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module Module1
  class Base1
    class << self
      attr_accessor :attr1, :attr2
      def configure
        yield(self) if block_given?
      end
    end
  end
end 

module Module1
  class Child1 < Base1
     def self.some_method1
       #... some stuff
       "#{attr1}_123"  #for some reason attr1 is nil
     end
  end
end 


  Module1::Base1.configure do |item|
    item.method1 = "43243243"
    item.method2 = "fdsfdsfd"
  end




  data1 = Module1::Child1.some_method1 #it doesn't return what I expect

For some reason attr1 in Child1#some_method1 is nil unlike in Module1::Base1.method1 where it has a value. I wonder why and what should I do to get rid of that?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First of all, I guess there should be s/method/attr/g in:

Module1::Base1.configure do |item|
  item.method1 = "43243243"
  item.method2 = "fdsfdsfd"
end

Secondary, in some_method1 we’d call eigenclass’ attr:

#... some stuff
"#{Base1.attr1}_123"  #for some reason attr1 is nil

yielding:

#!/usr/bin/ruby

module Module1
  class Base1
    class << self
      attr_accessor :attr1, :attr2
      def configure
        yield(self) if block_given?
      end
    end
  end
end 

module Module1
  class Child1 < Base1
     def self.some_method1
       #... some stuff
       "#{Base1.attr1}_123"  #for some reason attr1 is nil
     end
  end
end

Module1::Base1.configure do |item|
  item.attr1 = "43243243"
  item.attr2 = "fdsfdsfd"
end

puts Module1::Child1.some_method1 #it does return what I expect

Gives:

$ /tmp/a.rb
43243243_123
share|improve this answer

attr_accessor creates instance variables, so your code is creating class instance variables: since classes are objects they can have instance variables too. These variables aren't inherited.

There are also class variables (@@foo), which can be surprising - if you change the value in a derived class it changes it for the entire hierarchy.

Ruby doesn't have a type of variable which is inherited in the same way that method inheritance works. Libraries such as active support add a version of attr_accessor (active support calls it class_attribute) which sets up the right hooks to create accessors that behave like this - you could have a look at the source for that

share|improve this answer
    
so what of that? –  Marius Kavansky Feb 4 '13 at 8:03
    
Is something unclear? –  Frederick Cheung Feb 4 '13 at 8:09
    
the question is how to avoid that and not why does it happen. –  Marius Kavansky Feb 4 '13 at 8:12
    
Last three word of the question: "I wonder why?" –  Haile Feb 4 '13 at 8:13
    
you're right, I'm going to make it clearer. –  Marius Kavansky Feb 4 '13 at 8:13

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