Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to identify the risks in deleting tables from my database.

The database is large and contains hundreds of tables.

I have a query that returns Foreign Keys associated with a table. So I can feed it table names I want to delete and it tells me what tables rely on columns it has. So I will also have to delete the tables that are returned.

My problem comes that as I would then need to delete those tables, I'd like to see any other tables that depend on the inital results.

As such I believe I need my query to loop calling itself with the results of it's last run, until there are no more unique results.

Is this possible? Is there an easier way of doing this?

Thanks in advance.

EDIT: Here's the query:

SELECT
      PK.TABLE_NAME AS PrimaryTable,
      FK.TABLE_NAME AS ForeignTable,
      PT.COLUMN_NAME AS PrimaryColumn,
      CU.COLUMN_NAME AS ForeignColumn,
      C.CONSTRAINT_NAME AS ConstraintName
FROM
INFORMATION_SCHEMA.REFERENTIAL_CONSTRAINTS C
INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS FK ON C.CONSTRAINT_NAME = FK.CONSTRAINT_NAME
INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS PK ON C.UNIQUE_CONSTRAINT_NAME = PK.CONSTRAINT_NAME
INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.KEY_COLUMN_USAGE CU ON C.CONSTRAINT_NAME = CU.CONSTRAINT_NAME
INNER JOIN (
                  SELECT i1.TABLE_NAME, i2.COLUMN_NAME
                  FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS i1
                  INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.KEY_COLUMN_USAGE i2 ON i1.CONSTRAINT_NAME = i2.CONSTRAINT_NAME
                  WHERE i1.CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'PRIMARY KEY'
                  ) PT ON PT.TABLE_NAME = PK.TABLE_NAME
WHERE PK.TABLE_NAME IN
('Table1','Table2')
ORDER BY
1,2,3,4
share|improve this question
    
Can you post the query itself? You might be able to use a recursive CTE to do the looping. It is useful for hierarchies. –  Matt Feb 4 '13 at 12:32
    
I've edited it into the question. I've thought and read about CTE's but not had much experience in them. –  Tom.Bowen89 Feb 4 '13 at 12:37
    
How do you handle the propagation of changes through triggers? Or do you scan for triggers and opt not to run if any are defined? –  HABO Feb 4 '13 at 14:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could try using a CTE as such. I find it easier to write the actual where clause on the final select statement but if performance is an issue, I would advise you to write the where clause on the relations CTE (above the UNION ALL)

CTE Select Statement

;WITH q AS (
  SELECT
        PK.TABLE_NAME AS PrimaryTable,
        FK.TABLE_NAME AS ForeignTable,
        PT.COLUMN_NAME AS PrimaryColumn,
        CU.COLUMN_NAME AS ForeignColumn,
        C.CONSTRAINT_NAME AS ConstraintName
  FROM
  INFORMATION_SCHEMA.REFERENTIAL_CONSTRAINTS C
  INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS FK ON C.CONSTRAINT_NAME = FK.CONSTRAINT_NAME
  INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS PK ON C.UNIQUE_CONSTRAINT_NAME = PK.CONSTRAINT_NAME
  INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.KEY_COLUMN_USAGE CU ON C.CONSTRAINT_NAME = CU.CONSTRAINT_NAME
  INNER JOIN (
                    SELECT i1.TABLE_NAME, i2.COLUMN_NAME
                    FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS i1
                    INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.KEY_COLUMN_USAGE i2 ON i1.CONSTRAINT_NAME = i2.CONSTRAINT_NAME
                    WHERE i1.CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'PRIMARY KEY'
                    ) PT ON PT.TABLE_NAME = PK.TABLE_NAME
)
, Relations AS (
  SELECT  PrimaryTable AS Root
          , *
  FROM    q
  UNION ALL
  SELECT  r.Root
          , q.PrimaryTable
          , q.ForeignTable
          , q.PrimaryColumn
          , q.ForeignColumn
          , q.ConstraintName
  FROM    q
          INNER JOIN Relations r ON r.ForeignTable = q.PrimaryTable
)
SELECT  *
FROM    Relations
WHERE   Root IN ('Table1','Table2')
ORDER BY
1,2,3,4
share|improve this answer
    
On your second last SELECT, q.Root doesn't exist. There isn't a Root column on q. –  Tom.Bowen89 Feb 4 '13 at 14:47
    
@Tom.Bowen89 - That'll teach me writing it on top of my head. I have altered the statement. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Feb 4 '13 at 15:38
    
Looks like this is working perfectly. Thanks. Will study it and get my head round CTE's. –  Tom.Bowen89 Feb 4 '13 at 16:24

I'm thinking you could create a global temp table with fields for table names and a processed flag and add the initial table name. Call your code with the initial seed of the table you want to delete. Insert the results to your temp table. Then iterate over the values in the temp table adding the results to the temp table, making sure that you don't insert duplicates and marking each one as processed when done. Continue until every record in the table is processed.

share|improve this answer
    
This does sound like a good valid solution. I currently don't have the kind of permissions required to do this, but I could get them if required. Ideally I'd like to do it all in one SELECT query. –  Tom.Bowen89 Feb 4 '13 at 12:38

Try something like this..

DECLARE @tablename varchar
DECLARE @flag bit
SET @tablename = 'some_table_name'
SET @flag-1
WHILE EXISTS(SELECT PK.TABLE_NAME AS PrimaryTable,
  FK.TABLE_NAME AS ForeignTable,
  PT.COLUMN_NAME AS PrimaryColumn,
  CU.COLUMN_NAME AS ForeignColumn . . . where PK.TABLE_NAME = @tablename)
  begin
   SET @flag=0
   SET @tablename=<assign the tables with fk referred by primarykey tables>
  end
IF(@flag=1)
 <delete query>

Its just an idea to solve your scenario not the complete solution.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.