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Sometimes I need to create objects whose constructors take very long time to execute. This leads to responsiveness problems in UI applications.

So I was wondering if it could be sensible to write a constructor designed to be called asynchronously, by passing a callback to it which will alert me when the object is available.

Below is a sample code:

class C
{
public:
    // Standard ctor
    C()
    {
        init();
    }

    // Designed for async ctor
    C(std::function<void(void)> callback)
    {
        init();
        callback();
    }

private:
    void init() // Should be replaced by delegating costructor (not yet supported by my compiler)
    {
        std::chrono::seconds s(2);
        std::this_thread::sleep_for(s);
        std::cout << "Object created" << std::endl;
    }
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    auto msgQueue = std::queue<char>();
    std::mutex m;
    std::condition_variable cv;
    auto notified = false;

    // Some parallel task
    auto f = []()
    {
        return 42;
    };

    // Callback to be called when the ctor ends
    auto callback = [&m,&cv,&notified,&msgQueue]()
    {
        std::cout << "The object you were waiting for is now available" << std::endl;
        // Notify that the ctor has ended
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> _(m);
        msgQueue.push('x');
        notified = true;
        cv.notify_one();
    };

    // Start first task
    auto ans = std::async(std::launch::async, f);

    // Start second task (ctor)
    std::async(std::launch::async, [&callback](){ auto c = C(callback); });

    std::cout << "The answer is " << ans.get() << std::endl;

    // Mimic typical UI message queue
    auto done = false;
    while(!done)
    {
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock(m);
        while(!notified)
        {
            cv.wait(lock);
        }
        while(!msgQueue.empty())
        {
            auto msg = msgQueue.front();
            msgQueue.pop();

            if(msg == 'x')
            {
                done = true;
            }
        }
    }

    std::cout << "Press a key to exit..." << std::endl;
    getchar();

    return 0;
}

Do you see any drawback in this design? Or do you know if there is a better approach?

EDIT

Following the hints of JoergB's answer, I tried to write a factory which will bear the responsibility to create an object in a sync or async way:

template <typename T, typename... Args>
class FutureFactory
{
public:
    typedef std::unique_ptr<T> pT;
    typedef std::future<pT> future_pT;
    typedef std::function<void(pT)> callback_pT;

public:
    static pT create_sync(Args... params)
    {
        return pT(new T(params...));
    }

    static future_pT create_async_byFuture(Args... params)
    {
        return std::async(std::launch::async, &FutureFactory<T, Args...>::create_sync, params...);
    }

    static void create_async_byCallback(callback_pT cb, Args... params)
    {
        std::async(std::launch::async, &FutureFactory<T, Args...>::manage_async_byCallback, cb, params...);
    }

private:
    FutureFactory(){}

    static void manage_async_byCallback(callback_pT cb, Args... params)
    {
        auto ptr = FutureFactory<T, Args...>::create_sync(params...);
        cb(std::move(ptr));
    }
};
share|improve this question
    
did you try using std::async inside the constructor. i imagine you can just put the async into the callback and store the resulting as a member of the class itself. –  thang Feb 4 '13 at 11:06
    
@thang I would like to try it... the problem to me is that you risk to have an object created but not yet ready to use. A isValid() method could help in this case, maybe... –  Cristiano Feb 4 '13 at 11:12
    
yeah you can add isValid or waitValid or something to that effect. that way everything is encapsulated into the class... same functionality, just a little neater. –  thang Feb 4 '13 at 11:15

7 Answers 7

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Your design seems very intrusive. I don't see a reason why the class would have to be aware of the callback.

Something like:

future<unique_ptr<C>> constructedObject = async(launchopt, [&callback]() {
      unique_ptr<C> obj(new C());
      callback();
      return C;
})

or simply

future<unique_ptr<C>> constructedObject = async(launchopt, [&cv]() {
      unique_ptr<C> ptr(new C());
      cv.notify_all(); // or _one();
      return ptr;
})

or just (without a future but a callback taking an argument):

async(launchopt, [&callback]() {
      unique_ptr<C> ptr(new C());
      callback(ptr);
})

should do just as well, shouldn't it? These also make sure that the callback is only ever called when a complete object is constructed (when deriving from C).

It shouldn't be too much effort to make any of these into a generic async_construct template.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, you'll need some synchronization to notify your UI thread that the object is ready. The last solution leaves all the responsibility to the callback. That may allow even lock-free signaling. The other methods leave transporting the result to the future and separate that from the signaling. Of course there is a gap between the signaling and the thread exit, which makes the future ready. But your use of a lock in the callback has a similar effect: there is a time where the main thread may block on that lock. –  JoergB Feb 4 '13 at 11:56

Encapsulate your problem. Don't think about asynchronous constructors, just asynchronous methods which encapsulate your object creation.

share|improve this answer
    
So you suggest something like an async factory? –  Cristiano Feb 4 '13 at 11:14
2  
@Cristiano This is an option. I was actually just saying that I didn't like asynchronousness to be tied to the native constructor itself. –  Daniel Daranas Feb 4 '13 at 11:20
4  
Second this. If you create an object, the normal exepectation is that it's fully constructed when the constructor returns -- not something else. Either the constructor throws, or you have a valid object, no guesswork. On the other hand, there is nothing wrong with creating an async task that constructs an object (synchronously, from its point of view). –  Damon Feb 4 '13 at 11:33
    
@Damon yeah, this is why I would like to avoid to use the async call inside the ctor. To me, the ctor should only be designed to allow to call it asynchronously. –  Cristiano Feb 4 '13 at 11:35

It looks like you should be using std::future rather than constructing a message queue. std::future is a template class that holds a value and can retrieve the value blocking, timeout or polling:

std::future<int> fut = ans;
fut.wait();
auto result = fut.get();
share|improve this answer
    
The message queue is only noise here... just to mimic a typical UI message loop. –  Cristiano Feb 4 '13 at 11:16
    
this is good except that if you have several objects pending creation... wait will block. –  thang Feb 4 '13 at 11:18
    
@thang yes, this is a deficiency of std::future. open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/papers/2012/n3428.pdf proposes when_any; many futures libraries have something similar or you can put it together from primitives (like @Cristiano's condition variables). –  ecatmur Feb 4 '13 at 11:22

I will suggest a hack using thread and signal handler.

1) Spawn a thread to do the task of the constructor. Lets call it child thread. This thread will intialise the values in your class.

2) After the constructor is completed, child thread uses the kill system call to send a signal to the parent thread. (Hint : SIGUSR1). The main thread on receiving the ASYNCHRONOUS handler call will know that the required object has been created.

Ofcourse, you can use fields like object-id to differentiate between multiple objects in creation.

share|improve this answer
2  
It seems to me that, except for the signal thing, this is exactly what my sample code does. –  Cristiano Feb 4 '13 at 11:20

My advice...

Think carefully about why you need to do such a long operation in a constructor.

I find often it is better to split the creation of an object into three parts

a) allocation b) construction c) initialization

For small objects it makes sense to do all three in one "new" operation. However, heavy weight objects, you really want to separate the stages. Figure out how much resource you need and allocate it. Construct the object in the memory into a valid, but empty state.

Then... do your long load operation into the already valid, but empty object.

I think I got this pattern a long time ago from reading a book (Scott Myers perhaps?) but I highly recommend it, it solves all sorts of problems. For example, if your object is a graphic object, you figure out how much memory it needs. If it fails, show the user an error as soon as possible. If not mark the object as not read yet. Then you can show it on screen, the user can also manipulate it, etc. Initialize the object with an asynchronous file load, when it completes, set a flag in the object that says "loaded". When your update function sees it is loaded, it can draw the graphic.

It also REALLY helps with problems like construction order, where object A needs object B. You suddenly find you need to make A before B, oh no!! Simple, make an empty B, and pass it as a reference, as long as A is clever enough to know that be is empty, and wait to it is not before it uses it, all is well.

And... Not forgetting.. You can do the opposite on destruction. Mark your object as empty first, so nothing new uses it (de-initialisation) Free the resources, (destruction) Then free the memory (deallocation)

The same benefits apply.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a wise suggestion, thanks for sharing! –  Cristiano Feb 4 '13 at 20:19

Having partially initialized objects could lead to bugs or unnecessarily complicated code, since you would have to check whether they're initialized or not.

I'd recommend using separate threads for UI and processing, and then use message queues for communicating between threads. Leave the UI thread for just handling the UI, which will then be more responsive all the time.

Place a message requesting creation of the object into the queue that the worker thread waits on, and then after the object has been created, the worker can put a message into UI queue indicating that the object is now ready.

share|improve this answer
    
You are right. This is why I want to create the object in a separate thread. This is exactly what I want to do, except that I do not have an "explicit" thread, because I am using the std::async facility. –  Cristiano Feb 4 '13 at 11:28
    
Obviously you could insert a message into the UI message queue from the async ctor launched with std::async, so it is more of a question whether you want to be in control of things. For example, lauching two async ctors: do you wan't them both running in parallel (two threads), or one after other? And you don't need to check std::future. –  Jari Karppanen Feb 4 '13 at 11:44

Here's yet another pattern for consideration. It takes advantage of the fact that calling wait() on a future<> does not invalidate it. So, as long you never call get(), you're safe. This pattern's trade-off is that you incur the onerous overhead of calling wait() whenever a member function gets called.

class C
{
    future<void> ready_;

public:
    C()
    {
        ready_ = async([this]
        {
            this_thread::sleep_for(chrono::seconds(3));
            cout << "I'm ready now." << endl;
        });
    }

    // Every member function must start with ready_.wait(), even the destructor.

    ~C(){ ready_.wait(); }

    void foo()
    {
        ready_.wait();

        cout << __FUNCTION__ << endl;
    }
};

int main()
{
    C c;

    c.foo();

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I would feel a little bit scary with this solution, because bad things could happen if I just forget to wait at the beginning of every method. Moreover, this will cause the caller to block when it calls the first method, and introduces an unnecessary overhead when it calls any other following method. –  Cristiano Feb 6 '13 at 13:16

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