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i m in trouble with a simple REST service using this code :

@GET
@Path("next/{uuid}")
@Produces({"application/xml", "application/json"})
public synchronized Links nextLink(@PathParam("uuid") String uuid) {
    Links link = null;
    try {
        link = super.next();
        if (link != null) {
            link.setStatusCode(5);
            link.setProcessUUID(uuid);
            getEntityManager().flush(); 
            Logger.getLogger("Glassfish Rest Service").log(Level.INFO, "Process {0} request url : {1} #id  {2} at {3} #", new Object[]{uuid, link.getLinkTxt(), link.getLinkID(), Calendar.getInstance().getTimeInMillis()});
        }
    } catch (NoResultException ex) {
    } catch (IllegalArgumentException ex) {
    }
    return link;
}

this should provide a link object, and mark it as used (setStatusCode(5)) to prevent next access to service to send the same object. the probleme, is that when there s a lot of fast clients accessing to the web service, this one provides 2 or 3 times the same link object to different clients. how can i solve this ??

here is the resquest using to : @NamedQuery(name = "Links.getNext", query = "SELECT l FROM Links l WHERE l.statusCode = 2")

and the super.next() methode :

public T next() {

    javax.persistence.Query q = getEntityManager().createNamedQuery("Links.getNext");
    q.setMaxResults(1);
    T res = (T) q.getSingleResult();
    return res;
}

thx

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3  
Not sure I can answer a question in which you swallow exceptions! –  Brian Agnew Feb 4 '13 at 10:34
    
not sure this kind of answer can help anyone here... –  user1754385 Feb 4 '13 at 17:28

3 Answers 3

The life-cycle of a (root) JAX-RS resource is per request, so the (otherwise correct) synchronized keyword on the nextLink method is sadly ineffectual.

What you need is a mean to synchronize the access/update. This could be done in many ways:

I) You could synchronize on an external object, injected by a framework (example: a CDI injected @ApplicationScoped) as in:

@ApplicationScoped
public class SyncLink{
    private ReentrantLock lock = new ReentrantLock();
    public Lock getLock(){
       return lock;
    }
}
....
public class MyResource{
  @Inject SyncLink sync;

  @GET
  @Path("next/{uuid}")
  @Produces({"application/xml", "application/json"})
  public Links nextLink(@PathParam("uuid") String uuid) {
    sync.getLock().lock();
    try{
      Links link = null;
      try {
        link = super.next();
        if (link != null) {
            link.setStatusCode(5);
            link.setProcessUUID(uuid);
            getEntityManager().flush(); 
            Logger.getLogger("Glassfish Rest Service").log(Level.INFO, "Process {0} request url : {1} #id  {2} at {3} #", new Object[]{uuid, link.getLinkTxt(), link.getLinkID(), Calendar.getInstance().getTimeInMillis()});
        }
      } catch (NoResultException ex) {
      } catch (IllegalArgumentException ex) {
      }
      return link;
    }finally{
       sync.getLock().unlock();
    }
  }
}

II) You could be lazy and synchronize on the class

public class MyResource{
  @Inject SyncLink sync;

  @GET
  @Path("next/{uuid}")
  @Produces({"application/xml", "application/json"})
  public Links nextLink(@PathParam("uuid") String uuid) {
     Links link = null;
    synchronized(MyResource.class){
      try {
        link = super.next();
        if (link != null) {
            link.setStatusCode(5);
            link.setProcessUUID(uuid);
            getEntityManager().flush(); 
            Logger.getLogger("Glassfish Rest Service").log(Level.INFO, "Process {0} request url : {1} #id  {2} at {3} #", new Object[]{uuid, link.getLinkTxt(), link.getLinkID(), Calendar.getInstance().getTimeInMillis()});
        }
      } catch (NoResultException ex) {
      } catch (IllegalArgumentException ex) {
      }

    }
    return link;
  }
}

III) You could synchronize using the database. In that case you would investigate the pessimistic locking available in JPA2.

share|improve this answer
    
thx for the help. –  user1754385 Feb 6 '13 at 9:26
    
You're welcome. Which solution did you choose? –  Carlo Pellegrini Feb 6 '13 at 9:29
    
I tryed solution I. i have now less 'collisions', i.e less links provided many times to clients, but the lock is not 100% efficient –  user1754385 Feb 6 '13 at 10:08
    
Are you deploying on more than one application server? BTW: which application server do you use? –  Carlo Pellegrini Feb 6 '13 at 10:14
    
I m using glassfish 3.1.2 for the devel. the application is deployed only on one server and only one instance of the application is running. the problem occurs only at start up, when all the clients connect to the glassfish rest service and request links. Running 6 simultaneous clients is enough to observe the bad behaviour of the REST service –  user1754385 Feb 6 '13 at 10:51

You need to use some form of locking, most likely optimistic version locking. This will ensure only one transaction succeeds, the other will fail.

See, http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Java_Persistence/Locking

share|improve this answer
    
thx a lot, it seems to be 'theoretically' the good solution. i still testing all locks and hope i can soon have a good solution –  user1754385 Feb 4 '13 at 17:27
    
when i try to deal with JPA2 locks, i have many org.eclipse.persistence.exceptions.* (* depends of the locktype i try to use) that i can not catch or dont know where to catch –  user1754385 Feb 6 '13 at 10:19

Depending on how frequent you believe the contention will be in creating new Links you should choose either Optimistic locking using a @Version property or Pessimistic locking.

My guess is optimistic locking will work out better for you. In any case let your Resource class act as a Service Facade and place the model related code into a Stateless Session Bean EJB and handle any OptimisticLockExceptions with a simply retry.

I noticed you mentioned you are having trouble catching locking related exceptions and it also looks like you are using Eclipselink. In that case you could try something like this:

@Stateless
public class LinksBean {

  @PersistenceContext(unitName = "MY_JTA_PU")
  private EntityManager em;

  @Resource
  private SessionContext sctx;

  public Links createUniqueLink(String uuid) {
    Links myLink = null;
    shouldRetry = false;
    do {
      try
        myLink = sctx.getBusinessObject(LinksBean.class).createUniqueLinkInNewTX(uuid);
      }catch(OptimisticLockException olex) {
        //Retry
        shouldRetry = true;
      }catch(Exception ex) {
       //Something else bad happened so maybe we don't want to retry 
       log.error("Something bad happened", ex);
       shouldRetry = false;   
    } while(shouldRetry);
    return myLink;
  }

  @TransactionAttribute(TransactionAttributeType.REQUIRES_NEW)
  public Links createUniqueLinkInNewTX(uuid) {
      TypedQuery<Links> q = em.createNamedQuery("Links.getNext", Links.class);
      q.setMaxResults(1);
      try {
        myLink = q.getSingleResult();
      }catch(NoResultException) {
        //No more Links that match my criteria
        myLink = null;
      }
      if (myLink != null) {
        myLink.setProcessUUID(uuid);
        //If you change your getNext NamedQuery to add 'AND l.uuid IS NULL' you 
        //could probably obviate the need for changing the status code to 5 but if you 
        //really need the status code in addition to the UUID then:
        myLink.setStatusCode(5);
      }
      //When this method returns the transaction will automatically be committed 
      //by the container and the entitymanager will flush. This is the point that any 
      //optimistic lock exception will be thrown by the container. Additionally you 
      //don't need an explicit merge because myLink is managed as the result of the 
      //getSingleResult() call and as such simply using its setters will be enough for 
      //eclipselink to automatically merge it back when it commits the TX
      return myLink; 
  }  
}

Your JAX-RS/Jersey Resource class should then look like so:

@Path("/links")
@RequestScoped
public class MyResource{
  @EJB LinkBean linkBean;

  @GET
  @Path("/next/{uuid}")
  @Produces({"application/xml", "application/json"})
  public Links nextLink(@PathParam("uuid") String uuid) {
     Links link = null;
     if (uuid != null) {
         link = linkBean.createUniqueLink(uuid);
         Logger.getLogger("Glassfish Rest Service").log(Level.INFO, "Process {0} request url : {1} #id  {2} at {3} #", new Object[]{uuid, link.getLinkTxt(), link.getLinkID(), Calendar.getInstance().getTimeInMillis()});
      }
    return link;
  }
}

That's a semi-polished example of one approach to skin this cat and there's a lot going on here. Let me know if you have any questions.

Also, from the REST end of things you might consider using @PUT for this resource instead of @GET because your endpoint has the side effect of updating (UUID and/or statusCode) the state of the resource not simply fetching it.

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