Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
import java.math.BigInteger;
import java.util.ArrayList;

public class Factorial {

    public static int[] bitVector(int n) {
        ArrayList<Integer> bitList = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        BigInteger input = computeFactorial(n);
        System.out.println(input);
        BigInteger[] result = input.divideAndRemainder(new BigInteger(String.valueOf(2)));
        if (result[0].intValue()==0) {return new int[]{result[1].intValue()};}
        else {
            bitList.add(result[1].intValue());
        }
        while(result[0].intValue() != 0) {
            result = result[0].divideAndRemainder(new BigInteger(String.valueOf(2)));
            bitList.add(result[1].intValue());
        }
        int[] array = new int[bitList.size()];
        for (int i=0; i<array.length; i++) {
            array[i]=bitList.get(i).intValue();
        }
        return array;
    }

    public static BigInteger computeFactorial(int n) {
        if (n==0) {
            return new BigInteger(String.valueOf(1));
        } else {
            return new BigInteger(String.valueOf(n)).multiply(computeFactorial(n-1));
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int[] bitVector = bitVector(35);
        for (int bit: bitVector)
        System.out.print(bit+" ");
        System.out.println();
    }
}

The code above works fine when the input to bitVector is no bigger than 35. However, when I pass 36 as a parameter to bitVector, all but one bit are gone in the output.

I have potentially ruled out the following causes:

  1. It may have nothing to do with the BigInteger type since it was designed to never overflow.

  2. It may not be related to memory usage of the program, which uses only 380M at runtime.

  3. I print out the value of computeFactorial(36), which looks good.

What on earth is going on there?

share|improve this question
1  
BigInteger.testBit and also BigInteger.valueOf might be of interest. –  Joop Eggen Feb 4 '13 at 9:12
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

So what you are trying to do is

public static String factorialAsBinary(int n) {
    BigInteger bi = BigInteger.ONE;
    for (; n > 1; n--)
        bi = bi.multiply(BigInteger.valueOf(n));
    return bi.toString(2);
}

public static void main(String... args) {
    String fact36 = factorialAsBinary(36);
    for (char ch : fact36.toCharArray())
        System.out.print(ch + " ");
    System.out.println();
}

which prints

1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

What on earth is going on there?

Your code is much more complicated than it needs to be which also makes it easier to make mistakes and harder to understand.

share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks for this beautiful code. Problem solved. –  Terry Li Feb 4 '13 at 9:26
add comment

result[0].intValue() is wrong:

intValue():

Converts this BigInteger to an int. This conversion is analogous to a narrowing primitive conversion from long to int as defined in the Java Language Specification: if this BigInteger is too big to fit in an int, only the low-order 32 bits are returned. Note that this conversion can lose information about the overall magnitude of the BigInteger value as well as return a result with the opposite sign.

in your case it returns the lowest 32 bits which are zero therefore you return 0 after first devision

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for making it clear for me. Very helpful! –  Terry Li Feb 4 '13 at 9:27
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.