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We're using VisualSVN Server as SVN server in Windows. But it has very limited abilities for managing rights. Also we couldn't use svn_access_file because our users are going to be authenticated using Windows Authentication method.

Is there any tool to manage rights that uses/supports Windows Authentication?

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1  
Limited abilities for managing rights? What exactly do you miss? You can always post your feedback at visualsvn.com/server. –  bahrep Feb 4 '13 at 11:04
2  
Hire good admin, baby! –  Lazy Badger Feb 4 '13 at 11:27
    
@bahrep For example Reporting ability :) Our Project Manager need to know which user has access to which part of repository. There is such tools like svn-access-manager.org but we want to prevent from engaging php/apache/mysql directly :) [We're lazy and we know it] –  Sadegh Feb 4 '13 at 15:08
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@Sadegh you can use WMI in Powershell or VBScript to format such access rules report. Create a new StackOverflow question and specify the reporting tool requirements and I'll try to help you. –  bahrep Feb 4 '13 at 15:17
    
I think i can figure it out and doesn't seems that another question is required at this time :) I'll ask for help if there is any questions in future. –  Sadegh Feb 4 '13 at 15:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

it has very limited abilities for managing rights

It has all abilities, that Subversion has per se.

we couldn't use svn_access_file

You can and must really, because Windows Authentication define only method of authentication, svn_access_file is authorization file and can refer and use usernames, obtained at authentication stage.

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I know that there is authz file under %Repositories% dir, but not about authz-windows :P For limited abilities refer to comment replied to @bahrep –  Sadegh Feb 4 '13 at 15:11

Check SVNBook and VisualSVN KB article for description of path-based authorization. This is not Windows Access Control, it's path-based authorization and you should understand the difference.

I'm confused by the question, in fact. VisualSVN Server has a nice GUI implemented as MMC snap-in, allows you to manage svn users / groups and access right via a familiar GUI. When you use Windows Authentication you manage users and groups via standard Windows / Active Directory tools.

Moreover you can manage VisualSVN Server via WMI (Windows Management Instrumentation) interface via it's own WMI provider. This means that you can write a script on VBScript, Powershell, C# etc. to automate maintenance tasks such as repository creation, access rights management, event log parsing etc.

MOF file which describes the VisualSVN Server interface resides in the %VISUALSVN_SERVER%\WMI on the computer where VisualSVN Server is installed. You can use this file as a reference when writing a script. If you want to dig the VisualSVN Server WMI Provider deeper I strongly advise to get WMI Administrative Tools, they will help you to explore WMI.

The below scripts are rough samples that show how to add user permissions with Powershell commands.

Here is a simple sample Powershell code that will set Read / Write access permission for SVN user "username" on repository "MyProject" (path "/trunk") (works with VisualSVN Server 2.5, but will not with 2.6 where it can be done a bit easier):

$userinput = "username" #SVN username
$pathinput = "/trunk" #RepositoryPath
$repoinput = "MyProject" #RepositoryName

#Getting repository name and path to pass to SetSecurity() method
$associatedobject = ([wmiclass]"root\VisualSVN:VisualSVN_RepositoryEntry").CreateInstance()
$associatedobject.Path = $pathinput
$associatedobject.RepositoryName = $repoinput

#Getting object of "VisualSVN_User" class (i.e. user account object).
$getuser = Get-WmiObject -namespace Root\VisualSVN -Class VisualSVN_User -Filter "name='$userinput'"

#Creating "VisualSVN_PermissionEntry" instance to pass to SetSecurity() method
$permission_entry = ([wmiclass]"root\VisualSVN:VisualSVN_PermissionEntry").CreateInstance()
                    $permission_entry.AccessLevel = 2
                    $permission_entry.Account = $getuser

#Runnning the SetSecurity() method with our arguments
Invoke-WmiMethod -namespace root\visualsvn -class visualsvn_securitydescriptor -Name SetSecurity -ArgumentList $associatedobject.__RELPATH, $permission_entry
#Done!

Updated on 18/02/2013:

And here comes another PowerShell script sample. While above script works for Subversion authentication and authorization, it does not work with Windows and Active Directory accounts. This one works with Windows and Active Directory accounts like a charm.

The script does not perform any checks or validation on Windows / Active Directory account SID. I.e. it does not check whether account with SID specified in $SID property exists. Ideally you should get SID value with powershell commands get-aduser and get-adgroup and then pass it's SID to $getuser object.

$pathinput = "/branches"    #RepositoryPath
$repoinput = "MyProject2" #RepositoryName
$SID = "S-1-5-21-0123456789-9876543210-123456789-1699"

#Getting repository name and path to pass to SetSecurity() method
$associatedobject = ([wmiclass]"root\VisualSVN:VisualSVN_RepositoryEntry").CreateInstance()
$associatedobject.Path = $pathinput
$associatedobject.RepositoryName = $repoinput

#Creating object of "VisualSVN_WindowsAccount" class (i.e. user account object).
$getuser = ([wmiclass]"root\VisualSVN:VisualSVN_WindowsAccount").CreateInstance()
$getuser.SID = $SID #Setting SID property on $getuser object

#Creating "VisualSVN_PermissionEntry" instance to pass to SetSecurity() method
$permission_entry = ([wmiclass]"root\VisualSVN:VisualSVN_PermissionEntry").CreateInstance()
                    $permission_entry.AccessLevel = 2
                    $permission_entry.Account = $getuser

#Runnning the SetSecurity() method with our arguments
Invoke-WmiMethod -namespace root\visualsvn -class visualsvn_securitydescriptor -Name SetSecurity -ArgumentList $associatedobject.__RELPATH, $permission_entry
#Done!

Updated on 02/10/2013:

WMI schema has been changed (and improved!) in VisualSVN Server 2.6. This WMI-based PowerShell script works with VisualSVN Server 2.6 and newer.

In short, to set access permissions on a repository path, you are required to:

  • create VisualSVN_Repository class object specifying repository name,
  • create VisualSVN_PermissionEntry entry object specifying account username and access permissions,
  • invoke SetSecurity method on VisualSVN_Repository passing valid repository path and PermissionEntry object.

$userinput = "user" #SVN username
$pathinput = "/trunk" #RepositoryPath
$repoinput = "MyProject" #RepositoryName

#Getting repository name to pass to SetSecurity() method
$repoobject = ([wmiclass]"root\VisualSVN:VisualSVN_Repository").CreateInstance()
$repoobject.Name = $repoinput

#Getting object of "VisualSVN_User" class (i.e. user account object).
$getuser = Get-WmiObject -namespace Root\VisualSVN -Class VisualSVN_User -Filter "name='$userinput'"

#Creating "VisualSVN_PermissionEntry" instance to pass to SetSecurity() method
$permission_entry = ([wmiclass]"root\VisualSVN:VisualSVN_PermissionEntry").CreateInstance()
                    $permission_entry.AccessLevel = 2
                    $permission_entry.Account = $getuser

$repoobject.SetSecurity($pathinput, $permission_entry, 0)
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It seems to me that we have to write a tool for implementing features like reporting on rights for an specific user; so WMI is one of choices we have to deal with. Thanks –  Sadegh Feb 4 '13 at 15:16

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