, you can process each block as you read and store the result wherever you need it.

share|improve this answer
    
yes, this is what I am actually doing, but the problem is that I gotta go trough various pass. If 1 block has 20 sub blocks, and just 2 of them has data that I need, I will end up parsing the main block, then parse all 20 blocks and on top of that, copy the data that I need. Isn't this a lot of work to extract data? If I run 10 process analyzing 10 different log files it would just reduce the computer to a crawl right? –  newbiez Feb 4 '13 at 1:13
    
@newbiez I don't see a way around this. You must parse a sub block, be it only to see if there's useful data in it. What I don't get is, why you need multiple passes. –  Olaf Dietsche Feb 4 '13 at 1:24
    
Olaf: the multiple passes are to find which sub-block has the useful data. If I do one pass, I know that there is useful data and I know how to print just the string with the useful data, but how can I get also the block and sub block, where the data belongs to, and print it in just one pass? At the moment i do 3 pass on a substantially smaller subset each time, so the first time I parse the whole file, the second time just the blocks and sub-blocks and the third time only the sub-blocks that contains the useful data. –  newbiez Feb 4 '13 at 2:48
    
@newbiez Is one block a self contained entity? Can you decide what to do with a main block and its sub blocks, when you read just this one block? –  Olaf Dietsche Feb 4 '13 at 15:55

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