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I am making an application that will give me the Mean, Medium and Range of the numbers that have been inserted by the user.
But I cannot seem to add the numbers and then divide them by two.
Here's what I attempted:

    public static String Find_Mean()
    {
        int Number = 0;
        for (int size = 0; size < list.Count; size++)
        {
            Number = Convert.ToInt16(list[size].ToString());
            Number += Number;
        }
        int Final_Number = Number / 2;
        return Convert.ToString(Final_Number);
    }

What I want to do is add all the numbers together from the arraylist then divide them by 2.

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2  
Why do you use string when work with ints? Use List<int> instead! –  abatishchev Feb 4 '13 at 7:53
3  
This needs improvement: Convert.ToInt16(list[size].ToString()). Looks as if you would use string as base type for all. –  Tim Schmelter Feb 4 '13 at 7:55

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

you are re-assigning the value for Number here:

for (int size = 0; size < list.Count; size++)
{
    Number = Convert.ToInt16(list[size].ToString());
    Number += Number;
}     

try this:

for (int size = 0; size < list.Count; size++)
{
    Number += Convert.ToInt16(list[size].ToString());
}     
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Try using Linq:

 int[] x;
 x.Average();
 x.Max();
 x.Min();
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1  
I agree with you, but it may be a homework :) –  AliRıza Adıyahşi Feb 4 '13 at 7:56
Number = Convert.ToInt32(list[size].ToString());

You are overwriting the value of number with each iteration here.

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Each time you are Setting the Number to your array list element in the loop and overwriting your total, that is why you are not getting the total. You need to use a separate variable for maintaining total. Something like:

int Number = 0;
int Total = 0;
for (int size = 0; size < list.Count; size++)
{
    Number = Convert.ToInt16(list[size].ToString());
    Total += Number;
}
int Final_Number = Total / 2;

If you are using .Net 2.0 or higher then its better if you can use a generic list List<int>.

You can also change your conversion to number in the loop to:

Number = Convert.ToInt32(list[0]);

Since Convert.ToInt32 has an overload for object types as well, also if your number is of type int, then its is Int32 not Int16.

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Here is what i'm currently using to calculate some easy statistics:

private void CalculateStatistics(IEnumerable<Double> valuesToAggregate)
{
    // We need to iterate multiple times over the values, so it makes
    // sense to create a list to improve performance.
    var aggregateMe = valuesToAggregate.ToList();

    if (aggregateMe.Count > 0)
    {
        // To calculate the median, the simplest approach
        // is to sort the list.
        aggregateMe.Sort();

        // Cause we already sorted the list,
        // the min value must be available within the first element.
        Min = aggregateMe[0];

        // the max value must be available within the last element.
        Max = aggregateMe[aggregateMe.Count - 1];

        // The average has really to be calculated, by another iteration run.
        Mean = aggregateMe.Average();

        // Taking the median from a sorted list is easy.
        var midpoint = (aggregateMe.Count - 1) / 2;
        Median = aggregateMe[midpoint];

        // If the list contains a even number of element,
        // the median is the average of the two elements around the midpoint.
        if (aggregateMe.Count % 2 == 0)
            Median = (Median + aggregateMe[midpoint + 1]) / 2;
    }
    else
    {
        // There is no value available to calculate some statistic.
        Min = Double.NaN;
        Max = Double.NaN;
        Mean = Double.NaN;
        Median = Double.NaN;
    }
}

Be aware that you maybe can improve this specific implementation, depending what kind of data you get in (strings, doubles, etc.) and how they are already stored (do they come into already as a list you are allowed to manipulate, etc?).

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public static String Find_Mean()
{
    List<int> integerList = list.Select(q => int.Parse(q)).ToList();
    var result = integerList.Sum() / 2;
    return result.ToString();
}
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