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I need to convert a R data.frame object into a SpatialPointsDataFrame object in order to run spatial statistics functions on the data. However, for some reason converting a data.frame object into a SpatialPointsDataFrame give an unexpected behavior when running specific functions on the converted object.

In this example I try to run head() function on the resulting SpatialPointsDataFrame Why does the function head() fail on some SpatialPointsDataFrame objects?

Here is the code to reproduce the behavior.

Example 1, no error:

#beginning of r code
#load S Classes and Methods for Spatial Data package "sp"
library(sp)
#Load an example dataset that contain geographic ccoordinates
data(meuse)
#check the structure of the data, it is a data.frame
str(meuse)
#>'data.frame':  155 obs. of  14 variables: ...
#with coordinates x,y
#Convert the data into a SpatialPointsDataFrame, by function coordinates()
coordinates(meuse) <- c("x", "y")
#check structure, seems ok
str(meuse)
#Check first rows of the data
head(meuse)
#It worked!
#Now create a small own dataset
testgeo <- as.data.frame(cbind(1:10,1:10,1:10))
#set colnames
colnames(testgeo) <- c("x", "y", "myvariable")
#convert to SpatialPointsDataFrame
coordinates(testgeo) <- c("x", "y")
#Seems ok
str(testgeo)
#But try running for instance head()
head(testgeo)
#Resulting output: Error in `[.data.frame`(x@data, i, j, ..., drop = FALSE) : 
#undefined columns selected
#end of example code

There is some difference between the two example datasets that I do not understand. Function str() does not reveal the difference?

Why does the function head() fail on the dataset testgeo?

Why does head() work when adding more columns, 10 seems to be the limit:

testgeo <- as.data.frame(cbind(1:10,1:10,1:10,1:10,1:10,1:10,1:10,1:10))
coordinates(testgeo) <- c("V1", "V2")
head(testgeo)
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2 Answers 2

There is no specific head method for SpatialPoints/PolygonsDataFrames, so when you call head(testgeo) or head(meuse) it falls through to the default method:

> getAnywhere("head.default")
A single object matching ‘head.default’ was found
It was found in the following places
  registered S3 method for head from namespace utils
  namespace:utils
with value

function (x, n = 6L, ...) 
{
    stopifnot(length(n) == 1L)
    n <- if (n < 0L) 
        max(length(x) + n, 0L)
    else min(n, length(x))
    x[seq_len(n)]
}
<bytecode: 0x97dee18>
<environment: namespace:utils>

What this does is then returns x[1:n], but for those spatial classes, square bracket indexing like that takes columns:

> meuse[1]
        coordinates cadmium
1  (181072, 333611)    11.7
2  (181025, 333558)     8.6
3  (181165, 333537)     6.5
4  (181298, 333484)     2.6
5  (181307, 333330)     2.8
6  (181390, 333260)     3.0
7  (181165, 333370)     3.2
8  (181027, 333363)     2.8
9  (181060, 333231)     2.4
10 (181232, 333168)     1.6
> meuse[2]
        coordinates copper
1  (181072, 333611)     85
2  (181025, 333558)     81
3  (181165, 333537)     68
4  (181298, 333484)     81
5  (181307, 333330)     48
6  (181390, 333260)     61
7  (181165, 333370)     31
8  (181027, 333363)     29
9  (181060, 333231)     37
10 (181232, 333168)     24

So when you do head(meuse) it tries to get meuse[1] to meuse[6], which exist because meuse has lots of columns.

But testgeo doesn't. So it fails.

The real fix might be to write a head.SpatialPointsDataFrame that goes:

> head.SpatialPointsDataFrame = function(x,n=6,...){x[1:n,]}

so that:

> head(meuse)
       coordinates cadmium copper lead zinc  elev       dist   om ffreq soil
1 (181072, 333611)    11.7     85  299 1022 7.909 0.00135803 13.6     1    1
2 (181025, 333558)     8.6     81  277 1141 6.983 0.01222430 14.0     1    1
3 (181165, 333537)     6.5     68  199  640 7.800 0.10302900 13.0     1    1
4 (181298, 333484)     2.6     81  116  257 7.655 0.19009400  8.0     1    2
5 (181307, 333330)     2.8     48  117  269 7.480 0.27709000  8.7     1    2
6 (181390, 333260)     3.0     61  137  281 7.791 0.36406700  7.8     1    2
  lime landuse dist.m
1    1      Ah     50
2    1      Ah     30
3    1      Ah    150
4    0      Ga    270
5    0      Ah    380
6    0      Ga    470
> head(testgeo)
  coordinates myvariable
1      (1, 1)          1
2      (2, 2)          2
3      (3, 3)          3
4      (4, 4)          4
5      (5, 5)          5
6      (6, 6)          6

The real real problem here is that the spatial classes don't inherit from data.frame, so they don't behave like them.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Thanks for explaining the reason why head didn't behave as expected. –  plannapus Feb 4 '13 at 11:00
    
Thank you! Now I get it! –  GeogRaphy Feb 4 '13 at 11:08
    
+1 Educational summary –  SlowLearner Feb 4 '13 at 11:10
    
Actually the real real fix is to dump the sp classes and do something more like what PostGIS does - have a column that stores the geometry. I have a proof of concept that stores the geometry as a WKT text, but to do anything with it I have to convert it back to an sp class... –  Spacedman Feb 4 '13 at 14:00

head(meuse) didn't give you the first few rows of the dataset meuse but its first few columns (6 + the coordinate column).
Your dataset testgeo only have 1 column so head(testgeo) fails. However head(testgeo,1) works.

head(testgeo,1)
   coordinates myvariable
1       (1, 1)          1
2       (2, 2)          2
3       (3, 3)          3
4       (4, 4)          4
5       (5, 5)          5
6       (6, 6)          6
7       (7, 7)          7
8       (8, 8)          8
9       (9, 9)          9
10    (10, 10)         10

The reason why columns are selected instead of rows is unknown to me but if you want to see the first few rows of testgeo you can use the more traditional:

testgeo[1:5, ]
  coordinates myvariable
1      (1, 1)          1
2      (2, 2)          2
3      (3, 3)          3
4      (4, 4)          4
5      (5, 5)          5
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the fast response! –  GeogRaphy Feb 4 '13 at 11:08

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