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I am having some issues on how to solve recurrence relations.

T(n) = T(n/2) + log2(n), T(1) = 1, where n is a power of 2

This is a homework problem, so don't just give me the answer. I was just wondering how to start the problem.

In class we went over the Master theorem. But I don't think that would be the best way to solve this particular relation.

I don't really know how to start the problem... should I just be going

T(n) = T(n/2) + log_base2(n)
T(n/2) = [T(n/4)+log_base2(n/2)]
  T(n) = [T(n/4)+log_base2(n/2)] + log_base2(n) 

And just keep working my way down to get something I can see makes a basic equation?

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This question appears to be off-topic because it is not a programming question. Try math.stackexchange.com. –  Raymond Chen Nov 5 '13 at 2:51
    
This question is off-topic for Stack Overflow because it is not about programming. Math questions may be asked on Mathematics Stack Exchange. –  Ilmari Karonen May 5 at 17:28
    
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is about math, not programming. –  Pang May 6 at 1:48

3 Answers 3

This can be done with the Akra-Bazzi theorem. See the third example in http://people.mpi-inf.mpg.de/~mehlhorn/DatAlg2008/NewMasterTheorem.pdf.

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If n is a power of 2 then you can just expand out the recurrence and solve exactly, using that lg(a/b) = lg(a) - lg(b).

T(n) = lg(n) + lg(n/2) + lg(n/4) + ... + lg(1) + 1
     = (lg(n) - 0) + (lg(n) - 1) .... + (lg(n) - lg(n)) + 1
     = lg(n)*lg(n) - lg(n)*(lg(n)+1)/2 + 1
     = lg(n)*lg(n)/2 - lg(n)/2 + 1
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If you know that n is a perfect power of two (that is, n = 2k), you can rewrite teh recurrence as

T(2k) = T(2k-1) + k

Let's define a new recurrence S(k) = T(2k). Then we get that

S(k) = S(k - 1) + k

If we expand out this recurrence, we get that

S(k) = S(k - 1) + k

= S(k - 2) + (k - 1) + k

= S(k - 3) + (k - 2) + (k - 1) + k

= S(k - 4) + (k - 3) + (k - 2) + (k - 1) + k

...

= S(0) + 1 + 2 + 3 + ... + k

= S(0) + Θ(k2)

Assuming S(0) = 1, then this recurrence solves to Θ(k2).

Since S(k) = T(2k) = T(n), we get that T(n) = Θ(k2) = Θ(log2 n).

Hope this helps!

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