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EDIT: below

I have one thread responsible for streaming data from a device in buffers. In addition, I have N threads doing some processing on that data. In my setup, I would like the streamer thread to fetch data from the device, and wait until the N threads are done with the processing before fetching new data or a timeout is reached. The N threads should wait until new data has been fetched before continuing to process. I believe that this framework should work if I don't want the N threads to repeat processing on a buffer and if I want all buffers to be processed without skipping any.

After careful reading, I found that condition variables is what I needed. I have followed tutorials and other stack overflow questions, and this is what I have:

global variables:

boost::condition_variable cond;
boost::mutex mut;

member variables:

std::vector<double> buffer
std::vector<bool> data_ready       // Size equal to number of threads

data receiver loop (1 thread runs this):

while (!gotExitSignal())
{
    {
        boost::unique_lock<boost::mutex> ll(mut);
        while(any(data_ready))
            cond.wait(ll);
    }

    receive_data(buffer);

    {
        boost::lock_guard<boost::mutex> ll(mut);
        set_true(data_ready);
    }

    cond.notify_all();
}

data processing loop (N threads run this)

while (!gotExitSignal())
{
    {
        boost::unique_lock<boost::mutex> ll(mut);
        while(!data_ready[thread_id])
            cond.wait(ll);
    }

    process_data(buffer);

    {
        boost::lock_guard<boost::mutex> ll(mut);
        data_ready[thread_id] = false;
    }
    cond.notify_all();
}

These two loops are in their own member functions of the same class. The variable buffer is a member variable, so it can be shared across threads.

The receiver thread will be launched first. The data_ready variable is a vector of bools of size N. data_ready[i] is true if data is ready to be processed and false if the thread has already processed data. The function any(data_ready) outputs true if any of the elements of data_ready is true, and false otherwise. The set_true(data_ready) function sets all of the elements of data_ready to true. The receiver thread will check if any processing thread still is processing. If not, it will fetch data, set the data_ready flags, notify the threads, and continue with the loop which will stop at the beginning until processing is done. The processing threads will check their respective data_ready flag to be true. Once it is true, the processing thread will do some computations, set its respective data_ready flag to 0, and continue with the loop.

If I only have one processing thread, the program runs fine. Once I add more threads, I'm getting into issues where the output of the processing is garbage. In addition, the order of the processing threads matters for some reason; in other words, the LAST thread I launch will output correct data whereas the previous threads will output garbage, no matter what the input parameters are for the processing (assuming valid parameters). I don't know if the problem is due to my threading code or if there is something wrong with my device or data processing setup. I try using couts at the processing and receiving steps, and with N processing threads, I see the output as it should:

receive data
process 1
process 2
...
process N
receive data
process 1
process 2
...

Is the usage of the condition variables correct? What could be the problem?

EDIT: I followed fork's suggestions and changed the code to:

data receiver loop (1 thread runs this):

while (!gotExitSignal())
{
    if(!any(data_ready))
    {
        receive_data(buffer);
        boost::lock_guard<boost::mutex> ll(mut);
        set_true(data_ready);
        cond.notify_all();
    }       
}

data processing loop (N threads run this)

while (!gotExitSignal())
{
    // boost::unique_lock<boost::mutex> ll(mut);
    boost::mutex::scoped_lock ll(mut);
    cond.wait(ll);

    process_data(buffer);

    data_ready[thread_id] = false;
}

It works somewhat better. Am I using the correct locks?

share|improve this question
    
what does any function check? Any true or any false? –  peper0 Feb 4 '13 at 9:32
    
any true. It returns true if any element is true –  Damian Feb 4 '13 at 9:33
    
channel_id and thread_id are the same id, right? And process_data(buffer); should do rather process_data(buffer[thread_id]);? Same with process_data? –  peper0 Feb 4 '13 at 9:34
    
Yeah, you are right: thread_id and channel_id is the same. I only get one buffer and the same buffer is used for the data processing. Each thread uses different parameters though. –  Damian Feb 4 '13 at 9:42
    
Your "EDIT"ed version is invalid, previous was much better. It's perfectry valid to lock the mutex, check condition and then wait for condition. –  peper0 Feb 4 '13 at 23:18

1 Answer 1

I did not read your whole story but if i look at the code quickly i see that you use conditions wrong. A condition is like a state, once you set a thread in a waiting condition it gives away the cpu. So your thread will effectively stop running untill some other process/thread notifies it.

In your code you have a while loop and each time you check for data you wait. That is wrong, it should be an if instead of a while. But then again it should not be there. The checking for data should be done somewhere else. And your worker thread should put itself in waiting condition after it has done its work.

Your worker threads are the consumers. And the producers are the ones that deliver the data. I think a better construction would be to make a thread check if there is data and notify the worker(s).

PSEUDO CODE:

//producer
while (true) {

    1. lock mutex
    2. is data available
    3. unlock mutex

    if (dataAvailableVariable) {
        4. notify a worker
        5. set waiting condition
    }
}


//consumer
while (true) {
    1. lock mutex
    2. do some work
    3. unlock mutex
    4. notify producer that work is done
    5. set wait condition
}

You should also take care of the fact that some thread needs to be alive in order to avoid a deadlock, means all threads in waiting condition.

I hope that helps you a little.

share|improve this answer
    
You mean the inner while loops after the mutexes? –  Damian Feb 4 '13 at 8:46
    
while(any(data_ready)) cond.wait(ll); this one –  fonZ Feb 4 '13 at 8:50
    
Thank you so much! What happens if I want the producer to wait for the worker threads to be done? Should I use the while loop in that case for the producer? –  Damian Feb 4 '13 at 8:52
    
Well you could notify the producer. If there is no data available you can make him wait and make the worker threads notify just before they wait. –  fonZ Feb 4 '13 at 8:54
1  
I adjusted the pseudo code a little, check it out. I think it might be better to wait just after you notify a worker. –  fonZ Feb 4 '13 at 9:12

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