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I'm trying to change some legacy code to use DI with Spring framework. I have a concrete case for which I'm wondering which is the most proper way to implement it.

It is a java desktop application. There is a DataManager interface used to query / change data from the data store. Currently there is only one implementation using a XML file for store, but in the future it is possible to add SQL implementation. Also for unit testing I may need to mock it.

Currently every peace of code that needs the data manager retrieves it by using a factory. Here is the source code of the factory:

public class DataManagerFactory   
{  
    private static DataManagerIfc dataManager;

    public static DataManagerIfc getInstance()
    {
        // Let assume synchronization is not needed
        if(dataManager == null)
            dataManager = new XMLFileDataManager();

        return dataManager;
    }
}

Now I see 3 ways to change the application to use DI and Spring.

I. Inject the dependency only in the factory and do not change any other code.

Here is the new code:

public class DataManagerFactory  
{
    private DataManagerIfc dataManager;

    public DataManagerFactory(DataManagerIfc dataManager)
    {
        this.dataManager = dataManager;
    }

    public DataManagerIfc getDataManager()
    {
        return dataManager;
    }

    public static DataManagerIfc getInstance()
    {
        return getFactoryInstance().getDataManager();
    }

    public static DataManagerFactory getFactoryInstance()
    {
        ApplicationContext context =
                    new ClassPathXmlApplicationContext(new String[] {"com/mypackage/SpringConfig.xml"});

        return context.getBean(DataManagerFactory.class);
    }
}

And the XML with the bean description:

<bean id="dataManagerFactory"
            class="com.mypackage.DataManagerFactory">
    <constructor-arg ref="xmlFileDataManager"/>
</bean>

<bean id="xmlFileDataManager"
    class="com.mypackage.datamanagers.xmlfiledatamanager.XMLFileDataManager">
</bean>

II. Change every class that is using the data manager so it takes it through the constructor and store it as a class variable. Make Spring bean definitions only for the "root" classes from where the chain of creation starts.

III. Same as II. but for every class that is using the data manager create a Spring bean definition and instantiate every such class by using the Spring Ioc container.

As I'm new to the DI concept, I will appreciate every advice what will be the correct and "best practice" solution. Many thanks in advance.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use option 3.

The first option keeps your code untestable. You won't be able to easily mock the static factory method so that it returns a mock DataManager.

The second option will force you to have the root classes know all the dependencies of all the non-root classes in order to make the code testable.

The third option really uses dependency injection, where each bean only know about its direct dependencies, and is injected by the DI container.

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I was also thinking that the third is real DI. But what bothers me is that I will end up with more than 100 bean definitions in an XML files. Would it be easy to maintain this. Or may be I have to add such definition only for classes for which I write unit tests. –  Boris Toninski Feb 4 '13 at 13:53
    
Spring supports annotations for a long time. You don't need to declare Spring beans in XML. static.springsource.org/spring/docs/3.1.x/… –  JB Nizet Feb 4 '13 at 13:57
    
This sounds reasonable. What I still can not clearly understand is when to use xml definition and when annotations. –  Boris Toninski Feb 4 '13 at 14:04
    
XML: when you really don't have any other choice (for example to declare a bean which doesn't have annotations, such as a Spring TxManager or DataSource). Annotations: whenever you can. Note that you can even replace XML config with Java config in latest versions of Spring. –  JB Nizet Feb 4 '13 at 14:06
    
Thanks a lot for the suggestions! –  Boris Toninski Feb 4 '13 at 14:13

Well... why did you write the factory in the first place? Spring is not intended to make you change how you write code (not just to suit Spring that is), so keeping the factory is correct as it uses well-known pattern. Injecting the dependency into the factory will retain that behaviour.

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Option 3 is the correct route to take. By using such a configuration you can usefully take components of your configuration and use them in new configurations, and everything will work as expected.

As a rule of thumb, I would expect one call to Spring to instantiate the application context and get the top-level bean. I wouldn't expect to make repeated calls to the Spring framework to get multiple beans. Everything should be injected at the correct level to reflect responsibilities etc.

Beware (since you're new to this) that you don't plumb in your data manager into every class available! This is quite a common mistake to make, and if you've not abstracted out and centralised responsibilities sufficiently, you'll find you're configuring classes with lots of managers. When you see you're doing this it's a good time to step back and look at your abstractions and componentisation.

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