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The tests that I have written for my Django application have been working perfectly during initial development where I have been using SQLite. Now that I am getting ready to deploy I have setup a MySQL server (as that is what I'll be deploying to) but now some of my tests are failing.

Lastly the tests that are failing don't fail when I manually test the functionality.

What could be going on?

I'm not doing anything unusual, all of the views do some database shenanigans and return a response. There isn't anything timing related (no threading or anything).

The tests all inherit from django.test.TestCase and I'm not using any fixtures.

Here is an example of a test that fails.

class BaseTest(TestCase):
    def setUp(self):
        super(BaseTest, self).setUp()

        self.userCreds = dict(username='test', password='a')

        # Create an admin user
        admin = models.User.objects.create_superuser(
            email='', username='admin', password='a')

        # Create a user and grant them a licence
        user = models.User.objects.create_user(
            email='some@address.com', first_name="Mister",
            last_name="Testy", **self.userCreds)

        profile = models.getProfileFor(user)
        node = profile.createNode(
            '12345', 'acomputer', 'auser',
            'user@email.com', '0456 987 123')

        self.node = node

class TestClientUIViews(BaseTest):
    def test_toggleActive(self):
        url = reverse('toggleActive') + '?nodeId=%s' % self.node.nodeId

        self.assertFalse(self.node.active)

        # This should fail because only authenticated users can toggle a node active
        resp = self.client.get(url)
        self.assertEqual(resp.status_code, 403)
        self.assertFalse(self.node.active)

        # Login and make sure visiting the url toggles the active state
        self.client.login(**self.userCreds)
        resp = self.client.get(url)
        self.assertEqual(resp.status_code, 200)
        self.assertTrue(self.node.active)

        resp = self.client.get(url)
        self.assertEqual(resp.status_code, 200)
        self.assertFalse(self.node.active)

And here is what the model looks like:

class Node(models.Model):
    @property
    def active(self):
        '''
        Activation state gets explictly tracked in its own table but is
        exposed as a property for the sake of convenience
        '''
        activations = NodeActivation.objects \
            .filter(node=self) \
            .order_by('-datetime')

        try:
            return activations[0].active
        except IndexError:
            return False

    @active.setter
    def active(self, state):
        if self.active != state:
            NodeActivation.objects.create(node=self, active=state)

class NodeActivation(models.Model):
    node = models.ForeignKey("Node")
    datetime = models.DateTimeField(default=datetimeM.datetime.now)
    active = models.BooleanField(default=False)

My local MySQL is 5.5.19 (so its using InnoDB) but I get the same failures on the deployment server which is using 5.1.56. The tests fail regardless of the storage engine.

And as I mentioned at the beginning, if I switch back to use a SQLite database, all the tests go back to passing.

share|improve this question
    
From what test base class do your tests derive? eg TestCase. Please update your question with a simple example of a test that is failing, complete with class structure. –  Austin Phillips Feb 4 '13 at 0:46
    
What's the error message when the test is failing? Do you use some fixtures in your test or some factories? –  François Feb 4 '13 at 3:28
    
@AustinPhillips - I've added the code from one of the failing tests. It fails right at the end, the last assertion (commented) –  Hamish Feb 4 '13 at 11:30
    
@François - the error message is just "AssertionError: True is not False". I'm not using fixtures or factories. I have overridden the setUp method to populate the db with some very basic initial data however. –  Hamish Feb 4 '13 at 11:34
    
@Hamish What is self.node? If it correct that you expect the last line of your test to assertFalse when the same test above should assertTrue? –  Austin Phillips Feb 4 '13 at 12:26

2 Answers 2

With more of the actual code now revealed I'll provide the following hypothesis as to why this test is failing.

The NodeActivation model is incorrect. The datetime field should be:

datetime = models.DateTimeField(auto_now=True)

Using datetime.datetime.now() in a model definition will only be evaluated once.

Every time the setter creates a new NodeActivation record, the record will be created with the same date/time. ie The date/time that the NodeActivation model was first evaluated.

Your getter only ever returns a single result. But since both activation records have the same date/time, the ordering may be dependent on the database back end. There will be two NodeActivation records in your database at the end of the test, which one is returned is indeterminate.

share|improve this answer
    
The reason I'm using default=datetime.datetime.now (NOTE: I'm passing the function NOT the result of calling the function - django calls it when creating a new record) is because I was having a hard time getting timezones to match between the database and python. Fixing this is a TODO, but its not the reason the tests are failing (I just checked to make sure :-) ). Also I think if it was, it'd also fail with SQLite as the backing DB. –  Hamish Feb 5 '13 at 6:34
    
@Hamish Sorry, you're right. I missed that default was a function. Even so, if your tests are running fast and the datetime fields for the activation records end up with the same timestamp, how are you guaranteed of the order of results in the getter? Try adding a -id to your order_by in the getter. Better still, dump the entire contents of the NodeActivation table at each step to verify your assumptions. –  Austin Phillips Feb 5 '13 at 6:45
    
Of course! Nice thinking @Austin, thanks. Thats totally it, thanks so much! –  Hamish Feb 5 '13 at 7:05
up vote 0 down vote accepted

By changing the active property on the Node model class to this:

@property
def active(self):
    '''
    Activation state gets explictly tracked in its own table but is
    exposed as a property for the sake of convenience
    '''
    activations = NodeActivation.objects \
        .filter(node=self) \
        .order_by('-id')

    try:
        return activations[0].active
    except IndexError:
        return False

the problem goes away.

Note the change to the order_by call.

The records were getting created so quickly that ordering by datetime wasn't deterministic, hence the erratic behaviour. And I guess SQLite is just slower than MySQL which is why it wasn't a problem when using it as the backing database.

NOTE: Thanks to Austin Phillips for the tip (check out comments in his answer)

share|improve this answer
    
I think you should still have .order_by('-datetime', '-id'), just to show others that you wanted date ordered objects. –  Austin Phillips Feb 6 '13 at 6:27
    
PS. While it's perfectly ok to provide your own answer and accept it, if there are already answers which have solved your problem it's better to accept one of the existing answers. –  Austin Phillips Feb 6 '13 at 6:27

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