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I am a ruby programmer and I really like to do TDD. Right now, I am programming a little bit in C, but I like my tools and the way I program with ruby. So, I am searching for a framework to do unit tests in C. What do you can tell me about it?

I already found some options, like: cunit, cmockery, CuTest and others. The problem is, I don't know how to evaluate the best one. I am writing a simple compiler for my compilers college course.

Could you help me?

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I would like to have something simple,as CUTest (cutest.sourceforge.net) but I also would like to have something with a great output, as Cutter (cutter.sourceforge.net). But it really seems that I can't have both. –  Hugo Barauna Sep 23 '09 at 21:52
    
I'd like to see an answer to this question too. –  Robert S. Barnes Mar 11 '11 at 6:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use any C or C++ unit testing framework. Its easy enough to call C functions from C++.

My opinion is that you want to have as little output as possible from your tests. ie if everything is OK, it should print '100% passed'. Otherwise it should only print out details of test failures.

see xprogramming.com, scroll down to the Unit Testing table and look for the C Language or C++ frameworks. The most 'standard' it seems is cppUnit.

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In many environments that use C, you can only use C. So C++ frameworks probably aren't useful here, especially since the OP is talking about a compiler course in college which likely is not going to let him use C++ in his project. –  Robert S. Barnes Mar 11 '11 at 6:15
    
Its true that, for example, an embedded C compiler which runs under windows, but targets a microcontroller only compiles C, but it would be easy enough to compile your code in, say, Visual Studio. You can then write tests in C++ with whatever C++ unit testing framework you want. –  quamrana Mar 11 '11 at 11:52

I've used gtest and found it to be pretty easy to use (It is C++ though). Really though, it doesn't matter too much which one you pick. Just pick one and learn it.

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In many environments that use C, you can only use C. So C++ frameworks probably aren't useful here, especially since the OP is talking about a compiler course in college which likely is not going to let him use C++ in his project. –  Robert S. Barnes Mar 11 '11 at 6:16
1  
gtest is the only testing framework i've liked in c/c++ –  Matt Joiner Mar 11 '11 at 9:45
    
AFAIK gtest can also be used with C, as it only makes use of macros, so there shouldn't be any C++ dependency. –  helpermethod Mar 14 '11 at 9:38

There's a wiki page which lists info on around 20 C compatible unit testing frameworks. While it may not be enough info to make a decision, it is a decent starting point.

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Unity, a test framework for C has a rich set of assertions including bitwise and memory block comparisons. If you're not dealing with a large legacy codebase I'd recommend using Ceedling, the parent project of Unity. Ceedling builds your Unity tests, production code and integrates a nice mocking framework called CMock. CMock can auto-generate a mock/substitute for a module from it's public interface header.

There's a video showing you how to get started with Ceedling and Unity. (DISCLAIMER: I created the video).

An alternative, is CppUTest. It compiles to 1 static library (2 if you want to use it's mocking framework, CppUMock). Tests are written in C++ and it integrates with your existing makefile project. It also offers memory leak detection alternatives for malloc/free, new/delete. By comparison, it's assertions are not as comprehensive as Unity, but it's probably better suited to testing C/C++ legacy projects.

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