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Hey there I'm wondering how this is done as when I try the following code inside a function of a class it produces some php error which I can't catch

public $tasks;
$this->tasks = new tasks($this);
$this->tasks->test();

I don't know why the initiation of the class requires $this as a parameter either :S

thanks

class admin
{
    function validate()
    {
    	if(!$_SESSION['level']==7){
    		barMsg('YOU\'RE NOT ADMIN', 0);
    		return FALSE;
    	}else{
    		**public $tasks;** // The line causing the problem
    		$this->tasks = new tasks(); // Get rid of $this->
    		$this->tasks->test(); // Get rid of $this->
    		$this->showPanel();
    	}
    }
}
class tasks
{
    function test()
    {
    	echo 'test';
    }
}
$admin = new admin();
$admin->validate();
share|improve this question
    
What is public $tasks; in there for? –  brianreavis Sep 23 '09 at 21:32
    
I thought it was required to create an object of another class that the variable it is contained within to be public but I don't know. –  Supernovah Sep 23 '09 at 21:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You can't declare the public $tasks inside your class's method (function.) If you don't need to use the tasks object outside of that method, you can just do:

$tasks = new Tasks($this);
$tasks->test();

You only need to use the "$this->" when your using a variable that you want to be available throughout the class.

Your two options:

class Foo
{
    public $tasks;

    function doStuff()
    {
        $this->tasks = new Tasks();
        $this->tasks->test();
    }

    function doSomethingElse()
    {
        // you'd have to check that the method above ran and instantiated this
        // and that $this->tasks is a tasks object
        $this->tasks->blah();
    }

}

or

class Foo
{
    function doStuff()
    {
        $tasks = new tasks();
        $tasks->test();
    }
}

with your code:

class Admin
{
    function validate()
    {
        // added this so it will execute
        $_SESSION['level'] = 7;

        if (! $_SESSION['level'] == 7) {
            // barMsg('YOU\'RE NOT ADMIN', 0);
            return FALSE;
        } else {
            $tasks = new Tasks();
            $tasks->test();
            $this->showPanel();
        }
    }

    function showPanel()
    {
        // added this for test
    }
}
class Tasks
{
    function test()
    {
        echo 'test';
    }
}
$admin = new Admin();
$admin->validate();
share|improve this answer
    
it didn't work. I just updated my question with a more verbose copy of my code –  Supernovah Sep 23 '09 at 21:39
    
thanks for the work u just did :) –  Supernovah Sep 23 '09 at 21:51
    
Thanks Lance, on monday's and friday's the most simple things are forgotten, thanks for the reminder ;-) –  ChrisH Mar 25 '11 at 12:35

You're problem is with this line of code:

public $tasks;
$this->tasks = new tasks();
$this->tasks->test();
$this->showPanel();

The public keyword is used in the definition of the class, not in a method of the class. In php, you don't even need to declare the member variable in the class, you can just do $this->tasks=new tasks() and it gets added for you.

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