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I applied for a Ruby job recently and was asked to code a method to "Write a Ruby function named "query_to_hash" which takes a single String argument as an HTTP query string (e.g. foo=bar&abc=1%202%203) and returns a Hash of the name/value pairs like following:

 {"foo" => "bar", "abc" => "1 2 3"}

I provided the attached code example and got some feedback to the effect that my style of Ruby was not what they wanted.

I'm curious now to know what style issues developers would see in the attached and would appreciate constructive feedback.

require 'rubygems'
require 'uri'
require 'rack'

include Rack::Utils

$SAFE = 3

# HTTP Query string (from wikipedia)

#field1=value1&field2=value2&field3=value3...
# The query string is composed of a series of field-value pairs.
# Within each pair, the field name and value are separated by an equals sign. The equals sign may be omitted if the value is an empty string.
# The series of pairs is separated by the ampersand, '&' (or semicolon, ';' for URLs embedded in HTML and not generated by a <form>...</form>; see below).
# While there is no definitive standard, most web frameworks allow multiple values to be associated with a single field[3][4]:

# field1=value1&field1=value2&field1=value3...

def query_to_hash(qry, sep = '&')

  # assume input string conforms to spec (no validation)
  # assume only & or ; is used - not both
  # return a null string if value is not defined
  # return null hash if query is null string
  # return array of values in hash if field has multiple values

  #@qry = qry.gsub(/%20/, " ")
  @qry = URI.unescape(qry)

  rtn = Hash.new {|h,k| h[k]=[]}

  if @qry == "" then 
  # return an empty hash
  #
    return {}
  else
      qry_a = @qry.split(sep)     
  end

  qry_a.each do |fv_pair|
    pair = fv_pair.split('=')

    # append multiple values if needed and ensure that null values are accommodated
    #
    rtn[pair[0]] << pair[1] ||= ""
  end 

  # collapse array if it contains only one item
  #
  rtn.each{|k,v| rtn[k] = *v if v.length == 1}

end



puts "Using 'query_to_hash' method:"
puts
test_values  = %w[foo=bar&abc=1%202%203 
                  foo&abc=1%202%203
                  foo=&abc=1%202%203
                  foo=bar&foo=boo&abc=1%202%203
                 ]

test_values.each { |v| puts "#{sprintf("%30s",v)} is returned as #{query_to_hash(v).inspect}" }           

test_values = %w[ foo=bar;foo=boo;abc=1%202%203
                  foo=bar;foo=boo;abc=1%0A2%203
                  foo=bar;foo=boo;abc=1%092%0D3
                 ]

test_values.each { |v| puts "#{sprintf("%30s",v)} is returned as #{query_to_hash(v, ';').inspect}" }       

puts "#{sprintf("%30s", "null string")} is returned as #{query_to_hash("").inspect}"

# compare with Rack::Utils::parse_query
#
puts
puts "Using 'Rack::Utils::parse_query' method:"
puts
test_values  = %w[foo=bar&abc=1%202%203 
                  foo&abc=1%202%203
                  foo=&abc=1%202%203
                  foo=bar&foo=boo&abc=1%202%203
                 ]

test_values.each { |v| puts "#{sprintf("%30s",v)} is returned as #{parse_query(v).inspect}" }           

test_values = %w[ foo=bar;foo=boo;abc=1%202%203
                  foo=bar;foo=boo;abc=1%0A2%203
                  foo=bar;foo=boo;abc=1%092%0D3
                 ]

test_values.each { |v| puts "#{sprintf("%30s",v)} is returned as #{parse_query(v, ';').inspect}" }       

puts "#{sprintf("%30s", "null string")} is returned as #{parse_query("").inspect}"
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closed as off topic by hauleth, Jörg W Mittag, TemplateRex, Ralgha, Neolisk Feb 4 '13 at 19:34

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This belongs on CodeReview.SE –  Jörg W Mittag Feb 4 '13 at 15:40

2 Answers 2

I can't see anything which screams 'this is wrong' to me. Your code is well-commented and pretty clear and you've got a grasp of the core language constructs and the basic API.

Were specific reasons given or did they just use a catch all 'we don't like your style' ?

Disclaimer: I'm a java dev who's moved to ruby, so it's possible I've not got the best mental image of proper ruby 'style', but I can say that we have far worse code in our system.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for the need for more specific reasons. It's unhelpful to just say "we don't like your style". –  iain Feb 4 '13 at 12:34
    
@iain - I think OP ran afoul of a member of the style mafia. I'm a pragmatist myself, if it's clear and it does the job and a junior dev can be trusted with it, it will do for now and can be revisited at a later stage. –  mcfinnigan Feb 4 '13 at 12:35
    
I agree. Then again, the other candidates may have produced better code (in their opinion), and it is a bit more towards the C-ish end of coding than idiomatic Ruby. –  iain Feb 4 '13 at 12:42
    
I try to take a pragmatic approach myself - your users don't see your code, just its behaviour (including defects). I suppose there is a point to style when you have many developers (I've been the sole Rubyist on my project so style issues are not that important in my context). –  tom Feb 4 '13 at 14:31

Only two things really jumped out at me.

qry_a = @qry.split(sep)

The variable on the above line is local, and only comes into existence within the else clause, yet you refer to it again later.

@qry = URI.unescape(qry)

The use of an instance variable isn't needed unless you have an object, and I'd suggest it is a problem as it immediately opens up the scope of the variable beyond the method. Personally, I try to use locals as much as possible.

Aside from that, it seems fine to me. Perhaps you could've used a test framework like Minitest or RSpec for the tests, but it seems fine in style.

I agree with @mcfinnigan that more specific points would've been more helpful to you.


I'll add (as I was a bit hasty), using array indices directly is also not such great style, as it gets confusing quickly. For example, this looks like Perl i.e. line noise :)

rtn[pair[0]] << pair[1] ||= ""

You've also used each to affect a value when something like map or select might be better, as they explicitly affect value instead of doing it as a side effect. Being clear and explicit is good style in Ruby (IMO).


One more thought… (my coffee is kicking in:) Since this was a job interview, perhaps they were looking for something beyond this. For example, my first thought upon seeing the spec was "why pass the string as an argument?" You may have been better doing something like:

class String
  def query_to_hash( separator="&" )
    # more code

and then it could be called from "foo=bar&abc=1%202%203".query_to_hash, which is far more Rubyish.

Even better than a monkeypatch, inheritance (too often overlooked).

class QueryString < String
  def to_hash( separator="&" )
    # some code that refers to `self`

and then it could be used via:

QueryString.new("foo=bar&abc=1%202%203").to_hash

which is far clearer to read and understand and makes much clearer what you are trying to achieve. There are other ways to do this too, and perhaps that is what would separate you from the crowd.

share|improve this answer
    
I was intrigued as the feedback "we don't like your style" was not very helpful but your comments seem very apposite, relevant and well-taken. –  tom Feb 4 '13 at 14:42
    
I accept that monkeypatching String might have been possible but the requirements were a bit leading in that they required a "function". –  tom Feb 4 '13 at 14:47
    
@torn maybe they were referring to your sartorial style… i.e. never wear an "I love the Phantom Menace" t-shirt to an interview at a startup, those kids are just too cool for that! B-) –  iain Feb 4 '13 at 14:59
1  
Damn! I new I should have ditched the Andre Rieu T-shirt! –  tom Feb 4 '13 at 15:09

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