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I'm experimenting with some document classification task and SVM works well so far on TF*IDF feature vectors. I want to incorporate some new features that are not term frequency based (e.g. document length) and see if these new features contribute towards classification performance. I'm having the following questions:

  1. can I simply concatenate the new features with the old term frequency based features and train an SVM on this heterogeneous feature space?
  2. if not, is Multiple Kernel Learning the way to go about it by training a kernel on each sub feature space and combine them using linear interpolation? (we still don't have MKL implemented in scikit-learn, right?)
  3. or shall I turn to alternative learners that handle heterogeneous features well, such as MaxEnt and decision trees?

Thank you in advance for your kind advise!

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Are you using some form of sparse matrix to represent your text ? For example you might have around 5k unique words in your dataset. Does each instance have 5K worth of numbers to represent each feature or is there a feature value mapping to reduce memory? –  steve Feb 4 '13 at 9:45
    
@steve Yes I'm using a sparse matrix to represent the feature space -- scipy.sparse.coo_matrix to be specific. Roughly 5K unique words are used as features. –  Moses Xu Feb 4 '13 at 12:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

1) can I simply concatenate the new features with the old term frequency based features and train an SVM on this heterogeneous feature space?

Since you tagged this with scikit-learn: yes, you can, and you can use FeatureUnion to do it for you.

2) if not, is Multiple Kernel Learning the way to go about it by training a kernel on each sub feature space and combine them using linear interpolation? (we still don't have MKL implemented in scikit-learn, right?)

Linear SVMs are the standard model for this task. Kernel methods are too slow for real-world text classification (except maybe with training algorithms like LaSVM, but that's not implemented in scikit-learn).

3) or shall I turn to alternative learners that handle heterogeneous features well, such as MaxEnt and decision trees?

SVMs handle heterogenous features just as well as MaxEnt/logistic regression. In both cases, you really must input scaled data, e.g. with MinMaxScaler. Note that scikit-learn's TfidfTransformer produces normalized vectors by default, so you don't need to scale its output, just the other features.

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It is quite possible to use arbitrary features, and feature combinations, with an SVM. One thing to bear in mind is that you should standardise your features, which just means that they should all be on the same scale. This will prevent accidental weighting of the feature spaces.

If this fails to produce acceptable results, you can look at convolution kernels, which provide a framework for combining kernels in different feature spaces into a single kernel. However, I would be surprised if this is necessary.

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good answer @Ben. Regarding to point 3 in the question: trying more learners is always a good idea. Rule of thumb in ML is to start with easy "white box" learners (such as decision trees) and then continue to higher weights such as SVM, neural networks,... –  xhudik Feb 4 '13 at 19:07

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