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Code as follows:

char *p=malloc(200);
p=NULL;

Now that I've NULLed p, is there any way in which I can use those 200 bytes of memory again? If not, can I at least free them?

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closed as not constructive by StoryTeller, billz, David Heffernan, Blue Moon, chris Feb 5 '13 at 5:48

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No you can't, so don't lose it. –  StoryTeller Feb 4 '13 at 9:32
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"Doctor, it hurts when I bang my head against the wall. How can I stop it from hurting?" –  R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 4 '13 at 9:33
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes Attach a pillow to the wall. –  stefan Feb 4 '13 at 9:34
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@stefan Then I wouldn't be hitting the wall –  AsheeshR Feb 4 '13 at 9:35
    
I would love to know why you would want to do that. –  David Heffernan Feb 4 '13 at 9:36
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5 Answers 5

before calling p=NULL; use free(p);

but before freeing the memory if u assign the pointer to NULL it will become lost...

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1  
This does not regain the memory, that prevents it being leaked in the first place. Not the same thing –  thecoshman Feb 4 '13 at 9:40
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No you cannot you donated it to Mr. No-one one when you did,

p = NULL;

And since Mr. No-one is selfish he will not return you anything given to him. He will only give it back to your OS when your program ends and the process in which your application runs exits.

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He will only give it back to your OS when your program ends and the process in which your application runs exits. Speaking strictly, in the context of the c++ tag, this is not a given. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 4 '13 at 9:37
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@LightnessRacesinOrbit: In context of most(read all) it is a given. –  Alok Save Feb 4 '13 at 9:43
    
Abstraction is healthy. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 4 '13 at 9:46
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You always need a pointer to hold the memory position otherwise you can't get it back.

char *p=malloc(200);
char *p2 = p;
p = NULL;
free(p2);   
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Pointers do not "hold" 200 byte memory blocks. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 4 '13 at 9:40
    
fine, they hold a handle for that 200 byte memory block –  thecoshman Feb 4 '13 at 9:41
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As it stands, there is no way to get that memory back. You could prevent losing it, but not get it back. The only option is to exit the program.

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¬_¬ spelling... –  thecoshman Feb 4 '13 at 9:39
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This is only possible if you use a garbage collector, such as the Boehm-Demers-Weiser collector. If you cannot use a garbage collector, then the memory cannot be reclaimed.

Of course, the memory is reclaimed if you call free(p) before setting p = NULL, but you knew that already.

And furthermore, the memory will be reclaimed automatically by the operating system if you exec() or if the process exits.

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the memory is reclaimed if you call free(p) before setting p = NULL, but you knew that already. Are you sure? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 4 '13 at 9:38
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: I choose to be sure. –  Dietrich Epp Feb 4 '13 at 9:40
    
That's your prerogative, I suppose. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 4 '13 at 9:41
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