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I have been learning Java for a while now and still learning new syntax tricks and stuff. I came across this in Android source code:

boolean retry = id == 1;

What does it mean?

PS: It was hard to google for this syntax, so I resorted to asking SO.

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28  
If you need to comment to clarify the question, please do so. The comments don't work so well for flaming, extended banter, or discerning the color of your socks. –  George Stocker Feb 4 '13 at 16:58
35  
Wow, this has over 80 total votes positive and negative. Why are people voting it down? It's clear, and it's on topic, and although it's a beginner question, it would be hard to google it. In order to find the answer you would have to know it was an operator precedence issue, and that's easily something a beginner might not yet understand. It's not a crime to be a beginner. –  Gus Feb 15 '13 at 21:05
    
@Gus If it helps, this question was a bit controversial - at least enough to spark a meta post. That should explain some of the downvotes on both the question as well as the answers. –  Mysticial Feb 16 '13 at 17:26
4  
Really no need of down votes for this question... –  Deepzz Feb 18 '13 at 8:25
14  
This question just farmed Reversal badges. Wish I'd gotten in on it. –  Andrew Mao Feb 22 '13 at 7:48

15 Answers 15

up vote 141 down vote accepted

retry is true if id has the value 1, otherwise retry is false.

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id == 1 is a boolean expression which is true if id equals 1, and false otherwise.

boolean retry = id == 1; declares a boolean variable named retry, and assigns the value of the boolean expression id == 1 to this variable.

So it declares a boolean variable which is true if id == 1, and false otherwise.

To make it a bit clearer, you might write it that way:

boolean retry = (id == 1);
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I'd read it as a shorthand for id == 1 ? true : false where the true and false have become redundant –  Matt Potts Feb 4 '13 at 23:26
1  
@MattPotts I'd read your code as a longhand for this one. –  m93a Apr 8 at 10:21

It is the same as

boolean retry;
if (id == 1)
   retry = true;
else
   retry = false;
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==, which is the equality predicate, has a higher precedence than =, which is the assignment operator.

Therefore, id == 1 is evaluated first and then its value (either true or false) is assigned to retry.

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The boolean retry gets the value of true if id == 1.

It's the same as:

boolean retry;
if (id == 1) {
    retry = true;
} else {
    retry = false;
}
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... but illustrating the point rather neatly:) –  Simon Hellinger Feb 4 '13 at 14:24
2  
@duffy356 I wouldn't say it's slow, unless you do this gazillion times a second. Rather it is far too verbose, but it is deliberate. –  Malcolm Feb 4 '13 at 14:53
4  
@duffy356 it is not going to make a darn difference. The compiler is smart enough to see that it is equivalent. How else would you think stuff gets done in machine instructions... (perhaps with debug information there might be a difference) –  sehe Feb 4 '13 at 23:50
    
@duffy356: can you remove your incorrect comment so I can remove my downvote on your answer? –  user7116 Feb 6 '13 at 17:22
    
Debug information is completely ignored (absent!) at runtime and thus should not make a difference. –  TheBlastOne Apr 15 '13 at 13:51

first the id is evaluated with 1, so presumably id is an integer.

After that, the value retry is assigned this evaluation, so if id is equal to 1, retry will become true, and for any other value of id retry will become false.

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This line creates a boolean variable and sets it to true if id is equal to 1 and false if it is not.

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I find that just using parens helps to clear up the confusion behind complex statements like this.

boolean retry = (id == 1); Makes much more sense to me. Here it's clear that (id == 1) is an expression being evaluated and the result is being assigned to boolean retry

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3  
What’s complex about it? –  Jon Purdy Feb 4 '13 at 23:49
    
It is a basic concept that a Java programmer should know that == has precedence over =. –  ShuklaSannidhya Feb 5 '13 at 10:51
    
Not complex as in complicated. I meant complex as in a statement composed of multiple operations (evaluation, assignment). Compound if you prefer? –  Zeph Feb 5 '13 at 14:01

It is a way of defining a boolean variable.

When id is 1, the value of retry will be true.

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It is acts like a ternary operation, (x) ? true : false in C, C++, C#, etc;

The similar syntax:

boolean retry = (id == 1)? true: false; 

Or it can written another way:

boolean retry;
if (id == 1) {
    retry = true;
} else {
    retry = false;
}
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It might be easier to see whats happening if you look at it like this:

boolean retry = (id == 1);

So basically it checks if id equals 1, and then assigns the result to the variable retry.

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retry assigns an expression which will be either true or false as retry is a boolean. Further, == will be solved first and then it will be assigned to retry.

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It is basically the same as retry = (id == 1). It is evaluating the boolean expression, and assigning it to retry.

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1.int id = 1;
  boolean retry = id == 1;

which means retry = true;.

2.int id = 2;
  boolean retry = id == 1;

which means retry = false;.

Simplification id == 1 can be consider as

if ( id == 1 ){
}
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I will base my response on the assumption that id is an int hence the comparison against 1 is proper and a compilation error is not in place. == is the equality operator in java as described in section 15.21.1 of the JLS. Being a boolean operator, == will output a boolean value. = is the java's assignment operator, in this particular case it's the compound assignment operator having the following syntax:

boolean f = (op1 op op2)

In translation = assigns the output value of the (op1 op op2) operation to the left operand, in this case f.

Looking back to your sample, the output of id == 1 (true if id has the value 1, false otherwise) is assigned to retry.

To conclude in plain english, your sample has the following meaning: Retry as long as id has the value 1.

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